“Ten Leading Causes of Death by State: 2004”

July 29, 2008

Between 2003 and 2004, mortality from all 10 of the leading causes of death in the U.S. declined or did not increase in six states: Kentucky, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Virginia and Wyoming.  (Source: National Vital Statistics System, CDC WONDER, “Ten Leading Causes of Death by State: 2004”)

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Disability and Health in the United States

July 29, 2008

Disability and Health in the United States, examines health-related differences between disabled and non-disabled noninstutionalized adults aged 18 years and over. During 2001-2005, almost 30 percent of noninstutionalized adults U.S population (approximately 62 million people) had basic actions difficulty, as indicated by reporting at least some basic difficulty with basic movement or sensory, cognitive, or emotional difficulties. More than one-fifth of the institutionalized adult population reported difficulty with basic movement actions such as walking, bending, reaching overhead, or using their fingers to grasp something. You can read more on disability in the U.S. here.


Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disability

July 29, 2008

Did you know that 8 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and learning disability?  The percent of children 6-17 years of age with ADHD (with and without LD) increased slowly from 1997 through 2006, whereas the percentage of children with LD (with and without ADHD) did not change significantly.  Approximately 5 percent of children had ADHD without LD. 5 percent had LD without ADHD, and 4 percent had both conditions. You can read more about ADHD/LD here


Infant Mortality Rate: No Change in 2005

July 29, 2008
The infant mortality rate in the United States in 2005 was 6.86 infant (under 1 year of age) deaths per 1,000 live births, not significantly different from the rate of 6.78 in 2004 or 6.89 in 2000, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. However, this seeming lack of change masks large differences in the risk of infant death between groups. Read more here.