Report on Hurricane Katrina’s effect on the number of births in the Gulf Region released

August 26, 2009

 

On Friday, August 28, 2009, CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics released “The Effect of Hurricane Katrina: Births in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region, Before and After the Storm.” The report documents how births were impacted in 91 Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) designated counties and parishes of Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi for a 12-month period before and after Hurricane Katrina (August 29, 2004 to August 28, 2006). Visit the NCHS Press Room for more information.

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Louisiana tops homicide, injury by firearms list

August 20, 2009

In 2006, Louisiana had the highest age-adjusted rate of homicides and injuries by firearms out of all 50 states:

  • Death rate from homicides: 12.8 deaths per 100,000 population
  • Rate of injury by firearms: 19.3 out of 100,000 populuation

For the complete listing of states, visit the report.

In 2005, Louisiana also topped all 50 states with its homicide and injury by firearms rate, with 12.9 homicides per 100,000 population and 18.6 injuries by firearms per 100,000 population. For the complete list of states, visit the report.


Women starting their families later in life

August 12, 2009

Did you know that in the United States, the average age of a mother at first birth has increased 3.6 years since 1970? Not only are U.S. women starting their families later in life, but the trend depends a great deal on a person’s race/ethnicity and where she lives. Also, the U.S. has a much lower average age at first birth than many developed countries. To read more about this, visit the new Data Brief from the National Center for Health statistics, “Delayed Childbearing: Women Are Having Their First Child Later in life.” Also, you can listen to the Statcast or ask questions of the author on this blog.


Obesity information-it starts with the letters NHANES

August 5, 2009

Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released information concerning the prevalence and costs of the growing epidemic of obesity in the United States. Some of the most critical information concerning the weight of the nation is collected in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which takes actual measurements of a nationally representative sample of the U.S. population.

For the most recent information on obesity and overweight, please visit the Health E-Stat report at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/overweight/overweight_adult.htm.

For a more general overview, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/overwt.htm.

As always, the NCHS press office can be reached at 301-458-4800.