2010 was the only year since 1999 without an accidental fireworks death in July

June 30, 2020

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QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Currently Have Asthma by Sex and Race/Ethnicity

June 26, 2020

During 2017–2018, women aged 18 years or older were more likely than men (9.7% versus 5.5%) to currently have asthma.

This pattern prevailed in each of the race/ethnicity groups: Hispanic adults (7.8% versus 3.9%); non-Hispanic white adults (10.3% versus 5.9%); non-Hispanic black adults (11.4% versus 6.2%); and non-Hispanic Asian adults (5.0% versus 3.3%).

Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men were more likely to currently have asthma than were Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian men.

The same pattern existed among women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017–2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6925a7.htm


Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017

June 25, 2020

Questions for Anne Driscoll, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017.”

Q: What is difference between maternal age distribution and maternal age-specific infant mortality rates?

AD: “Maternal age distribution” refers to the percentage of women with a birth in each maternal age category; for example, the percentage who are 15-19 years old, the percentage who are 20-24 years old. The “maternal age-specific infant mortality rate” is the mortality rate of infants born to women in a given maternal age category; for example, the mortality rate of infants born to women who were 20-24 years old.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AD: It was somewhat surprising that changes in maternal age distribution mattered little or not at all for the mortality trends for infants born to non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women given the significant changes in the maternal age distribution for both groups during the study period.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AD: The data are from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS); we used natality data sets and infant mortality data sets from 2000-2017. Natality data sets are comprised of information from all birth certificates in a given year; infant mortality data sets are comprised of information from all death certificates to persons under one year of age in a given year.


Q: What is the take home message for this report? (The reporter could also say “Any other comments?”)

AD: Changes in the age distribution of women giving birth accounted for about one-third of the decline in infant mortality rates from 2000 through 2017 while declines in maternal age-specific mortality rates accounted for about two-thirds of this decline. However, these patterns varied markedly by race and Hispanic origin.


Prevalence of Prescription Pain Medication Use Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018

June 24, 2020

FROM THE AUTHOR

In 2015–2018, 10.7% of U.S. adults used one or more prescription pain medications in the past 30 days.  Prescription pain medication use was higher among women than men overall and within each age category. Use increased with age overall and among men and women. Prescription pain medication use was lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults, and use among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults. This same pattern of prescription pain medication use was observed among both men and women.

Additionally, this report estimated the percentage of adults who used one or more opioid prescription pain medications (with or without use of non-opioid prescription pain medications) and the percentage who used one ore more non-opioid prescription pain medication (without use of prescription opioids).  In 2015–2018, 5.7% of U.S. adults used prescription opioids and 5.0% used non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) in the past 30 days. Use of one or more prescription opioids and use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) were higher among women than men, and increased with age, and were lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults.  Use of one or more prescription opioids among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults.

From 2009–2010 to 2017–2018, there was no significant increase in use of prescription opioids, but use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) increased.

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018.


Lightning Deaths in United States from 1999-2018

June 22, 2020

Source: CDC WONDER https://wonder.cdc.gov 

 


QuickStats: Reason for the Most Recent Colonoscopy Among Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Had a Test in the Past 10 Years

June 19, 2020

In 2018, 60.6% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years without a personal history of colorectal cancer had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years.

Of these, 81.2% had their most recent colonoscopy as part of routine screening, 10.6% had their most recent colonoscopy because of a problem, 5.2% as a follow-up to an earlier test or screening exam, and 2.8% for some other reason.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6924a5.htm


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru November 2019)

June 17, 2020

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Prevalence of Tooth Loss Among Older Adults: United States, 2015–2018

June 17, 2020

Questions for Eleanor Fleming, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Prevalence of Tooth Loss Among Older Adults: United States, 2015–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on tooth loss among older U.S. adults?

EF: Tooth loss among older U.S. adults is an important public health issue. Reducing complete tooth loss is a national health goal monitored by Healthy People. From a health perspective, tooth loss diminishes quality of life, impacts nutrition as food choices are limited, and can impede social interactions. Tooth loss is also preventable.


Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and education?

EF: While the prevalence of complete tooth loss has been diminishing since the 1960s, in other words, older adults are retaining their teeth; in 2015-2018, disparities continue to persist. Overall, the prevalence of complete tooth loss was 12.9%. We found differences in the prevalence of complete tooth loss by sex, age, race and Hispanic origin, and education.

The prevalence of complete tooth loss among adults aged 65 and over and increased with age: 8.9% (aged 65–69), 10.6% (70–74), and 17.8% (75 and over). There were also differences among women and men by age. Among women, prevalence increased in a similar pattern with age (6.9% for adults aged 65–69, 11.7% for 70–74, and 16.6% for 75 and over). There was a different pattern among men. Among men, complete tooth loss was higher in the oldest age group (19.5% for 75 and over) compared with the two younger groups (11.1% and 9.4%, respectively, for those aged 65–69 and 70–74). There were no observed significant differences in the prevalence between men and women.

