NCHS Welcomes Dr. Moyer as its New Center Director

March 31, 2020

Brian Moyer, Ph.D., M.A., has been named the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) effective March 30, 2020.

Dr. Moyer has been serving as Director of the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) since September 2014 and as Acting Under Secretary for Economic Affairs, which oversees BEA, for the U.S. Department of Commerce since December 2018.

For more information on Dr. Moyer click here.


Fact or Fiction – Have maternal deaths in the United States been on the rise over the past several years?

March 30, 2020

Source: National Vital Statistics System, 2018

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/maternal-mortality/index.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Who Had a Severe Headache or Migraine in the Past 3 Months, by Sex and Age Group

March 27, 2020

In 2018, women were nearly twice as likely as men to have had a severe headache or migraine in the past 3 months (20.1% versus 10.6%), both overall and within each age group.

The percentage of persons experiencing severe headache or migraine declined with age for both men and women, from 25.5% among those aged 18–44 years to 7.6% among those aged 75 years or older for women and from 12.3% among those aged 18–44 years to 4.0% among those aged 75 years or older for men.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912a8.htm


Selected Causes of Death in the U.S., 2018

March 26, 2020

As the death toll from COVID-19 in the United States exceeds 1,000, NCHS has been frequently asked about what are some other causes of death that fall into this range.  Below is a list of selected causes of death that killed between 1,000 and 2,000 people in the U.S. during 2018, the most recent complete year of data that are available.

Selected Causes of Death, United States, 2018

 


Trends and Characteristics of Sexually Transmitted Infections During Pregnancy: United States, 2016-2018

March 26, 2020

Questions for Elizabeth Gregory, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Trends and Characteristics of Sexually Transmitted Infections During Pregnancy: United States, 2016-2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to a study on sexually transmitted infections (STI) during pregnancy?

EG: Maternal STIs during pregnancy are infrequently reported but important health issues given the potential for negative health outcomes for both women and infants. However, there have been limited studies on the prevalence and characteristics of women with STIs during pregnancy.  Data on chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis were new to the 2003 revision of the birth certificate, and with all jurisdictions using the 2003 birth certificate revision starting in 2016, we decided to look at trends and rates of these STIs by selected characteristics.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

EG: Birth certificate data for 2016–2018 were analyzed for trends, while a more detailed analysis was conducted using 2018 data.


Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by rates by selected characteristics?

EG: The rates for the three maternal STIs studied increased 2% (chlamydia), 16% (gonorrhea), and 34% (syphilis), from 2016 through 2018.  In 2018, rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea decreased with advancing maternal age whereas those for syphilis by maternal age decreased with age through 30-34 years and then increased for women aged 35 and older.  In 2018, rates of all three STIs were highest for non-Hispanic black women, women who smoked during pregnancy, women who received late or no prenatal care, and women for whom Medicaid was the principal source of payment for the delivery.  Among women aged 25 and over, rates of each of the STIs decreased with increasing maternal education.


Q: Do you have data that goes back further than 2016?

EG: Due to the staggered implementation of the 2003 revision of the birth certificate by the states, 2016 is the first data year for which we have national data on these items.  We do have data for earlier years, but they are subnational.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

EG: The rates for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis increased from 2016 through 2018.  Rates for these STIs varied by selected characteristics, but were generally highest among younger women, non-Hispanic black women, women who smoked during pregnancy, women who received late or no prenatal care, and women for whom Medicaid was the principal source of payment for the delivery.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Met Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening Recommendations — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2018

March 20, 2020

March is Colorectal Awareness Month. 67% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years met the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Most persons (60.6%) had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years. Cancer screening leads to early detection, and early detection saves lives.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6911a7.htm


Fact or Fiction – Are Flu and pneumonia are responsible for 57,000 deaths in the United States each year?

March 17, 2020

Source: National Vital Statistics System, 1999-2018

https://wonder.cdc.gov