Physician Office Visits by Children for Well and Problem-focused Care: United States, 2012

May 20, 2016

 

Office visits by children can be for well or problem-focused care. Well-care visits for children routinely include assessment of emotional and social development, in addition to physical health and development.

Problem-focused visits do not routinely include these comprehensive assessments. Receipt of well care is tracked nationally as a measure of health care quality.

An NCHS report describes physician office visits for well and problem-focused care among children under age 18 years. This analysis complements the information on children’s visits contained in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) 2012 online tables.

Findings:

  • Physician office visit rates for well care were lower for school-aged (those aged 6–11 years) children (31 per 100 population) and adolescents aged 12–17 years (29 per 100 population) than for younger children (349 and 74 per 100 population for children under age 1 year and 1–5 years, respectively).
  • Visit rates for well and problem-focused care were highest for general pediatricians (59 and 173 per 100 population) compared with other primary (7 and 25 per 100 population) and specialty care providers (1 and 24 per 100 population) across all age groups.
  • Among school-aged and adolescent children, a higher percentage of well-care visits had recommended height, weight, and blood pressure measurements recorded, compared with visits for problem-focused care.

 

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Health of Asian Adults: United States, 2010–2014

May 20, 2016

About 5% of the U.S. population, or 15 million persons, are Asian. The Asian population is heterogeneous, characterized by a variety of languages, cultures, socioeconomic statuses, and health issues.

A new NCHS report looks at the health status, multiple chronic conditions, serious psychological distress, and limitations on work or social participation for all non-Hispanic Asian adults and the six largest Asian subgroups: Chinese, Filipino, Asian Indian, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Korean. Estimates for all U.S. adults are also shown.

Findings:

  • Non-Hispanic Asian adults were less likely than all U.S. adults to be in fair or poor health, have multiple chronic conditions, have serious psychological distress in the past 30 days, or be limited in work or social participation.
  • Chinese adults reported better health on all five measures in this report compared with all U.S. adults.
  • Chinese adults (11.3%) were less likely than Filipino (22.3%), Asian Indian (16.9%), Japanese (16.8%), or Vietnamese (15.6%) adults to have multiple chronic conditions.
  • Chinese (1.8%) and Asian Indian (1.5%) adults were about one-half as likely as Japanese adults (4.1%) to have a work limitation.
  • Chinese (2.4%), Japanese (2.2%), and Vietnamese (2.4%) adults were about one-half as likely as Korean adults (4.6%) to be limited in social participation.

 


Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, July–December 2015

May 11, 2016

wireless_201605Preliminary results from the July– December 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow.

Nearly one-half of American homes (48.3%) had only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the second half of 2015—an increase of 2.9 percentage points since the second half of 2014.

More than two-thirds of all adults aged 25-34 and of adults renting their homes were living in wireless-only households.

A new NCHS report presents the most up-to-date estimates available from the federal government concerning the size and characteristics of this population.


Access and Utilization of Selected Preventive Health Services Among Adolescents Aged 10–17

May 11, 2016

Adolescence is a critical period for health promotion, disease prevention, and the development of healthy habits.

Regular preventive health care visits during this period are recommended to promote health and quality of life.

An NCHS report examines recent trends and demographic differences in the percentages of adolescents with a usual place for preventive care; those who had a well-child checkup in the past 12 months; and those who had a dental visit in the past 12 months.

Findings:

  • The percentages of adolescents aged 10–17 who did not have a usual place for preventive care, did not receive a well-child checkup in the past 12 months, or did not have a dental visit in the past 12 months decreased from 2008 to 2014.
  • In 2014, 2% of adolescents aged 10–17 did not have a usual place for preventive care, 21% did not receive a well-child checkup, and 12% did not have a dental visit in the past 12 months.
  • In 2014, the percentages of adolescents not having a usual place for preventive care, not receiving a well-child checkup, and not having a dental visit were higher for those aged 16–17 compared with those in younger age groups. These percentages also varied by race and ethnicity, poverty status, and insurance status.

State Variation in Health Care Service Utilization: United States, 2014

May 5, 2016

State-level differences in the percentage of uninsured Americans, along with other factors, may affect health care access and utilization.

An NCHS report examines the prevalence of two health care utilization measures among adults aged 18–64 by state. Additionally, differences by Medicaid expansion status and state Health Insurance Marketplace type are examined.

Findings: 

  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care ranged from 2.8% in Vermont to 26.7% in Nevada.
  • The percentage of adults who did not have a general doctor visit in the past 12 months ranged from 15.9% in Vermont to 48.1% in Montana.
  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care was lower in states that expanded Medicaid compared with nonexpansion states.
  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care or who did not see a general doctor in the past 12 months was lower in states with partnership marketplaces compared with Federally Facilitated Marketplace states.

Access to Care Among Adults Aged 18–64 With Serious Psychological Distress

May 5, 2016

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Between 2013 and the first 9 months of 2015 almost 15 million adults aged 18–64 gained health insurance coverage in the United States. In monitoring the effects of this shift in coverage, one population of special interest is those with mental health conditions.

Previous studies have shown adults with mental health conditions have greater health care needs and are at higher risk for poor health outcomes, but may have reduced access to services.

A new NCHS report provides estimates of health care access and utilization for adults aged 18–64 with and without serious psychological distress in the past 30 days, an indicator of mental health problems severe enough to cause moderate-to-serious impairment in social, occupational, or school functioning and to require treatment. Estimates were based on data from the National Health Interview Survey for January 2012 through September 2015.

Findings:

  • Among adults aged 18–64 with serious psychological distress, the percentage who were uninsured decreased from 28.1% in 2012 to 19.5% in the first 9 months of 2015. Adults without serious psychological distress saw a decrease in the percentage of uninsured from 20.3% in 2012 to 12.3% in the first 9 months of 2015.
  • Although more adults with serious psychological distress have public rather than private coverage, the percentage with public coverage has remained relatively stable from 2012 through the first 9 months of 2015 while the percentage with private coverage has increased over the same time
    period.
  • The percentage of adults with serious psychological distress who have seen a mental health care professional in the past 12 months has declined from 2012 to the first 9 months of 2015.
  • In the first 9 months of 2015, 24.4% of adults with serious psychological distress and 6.1% of those without serious psychological distress had not received needed medical care due to cost.
  • The percentage of adults with serious psychological distress who needed mental health care but could not afford it declined from 2012 to the first 9 months of 2015.