By race and Hispanic origin, the prevalence of complete tooth loss is similar to patterns that we see in other oral health and health outcomes. There are differences among race and Hispanic and origin. Non-Hispanic black older adults (25.4%) had the highest prevalence of complete tooth loss compared with other race and Hispanic-origin groups. Among men, prevalence was also higher among non-Hispanic black men (23.4%) compared with non-Hispanic white (12.5%) and Hispanic (11.9%) men. Among women, prevalence of complete tooth loss was higher in non-Hispanic black women (26.8%) compared with Hispanic (17.8%) and non-Hispanic white (9.5%) women.

We also found differences in the prevalence of complete tooth loss among older adults by education level. We defined education in terms of less than a high education and a high school education or greater. Adults with less than a high school education had a higher prevalence of complete tooth loss (31.9%) compared with adults with a high school education of greater (9.5%).


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

EF: The statistical difference between Hispanic men and women was the most surprising finding in this report. It was not surprising that we observed the prevalence of complete tooth loss to be higher among Hispanic women (17.8%) compared to non-Hispanic women (9.5%). Nor, was it surprising that the prevalence of complete tooth loss among Hispanic men (11.9%) was lower compared to non-Hispanic white men (12.5%). However, a statistical difference Hispanic men and women was not expected.

When you look at the prevalence tooth loss by age among men and women, it is also striking that there were no statistical differences between men and women. While the pattern of estimates with age was difference, none of these differences were statistically different. One would hope to see either a similar pattern or statistical differences. Finding neither is striking.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

EF: This report used National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, survey years 1999-2000 to 2017-2018. The survey includes an oral health examination, where dental examiners who are trained and licensed to practice in the United States conduct a tooth count. They assess whether a tooth is present or absence or all 32 teeth. We used these data to assess the absence of teeth in all teeth. Because the protocol for assess tooth count was similar in the survey years, we could combine the data. It should be noted, however, that protocols for the tooth count were similar, the dental examiners were not always dentists; licensed dental hygienists collected data for certain survey cycles.


Q: Is there any trend data that goes back further than 1999?

EF: This report includes trend data starting at 1999 with continuous data, meaning that survey has collected data continuously. While the oral health component has been part of the survey since its inception in 1959, we focused on these more recent, continuous data.

From 1999–2000 through 2017–2018, the age-adjusted prevalence of complete tooth loss decreased from 29.9% to 13.1%. The prevalence has decreased for both men and women.


Q: What is the take home message for this report? (The reporter could also say “Any other comments?”)

EF: Overall, the prevalence of complete tooth loss among adults aged 65 and over was 12.9%, and the age-adjusted prevalence has decreased since 1999-2000. This is great news, as more older adults are retaining their teeth. However, for 12.9% of older adults to be without their teeth has tremendously public health importance and signals that additional work is needed.


QuickStats: Percentage of Families That Did Not Get Needed Medical Care Because of Cost by Poverty Status

June 12, 2020

The percentage of all families that did not get needed medical care because of cost in the past 12 months decreased from 12.1% in 2013 to 9.7% 2018.

From 2013 to 2018, the percentage of poor families that did not get medical care decreased (22.7% to 17.3%) as did the percentage of near-poor families (20.4% to 16.0%); no significant change occurred for not-poor families (7.1% and 6.6%).

In 2013 and 2018, the percentage of families that did not get needed medical care because of cost was lowest among the not poor.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2013 and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6923a4.htm


Hearing Difficulty, Vision Trouble, and Balance Problems Among Male Veterans and Nonveterans

June 12, 2020

Questions for Jacqueline Lucas, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Hearing Difficulty, Vision Trouble, and Balance Problems Among Male Veterans and Nonveterans.”

Q: Why does NCHS conduct studies on U.S. Veterans?

JL: Veterans are known to differ in their health and health care access and utilization from non-veterans. NCHS surveys are uniquely positioned to collect information on all US veterans in the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States.


Q: Why did you specifically focus on male Veterans?

JL: We focused on male veterans in the report because of the small number of female veterans in the 2016 NHIS.


Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by male Veterans and nonveterans?

JL: Male veterans were more likely to have hearing difficulty (a little/moderate hearing difficulty, as well as a lot of hearing difficulty or to be deaf), dual sensory impairment (vision trouble and hearing difficulty), and balance problems than nonveterans. When we looked at the data by age, younger veterans were more likely to hearing difficulty compared with nonveterans in comparable age groups.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

JL: We hadn’t seen much in the literature about balance problems in veterans, so we were surprised to see that veterans were more likely to have balance problems than nonveterans. Additionally, we were surprised to see that male veterans aged 18-44 were 3 times more likely to have a little or moderate hearing trouble than nonveterans in the same age group.


Q: What is the take home message for this report? (The reporter could also say “Any other comments?”)

JL: We’ve tended to think of veterans with health concerns as older men who served years ago in earlier conflicts. The population of post 9/11 veterans is increasing relative to the population of veterans from previous combat cohorts. This includes younger veterans whose serviced in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). Our findings can be a starting point for expanded research into other demographic and health comorbidities that may be related to hearing loss and other sensory impairments in veterans.