QuickStats: Percentage of U.S. Women Aged 50–74 Years Who Have Ever Had Breast Cancer by Race and Hispanic Origin

January 25, 2019

During 2015–2017, 5.3% of U.S. women aged 50–74 years had ever been told they had breast cancer.

Non-Hispanic white women were more likely to have ever been told they had breast cancer (6.1%) compared with Hispanic women (3.2%) and non-Hispanic black women (3.6%).

There was no significant difference in the prevalence of breast cancer between Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6803a6.htm

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Characteristics of Office-based Physician Visits, 2016

January 24, 2019

A new NCHS report examines visit rates by age and sex. It also examines visit characteristics—including insurance status, reason for visit, and services—by age. Estimates use data from the 2016 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

Key Findings:

  • In 2016, there were an estimated 278 office-based physician visits per 100 persons.
  • The visit rate among females exceeded the rate for males, and the rates for both infants and older adults exceeded the rates for those aged 1–64 years.
  • Private insurance was the primary expected source of payment for the majority of visits by children under age 18 and adults aged 18–64, whereas Medicare was the primary expected source of payment for the majority of visits by adults aged 65 and over.
  • Compared with adults, a larger percentage of visits by children were for either preventive care or a new problem.
  • Compared with children, a larger percentage of visits by adults included an imaging service that was ordered or provided.

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Had an Influenza Vaccination† in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Current Asthma Status

January 18, 2019

In 2017, adults aged 18–64 years with current asthma were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months (47.9%) than those without asthma (36.4%).

Regardless of asthma status, women were more likely than men to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.

Women aged 18–64 years with current asthma (51.3%) were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination than men with current asthma in this age group (41.6%).

Among adults aged 18–64 years without asthma, women also were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination (40.0%) than were men (32.8%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6802a7.htm


Updated Provisional Drug Overdose Death Data: 12-Month Ending from June 2017-June 2018

January 16, 2019

Link: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Deaths from Cancer of the Cervix Uteri, 1999-2017

January 14, 2019

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SOURCE:  CDC WONDER, ICD-10 codes:  C53.0, C53.1, C53.8, C53.9


QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits Made by Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Among Persons Aged 18 Years or Older, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

January 11, 2019

During 2015–2016, 3.5% of adult visits to the emergency department were made by those with chronic kidney disease.

A higher percentage of visits were made by men with chronic kidney disease than women (4.1% compared with 2.7%).

The same pattern was observed for non-Hispanic black men (5.0%) and women (2.4%).

Although the pattern was similar, there was no statistically significant difference in emergency department visits by sex for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015–2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6801a7.htm


Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017

January 10, 2019

Questions for Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author of “Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on the total fertility rate in the United States?

BH: We produced this report because we were interested in what differences there were in the total fertility rate (TFR) by state and population group (race and Hispanic origin). This report presents the TFR for each state in 2017, both overall and for the three largest population groups — non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic. As noted in the report, fertility levels affect the size and composition of the population, and family size is associated with female labor force participation and economic growth, as well as other social and economic changes.


Q: Can you explain what the total fertility rate is and how is it different from the general fertility rate and crude birth rate?

BH: The total fertility rate is the number of births expected for a (hypothetical) group of 1,000 women over their lifetime, assuming the current age-specific birth rate hold. The crude birth rate and general fertility rate measure the number of births occurring for either the whole population or the population of women in their childbearing years (ages 15-44 year) in a given year. The TFR, on the other hand, estimates the number of births for women over a generation. For that reason, the TFR can be used to ascertain whether the number of births is at “replacement,” that is, the level at which a given group of women can exactly replace themselves (generally considered to be 2,100 births per 1,000 women for the TFR).


Q: How did total fertility rates vary by state and race in 2017?

BH: Differences in the total fertility rates among the states by race and Hispanic origin were considerable. For non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah (2,099.5, the highest) was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia (1,012.0, the lowest). For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine (4,003.5) was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming (1,146.0). For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama (3,085.0) was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont (1,200.5). In addition, there were no states with TFRs above replacement for non-Hispanic white women in 2017. However, for non-Hispanic black women, the TFRs for 12 states was above replacement. The TFRs for Hispanic women were above replacement in 29 states.


Q: Do you have trend data on total fertility rates that goes back 10 or 20 years?

BH: The report includes only data for 2017. However, trend data for the total fertility rate at the national level, by race and Hispanic origin group, are available from Births: Final Data for 2017 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf), Births: Final Data for 2015 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf), and Trends and Variations in Reproduction and Intrinsic Rates: United States, 1990-2014 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_02.pdf). In general, the TFR has declined over the last six decades, with the TFR being below replacement for all but two years (2006 and 2007) since 1971. In 2017, the rates for all groups were below replacement.


Q: Is there a finding in this report that surprised you?

BH: The range between the highest and lowest total fertility rate among the states by race and Hispanic origin groups is noteworthy. As we mentioned, for non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia. For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming. For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont.