Insurance Status by State Medicaid Expansion Status: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2013–September 2014

Under the Affordable Care Act, states have the option to expand Medicaid coverage to all eligible persons with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Previous research has shown that there have already been significant decreases in the percentages of persons who were uninsured between 2013 and the first 9 months of 2014.

Using data from 2013 and the second and third quarters (April through September) of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a new NCHS report examines changes in the percentage of persons who were uninsured, by state Medicaid expansion status, age, and poverty status.

Data from the second and third quarters of the 2014 NHIS were chosen for this analysis because they capture the surge in enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace and state-based exchange plans that occurred in March and the beginning of April 2014. Data from the fourth quarter of the 2014 NHIS are not yet available.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The percentage of adults aged 18–64 who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 20.4% in 2013 to 15.9% in April–September 2014.
  • Adults aged 18–64 with family incomes less than or equal to 138% of the FPL in Medicaid expansion states had a larger decrease in the percentage uninsured (10.2 percentage points) than those with similar income in nonexpansion states (3.3 percentage points) from 2013 to April–September 2014.
  • Between 2013 and April–September 2014, the percentage of uninsured adults aged 18–34 with incomes less than or equal to 138% FPL decreased 9.1 percentage points in Medicaid expansion states, compared with only 0.7 percentage points in nonexpansion states.
  • The greatest absolute decrease in the percentage uninsured from 2013 to April–September 2014 (12.1 percentage points) was among adults aged 45–64 with incomes less than or equal to 138% FPL in Medicaid expansion states.

 

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