QuickStats: Percentage of Total Daily Kilocalories Consumed from Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Among Children and Adults, by Sex and Income Level

February 21, 2017

During 2011–2014, on average, 7.3% of boys’ and 7.2% of girls’ total daily calories were obtained from Sugar Sweetened Beverages (SSB) compared with 6.9% for men and 6.1% for women.

For men, women, and girls, the percentage of total daily kilocalories from SSBs declined as income level increased.

For boys, the percentage of total daily kilocalories was lower for those in the highest income group than in the other income groups. Compared with women, a larger proportion of men’s total daily kilocalorie intake came from SSBs.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6606a8.htm


Characteristics of Primary Care Physicians in Patient-centered Medical Home Practices: United States, 2013

February 17, 2017

Questions for Esther Hing, Survey Statistician and Lead Author on “Characteristics of Primary Care Physicians in Patient-Centered Medical Home Practices: United States, 2013

Q: Can you define what a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practice is?

EH: One of several PCMH definitions is that PCMHs provide care that is: comprehensive care provided by a team of providers, patient-centered care, coordinated care, has accessible services, and care focused on quality and safety.


Q: Why did you decide to do a report on PCMH practices?

EH: Although the PCMH has been advocated by the “primary care community” for more than a decade, there are no national estimates that describe characteristics of this model of care delivery. “Primary care community” includes primary care physicians as well as other primary care providers and associated professional societies. The report, based on questions funded by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), will inform policy makers of the prevalence of certified PCMH practices in the United States, as well as care attributes of these practices (compared with non-PCMH practices).

Estimates not only serve as benchmark estimates for this model of primary care, but adds to the knowledge base about this type of practice. Payers and the federal government have increasingly funded PCMH demonstrations, and certain payers and states have also increased funding to practitioners in PCMH practices.


Q: Is the first time NCHS has published a report on this topic?

EH: Yes, this is the first year that the PCMH questions have been reported.


Q: What did your report find on primary care physicians in PCMH practices?

EH: The report found that primary care physicians in PCMH practices tended to be in larger practices, and located in urban areas. These findings may be attributed to infrastructure requirements needed for PCMH care delivery. It may also reflect that in 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS) demonstrations and payment policy supporting chronic care was not yet implemented or was in early stages of development.


Q: Were there any findings that surprised you?

EH: The finding that a substantial percentage of non-PCMH practices have non- physician clinicians and Electronic Health Records suggests that there is untapped potential for a greater number of primary care practices to become PCMHs.

However, the relatively lower participation by solo and small practices as PCMHs suggests the need for assistance or coaching to make this transformation. The ongoing implementation of payment incentives from CMS and elsewhere has encouraged growth of PCMHs. This is a trend that the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) can be used to examine for the next few years and beyond.


U.S. Heart Attack Deaths from 2010-2015

February 15, 2017
Year
Deaths
2010
122,071
2011
119,905
2012
117,944
2013
116,793
2014
114,019
2015
114,023
TOTAL
704,755

 Source: http://wonder.cdc.gov

ICD-10: Acute myocardial infarction (I21-I22)

 


Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-September 2016

February 14, 2017
Michael Martinez, M.P.H., M.H.S.A., Epidemiologist and Health Statistician

Michael Martinez, M.P.H., M.H.S.A., Epidemiologist and Health Statistician

Questions for Michael Martinez, M.P.H., M.H.S.A., Epidemiologist, Health Statistician and Lead Author on “Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-September 2016

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in your new study?

MM: I think the most significant finding in this study is the snapshot view of varied health insurance types. While from January through September 2016, among adults aged 18 to 64, 12.3% were uninsured at the time of interview, 20.3% had public coverage, and 69.0% had private health insurance coverage. Among the 136.0 million adults in this age group with private coverage, 9.3 million–or 4.7%–were covered by private health insurance plans obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges during the first 9 months of 2016.


Q: How did health insurance coverage in the United States compare in the first 9 months of 2016 to 2015 and 2010?

MM: We’ve observed a number of changes in health insurance coverage between 2010 and 2015 compared to the first 9 months of 2016. Between 2010 and the first 9 months of 2016, 20.4 million persons of all ages gained coverage. In the first 9 months of 2016, 28.2 million (8.8%) persons of all ages were uninsured at the time of interview, compared with 48.6 million (16.0%) persons in 2010 and 28.6 million (9.1%) persons in 2015. The difference in uninsured estimates between 2015 and the first 9 months of 2016 was not significant.


Q: Where do high-deductible plans through private health insurance fit into 2016 estimates compared to earlier years?

MM: Among private health insurance plans, enrollment in high-deductible health plans has been increasing in recent years. 39.1% of persons under age 65 with private health insurance were enrolled in high-deductible health plans in the first 9 months of 2016. This percentage has increased significantly, from 25.3% in 2010 and from 36.7% in 2015.


Q: What are the trends among race and ethnicity groups in health insurance coverage this year and compared over time?

MM: There’s been quite a bit of change in health insurance coverage among race and ethnicity groups over the years. For example, in the first 9 months of 2016, 24.7% of Hispanic, 15.1% of non-Hispanic black, 8.5% of non-Hispanic white, and 7.8% of non-Hispanic Asian adults aged 18–64 lacked health insurance coverage at the time of interview. Significant decreases in the percentage of uninsured adults were observed between 2013 and the first 9 months of 2016 for Hispanic, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic Asian adults. Hispanic adults had the greatest percentage point decrease in the uninsured rate between 2013 (40.6%) and the first 9 months of 2016 (24.7%).


Q: How is health insurance coverage looking this year for our youngest population – children under 18 years of age?

MM: From January through September 2016, among children under 18 years of age, 5.0% were uninsured at the time of interview, 43.4% had public coverage, and 53.5% had private health insurance coverage. Among the 39.3 million children under 18 years of age with private coverage, 1.7 million or 2.3% were covered by private health insurance plans obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges during the first 9 months of 2016.