Acceptance of New Patients With Public and Private Insurance by Office-based Physicians: United States, 2013

March 31, 2015

Physician acceptance of new Medicaid patients has shown to be lower than acceptance of new Medicare patients or new privately insured patients. Acceptance of new Medicaid patients also has shown to be lower in states with lower Medicaid payment rates to physicians.

Using the 2013 National Electronic Health Records Survey, this NCHS report summarizes physician acceptance of new patients with Medicaid, Medicare, and private insurance. It also summarizes information on how these acceptance rates vary by select physician characteristics and by state.

Key Findings from the Report:

 

  • In 2013, most office-based physicians (95.3%) were accepting new patients.
  • The percentage of physicians accepting new Medicaid patients (68.9%) was lower than the percentage accepting new Medicare (83.7%) or new privately insured (84.7%) patients.
  • The percentage of physicians accepting new Medicaid and Medicare patients was lower for physicians within metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) compared with physicians outside of MSAs.
  • The percentage of physicians who accepted new privately insured, Medicare, and Medicaid patients each varied by state.

 

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Trends in Emergency Department Visits for Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack: United States, 2001–2011

March 31, 2015

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. About 87% of all strokes are ischemic strokes. Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) cause similar symptoms, but the blockage of blood flow to the brain is temporary. However, about one-third of people who have a TIA will have a stroke within 1 year.

Emergency departments play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of ischemic stroke and TIA. The evaluation of these conditions in the emergency department is similar, so they are combined for this analysis.

A new NCHS report presents recent trends in visits to emergency departments for ischemic stroke or TIA.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 2001 through 2011, the rate of emergency department visits for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) decreased 35% for patients aged 18 and over and 51% for patients aged 55–74.
  • From 2004 through 2011, the percentage of emergency department visits for ischemic stroke or TIA in which the patient arrived by ambulance decreased 41% for patients under 75.
  • The percentage of emergency department visits for ischemic stroke or TIA in which a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) test was ordered or provided increased 39% from 2001 through 2011.
  • The percentage of emergency department visits for ischemic stroke or TIA that resulted in admission or transfer to a hospital increased 10% from 2001 through 2011.

 

 

 


Hypertension-related Mortality in the United States, 2000–2013

March 26, 2015

Hypertension is a chronic condition that can lead to heart disease, stroke, and other diseases that can result in premature death. Reducing the number of persons in the population with hypertension is one of the objectives of Healthy People 2020.

Using national multiple cause-of-death data files from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report presents trends in hypertension-related mortality for 2000–2013 by selected demographic characteristics and the underlying causes of hypertension-related death. Hypertension-related mortality is defined by any mention of hypertension on the death certificate. Because about 2% of all decedents with hypertension reported on the death certificate were under age 45, only decedents aged 45 and over were included in this analysis.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate increased 23.1%, whereas the rate for all other causes combined decreased 21.0% from 2000 through 2013.
  • Rates for hypertension-related death increased for both sexes aged 45–64 and 85 and over from 2000 through 2013.
  • The age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate increased for all Hispanic origin and race groups examined from 2000 through 2005. Since then, the rate for the non-Hispanic white population continued to increase, whereas the rate for the non-Hispanic black population decreased.
  • Although the age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate for the non-Hispanic black population was higher than for the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations throughout the period, the gap between them narrowed.

 


Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–September 2014

March 24, 2015

NCHS has released selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey, along with comparable estimates from the 2009–2013 NHIS. Estimates for January–September 2014 are based on data for 85,224 persons.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In the first 9 months of 2014, 37.2 million persons of all ages (11.9%) were uninsured at the time of interview, 53.5 million (17.1%) had been uninsured for at least part of the year prior to interview, and 27.2 million (8.7%) had been uninsured for more than a year at the time of interview.
  • Among persons under age 65, 63.2% (169.5 million) were covered by private health insurance plans at the time of interview. This includes 2.1% (5.6 million) covered by private plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges at the time of interview between January and September 2014. The proportion with exchange coverage increased from 1.4% (3.7 million) in the first quarter of 2014 (January–March) to 2.5% (6.8 million) in the third quarter of 2014 (July–September).
  • Among adults aged 18–64, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 20.4% in 2013 to 16.7% in the first 9 months of 2014.
  • Among adults aged 19–25, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 26.5% in 2013 to 20.4% in the first 9 months of 2014.
  • In the first 9 months of 2014, the percentage of persons under age 65 who were uninsured at the time of interview varied by state. For example, 9.1% were uninsured in Pennsylvania, whereas 22.2% were uninsured in Texas.

STATE VITALS: NEW JERSEY

March 20, 2015

The state of New Jersey scores lower than the nation overall in births to unmarried mothers and teen births.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, the garden state has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer’s Disease, diabetes, influenza/pneumonia and suicide.

Here is a list of the 15 leading causes of death in New Jersey in 2012 with ICD 10 codes:

  1. Diseases of heart (I00-I09,I11,I13,I20-I51)
  2. Malignant neoplasms (C00-C97)
  3. Cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69)
  4. Chronic lower respiratory diseases (J40-J47)
  5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) (V01-X59,Y85-Y86)
  6. Diabetes mellitus (E10-E14)
  7. Alzheimer’s disease (G30)
  8. Septicemia (A40-A41)
  9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (N00-N07,N17-N19,N25-N27)
  10. Influenza and pneumonia (J09-J18)
  11. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (I10,I12,I15)
  12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (K70,K73-K74)
  13. Intentional self-harm (suicide) (*U03,X60-X84,Y87.0)
  14. Parkinson’s disease (G20-G21)
  15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids (J69)

Emergency Department Visits and Proximity to Patients’ Residences, 2009–2010

March 19, 2015

The number of emergency department (ED) visits rose 44% from 1991 through 2010, even as the number of hospital EDs declined 10% over the same period.

As a result, EDs have increasingly experienced overcrowding and longer waiting times. Using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a new NCHS report provides how often patients go to the ED closest to their home, and how differences in geography, patient demographics, and hospital characteristics are associated with ED selection patterns.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2009–2010, visits to emergency departments (EDs) occurred an average 6.8 miles from the patient’s residence, while the nearest ED was 3.9 miles from the home.
  • Less than one-half of all ED visits (43.8%) occurred at the ED closest to where the patient lived.
  • Visits within metropolitan statistical areas were less likely (37.2%) to take place at the closest ED compared with visits outside of metropolitan statistical areas (70.1%).
  • Within metropolitan statistical areas, visits that did not take place at the closest ED occurred more frequently among younger patients, at larger hospitals, and in EDs with longer waiting times, compared with visits to the closest ED.

National Kidney Month

March 13, 2015

March is designated National Kidney Month to raise awareness about the prevention and early detection of kidney disease.

In 2013, kidney diseases were the ninth leading cause of death in the United States with 47,112 deaths.  There were about 3.9 million people in the U.S diagnosed with kidney disease making up 1.7% of non-institutionalized adults.

More than 10% (more than 20 million) of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older have chronic kidney disease (CKD), and most of them are unaware of their condition (2,3). Major risk factors for CKD include aging, diabetes, and high blood pressure. If left untreated, CKD can lead to kidney failure, requiring dialysis or transplantation for survival. However, controlling diabetes and high blood pressure can prevent or delay CKD and improve health outcomes.

More Information:

http://nccd.cdc.gov/ckd/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/kidney-disease.htm