Births Rose for the First Time in Seven Years in 2021

May 24, 2022

The number of births in the United States and the general fertility rate increased for the first time in seven years during 2021. The data released today are featured by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The new report, “Births: Provisional Data for 2021,” analyzes data from more than 99% of birth certificates issued during the year. The report shows a 1% increase in births from 2020, with 3,659,289 births recorded in 2021. The general fertility rate in 2021 was 56.6 births per 1,000 women ages 15–44, also up 1% from 2020. In contrast, the number of births and general fertility rate both declined 4% from 2019 to 2020.

Other findings in the new report:

  • Birth rates declined for women in the age groups between 15 and 24 years, rose for women in the age groups between 25 and 49 years, and were unchanged for adolescents aged 10-14 in 2021.
  • The birth rate for teenagers ages 15–19 declined by 6% in 2021 to 14.4 births per 1,000 females.
  • The teen birth rate has declined every year except for two (2006 and 2007) since 1991. The rates declined in 2021 for both younger (ages 15–17) and older (ages 18–19) teenagers.
  • The cesarean delivery rate increased to 32.1% in 2021. The low-risk cesarean delivery rate
    increased to 26.3%.
  • The preterm birth rate rose 4% in 2021 to 10.48%—the highest rate reported since at least 2007

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥18 Years Who Felt That Crime Makes It Unsafe to Walk, by Sex and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2020

May 20, 2022

In 2020, 11.0% of adults aged ≥18 years felt that crime made it unsafe for them to walk. Percentages were lower for men (8.9%) than for women (13.0%).

Men were less likely than women to feel unsafe walking because of crime in all age groups (18–24 years: 9.3% of men compared with 17.1% of women; 25–44 years: 10.1% of men compared with 14.1% of women; 45–64 years: 8.9% of men compared with 12.7% of women; ≥65 years: 6.5% of men compared with 9.9% of women).

Among both sexes, adults aged ≥65 years were less likely to feel unsafe to walk than those in younger age groups.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7120a5.htm


Biggest Increase in the Marriage Rate During 2020 Occurred in… Montana?

May 16, 2022

There were many social and health markers that were significantly disrupted in 2020 with the arrival of the pandemic.  Increases in mortality and declines in people seeking medical care during 2020 are well-documented, as is the sharp decline in fertility.   Employment levels and other economic indicators were greatly impacted, as was the workplace itself.  Education at all levels was faced with unprecedented challenges in 2020. 

Another social marker greatly impacted by the pandemic was marriage in the United States.  The number of marriages in the country declined 16.8% between 2019 and 2020, from 2,015,603 to 1,676,911¹.  The 2020 number of marriages is the lowest recorded in the U.S. since 1963².  The marriage rate (the number of marriages per 1,000 population) fell 16.4% from 2019 to 2020, from 6.1 marriages per 1,000 to 5.1 per 1,000.

WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS DIDN’T HAPPEN AS MUCH IN 2020

At the state level, the declines in marriage rates were widespread³ – 46 states and the District of Columbia saw declines in marriage during 2020.  The biggest declines occurred in the following states: Hawaii (47.9%), California (43.9%), New Mexico (43.3%), New York (37.5%) and Louisiana (33.3%).  All the declines were statistically significant except for in three states:  Idaho, South Dakota, and Wyoming, where declines were only 2%.

The highest marriage rate in the U.S. in 2020, as in years past, belonged to Nevada – but the rate was down 18.9% in that state from 2019.

There were also four states in which the marriage rate increased in 2020: Montana (31.6%), Texas (8.2%), Alabama (7.5%) and Utah (3.7%).

Some of the changes in 2020 may be partly due to reporting issues, which also became a factor during the pandemic.

State-by-state comparisons are available on the CDC/NCHS web site at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm

¹ CDC/NCHS Vital Statistics System, https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/national-marriage-divorce-rates-00-20.pdf

² CDC/NCHS Vital Statistics System, https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/mvsr/supp/mv43_12s.pdf

³ CDC/NCHS Vital Statistics System, https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/dvs/state-marriage-rates-90-95-99-20.pdf


QuickStats: Percentage of Suicides and Homicides Involving a Firearm Among Persons Aged ≥10 Years, by Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2020

May 13, 2022

In 2020, among persons aged ≥10 years, the percentage of suicide deaths that involved a firearm was lowest among those aged 25–44 years (45.1%) and highest among those aged ≥65 years (70.8%).

The percentage of homicide deaths that involved a firearm decreased with age, from 91.6% among those aged 10–24 years to 46.0% among those aged ≥65 years.

