New height, weight, and BMI tables available

October 29, 2008

This report presents national anthropometric reference data for all ages of the U.S. population in 2003–2006, adding to results published previously from 1960–2002. These latest NHANES data add to the knowledge about trends in child growth and development and trends in the distribution of body measurements, such as weight and height, in the U.S. population. To see full report, click here.

 


Food allergies on the rise among U.S. children

October 22, 2008

 

More Highlights from Data Brief #10:

  • In 2007, approximately 3 million children under age 18 years (3.9%) were reported to have a food or digestive allergy in the previous 12 months.
  • From 1997 to 2007, the prevalence of reported food allergy increased 18% among children under age 18 years.
  • Children with food allergy are two to four times more likely to have other related conditions such as asthma and other allergies, compared with children without food allergies.
  • From 2004 to 2006, there were approximately 9,500 hospital discharges per year with a diagnosis related to food allergy among children under age 18 years.
  • Link to full report.


    Latest trends in infant mortality available. U.S. ranked 29th in world, down from 23d in 1990

    October 15, 2008

    The U.S. infant mortality rate was 6.78 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2004, the latest year that data are available for all countries.  Infant mortality rates were generally lowest (below 3.5 per 1,000) in selected Scandinavian (Sweden, Norway, Finland) and East Asian (Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore) countries.  Twenty-two countries had infant mortality rates below 5.0 in 2004. 

     

    The findings are published in a new Data Brief “Recent Trends in Infant Mortality in the United States.”  The data come from the Linked Birth/Infant Death Data Set and Preliminary Mortality Data File, collected through the National Vital Statistics System. For more information, click here.


    New stats on end-of-life care in nursing homes

    October 9, 2008

    Data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (most recent available) sheds light on end-of-life (EOL) care in nursing homes. One in four residents began EOL care before being admitted to a nursing home. Nursing home residents receiving EOL care were older, more functionally and cognitively impaired, and more likely to have reported pain in the previous 7 days compared with nursing home residents not receiving EOL care. However, no differences in services and treatments received were observed depending on whether EOL care started on or prior to admission or after admission to the nursing home. For more info, see National Health Statistics Reports #9.


    New study examines quality of race and ethnicity data on death certificates

    October 1, 2008

    A new study has been released that compares race and ethnicity data on death certificates with U.S. Census Bureau information. The result? American Indians and Alaska Natives are poorly reported on death certificates (that is, funeral directors may not be classifying decedents correctly). Reporting is considered good for Asian/Pacific Islanders and Hispanics and excellent for the white and black populations. To read more, click here.