Outpatient surgeries increase in the U.S.

January 28, 2009

The number of outpatient surgery visits in the United States increased from 1996 to 2006, from 20.8 million to 34.7 million visits. Outpatient surgery visits accounted for about one half of all surgery visits in 1996 but nearly two thirds of all surgery visits in 2006. A new report from NCHS, “Ambulatory Surgery in the United States, 2006,” contains the first data on outpatient surgery visits since 1996. The data were collected from 142 hospitals and 295 freestanding centers as part of the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery (NSAS).

Highlights:

•Females had significantly more ambulatory surgery visits (20 million) than males (14.7 million).

•The procedures performed most often during outpatient surgery visits included endoscopies of the large intestine (5.8 million) and small intestine (3.5 million) and extraction of lens for cataract surgery (3.1 million).

•The leading diagnosis for outpatient surgery visits was cataract, with 3 million visits, followed by benign tumor (neoplasm) with 2 million visits and malignant tumor with 1.2 million visits.

     

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A brief look at anemia

January 22, 2009

Anemia/Iron Deficiency:

Morbidity

Percentage of children ages 1-2 years with iron deficiency: 7

Percentage of females ages 12-49 with iron deficiency: 12

Source: Iron Deficiency–United States, 1999-2000 

 

 

Nursing home care

Number of residents with anemia: 174,600

Percentage of residents with anemia: 1.1

Source: National Nursing Home Survey, 1999 

 

Mortality

Number of deaths: 4,624

Deaths per 100,000 population: 1.6

Source: Deaths: Final Data for 2005 


New Health E-Stat integrates obesity and overweight prevalence data

January 14, 2009

Results from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), using measured heights and weights, indicate that an estimated 32.7 percent of U.S. adults 20 years and older are overweight, 34.3 percent are obese and 5.9 percent are extremely obese. Additional data as well as figures and tables can be found by visiting the following Web addres: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/overweight/overweight_adult.htm


Teen births increase in over one-half of states

January 7, 2009

The teen birth rate increased in more than half of all 50 states in 2006, according to an NCHS report released today. Click here for the report.

The data show teen birth rates were highest in the South and Southwest, with the highest rate recorded in Mississippi (68.4), followed by New Mexico (64.1) and Texas (63.1).

Teen birth rates in 2006 were lowest in the Northeast in 2006, with the lowest rates occurring in New Hampshire (18.7), Vermont (20.8), and Massachusetts (21.3). The only states with a decrease in teen birth rates between 2005 and 2006 were North Dakota, Rhode Island, and New York.

NCHS reported in December 2007 that the teen birth rate for the nation as a whole increased for the first time in 15 years in 2006 from 40.5 births per 1,000 women aged 15-19 in 2005 to 41.9 in 2006.

The report also features birth data on a variety of topics, including state-based and national information on teen, unmarried, and multiple births, along with health data on smoking during pregnancy, cesarean delivery, preterm birth, and low birthweight.