Persons aged ≥65 years had the highest percentage of suicide deaths that involved a firearm but the lowest percentage of homicide deaths that involved a firearm.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7119a5.htm


Telemedicine Use in Children Aged 0–17 Years: United States, July–December 2020

May 10, 2022

Questions for Maria Villarroel, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Telemedicine Use in Children Aged 0–17 Years: United States, July–December 2020.”

Q: Why did you decide to look at telemedicine among U.S. children during the pandemic?

MV: We know that telemedicine use expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine became a key practice in health care that supports social distancing and decreases contact between health care staff and other patients for the receipt of health care services and reduce the spread of infection. However, there are limited estimates of telemedicine use, especially in children, and this report aims to address that gap.


Q: How did the data vary by age groups, income level and region?

MV: We examined telemedicine use in two ways: 1) telemedicine use in the past 12 months from the time of interview in July-December 2020, so this included both pre-pandemic and pandemic periods; and 2) telemedicine use because of reasons related to the coronavirus pandemic during the first year of the pandemic – 2020.

We found that telemedicine use in the past 12 months varied by age of the child and family income. Telemedicine use in the past 12 months was highest for younger children (aged 4 years and under) and older children (12 to 17 years), and lowest for children aged 5 to 11 years.  Telemedicine use in the past 12 months was highest for children with family incomes below the federal poverty level and at or above 400% of the federal poverty level, and lowest for children with family incomes at 100%–199% of the federal poverty level.  Although not statistically significant, a similar pattern by age was observed for telemedicine use due the pandemic, while telemedicine use due to the pandemic was highest for children with family income at or above 400% of the federal poverty level.

Telemedicine use in the past 12 months and telemedicine use because of the pandemic varied by region. Children living in the Northeast were more likely to have used telemedicine than children living in the Midwest and South regions, and similarly as likely to have used telemedicine as children living in the West region. 


Q: How did telemedicine use vary between urban and rural areas?

MV: In this study, we used the NCHS Urban–Rural Classification Scheme for Counties to classify urbanization level, and we compared telemedicine use in children living in large metropolitan areas, medium and small metropolitan areas, and nonmetropolitan areas.

We found that both telemedicine use in the past 12 months and telemedicine use because of the pandemic were lower in nonmetropolitan areas compared with metropolitan areas. But we also observed that the percentage point difference between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas was wider for the use of telemedicine because of the pandemic than for telemedicine use in the past 12 months. For example, we observed that children residing in metropolitan areas were more than two times as likely to have use of telemedicine because of the pandemic compared with children residing nonmetropolitan areas, but children in metropolitan areas were only about 1.3 to 1.4 more likely than children in nonmetropolitan areas to have used telemedicine in the past 12 months.   


Q: Do you have comparative trend data that goes further back than the second half of 2020?

MV: No. Telemedicine questions were introduced into the NHIS survey in July 2020 as one of the emerging public health topics affecting the United States related to the COVID-19 pandemic, which was declared in March 2020 by the World Health Organization.

Trend data on telemedicine use in children is limited.  Since April 2020, the experimental data system called the Household Pulse Survey, which is a collaboration between multiple federal agencies, began collecting data on telemedicine use in the past 4 weeks in households with at least one child under 18 years of age, among other social and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. 


Q: What is the main takeaway message here?

MV: Approximately 12.6 million children in the U.S.—corresponding to 17.5% of children aged 0–17 years—used telemedicine in the past 12 months from the time of interview in July-December 2020 (a period that included time before and during the coronavirus pandemic).  

Telemedicine use in the past 12 months varied by age of the child, family income, and region of the country.

Approximately 10.2 million U.S. children—corresponding to 14.1% of children aged 0–17 years—used telemedicine in 2020 because of the pandemic.

Telemedicine use because of the pandemic varied by education of the parents living with the child and region of the country and urbanization level of residence.

Telemedicine use in the past 12 months and because of the pandemic was higher for children with current asthma, a developmental condition, and disability.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥18 Years Who Met the Federal Guidelines for Muscle-Strengthening Physical Activity, by Age Group and Sex — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2020

May 6, 2022

In 2020, 35.2% of men and 26.9% of women aged ≥18 years met the federal guideline for muscle-strengthening physical activity.

The percentage of men who met the muscle-strengthening guideline decreased with age from 44.5% for those aged 18–44 years, to 29.9% for those aged 45–64 years, and to 22.0% for those aged ≥65 years.

The percentage also decreased with age among women from 34.1% for those aged 18–44 years, to 23.8% for those aged 45–64 years, and to 17.2% for those aged ≥65 years.

Men were more likely to have met the muscle-strengthening guideline than women in all age groups.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7118a6.htm