STATE VITALS: NEW HAMPSHIRE

March 9, 2015

The state of New Hampshire scores lower than the nation overall in births to unmarried mothers, cesarean deliveries, preterm births and low birthweight.  The state also has the lowest teen birth rate in the country.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, the granite state has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, accidents, Alzheimer’s Disease, and suicide.

 


National Nutrition Month

March 6, 2015

March is National Nutrition Month.  While you may know it is important to eat a healthy diet, it isn’t always easy to sort through all of the information available about nutrition and food choices.

Through the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), NCHS has a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The survey is unique in that it combines interviews and physical examinations.

Findings from this survey will be used to determine the prevalence of major diseases and risk factors for diseases. Information will be used to assess nutritional status and its association with health promotion and disease prevention. NHANES findings are also the basis for national standards for such measurements as height, weight, and blood pressure. Data from this survey will be used in epidemiological studies and health sciences research, which help develop sound public health policy, direct and design health programs and services, and expand the health knowledge for the Nation.

Here some recent findings from NHANES on nutrition:

  • Almost 40% of adults consumed nuts on a given day.
  • More than three-quarters of youth aged 2–19 years (77.1%) consumed fruit on a given day.
  • Almost 92% of youth aged 2–19 years consumed vegetables on a given day.
  • Nine out of 10 children aged 2–5 years consumed fruit, while only 6 out of 10 adolescents consumed fruit on a given day.

Here are some more links on nutrition:

http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm

 

 


Dental Caries and Sealant Prevalence in Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2011–2012

March 5, 2015

Although dental caries has been declining in permanent teeth for many children since the 1960s, previous findings showed caries in primary teeth for preschool children increasing from 24% to 28% between 1988 and 2004. Disparities in caries continue to persist for some race and ethnic groups in the United States. Prevalence of dental sealants—applied to the tooth chewing surfaces to help prevent caries—has also varied among sociodemographic groups.

A new NCHS report describes U.S. youth dental caries and sealant prevalence by race and Hispanic origin for 2011–2012.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Approximately 23% of children aged 2–5 years had dental caries in primary teeth.
  • Untreated tooth decay in primary teeth among children aged 2–8 was twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black children compared with non-Hispanic white children.
  • Among those aged 6–11, 27% of Hispanic children had any dental caries in permanent teeth compared with nearly 18% of non-Hispanic white and Asian children.
  • About three in five adolescents aged 12–19 had experienced dental caries in permanent teeth, and 15% had untreated tooth decay.
  • Dental sealants were more prevalent for non-Hispanic white children (44%) compared with non-Hispanic black and Asian children (31% each) aged 6–11.

 


Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013

March 4, 2015

Drug poisoning (overdose) is the number one cause of injury-related death in the United States, with 43,982 deaths occurring in 2013. While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in the number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin. A recent study using data from 28 states reported that the death rate for heroin overdose doubled from 2010 through 2012.

Using data from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report provides a description of trends and demographics for heroin-related drug-poisoning deaths in the United States from 2000 through 2013.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin nearly quadrupled from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013. Most of the increase occurred after 2010.
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin was nearly four times higher for men (6,525 deaths) than women (1,732 deaths) in 2013.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic black persons aged 45–64 had the highest rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin (2.0 per 100,000). In 2013, non-Hispanic white persons aged 18–44 had the highest rate (7.0 per 100,000).
  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin increased for all regions of the country, with the greatest increase seen in the Midwest.