QuickStats: Rate of Alcohol-Induced Deaths Among Persons Aged 25 Years or Older, by Age Group

August 26, 2019

Rates of alcohol-induced deaths for persons aged 45–64 years increased from 17.3 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 26.0 in 2017.

For persons aged 25–44 years, rates declined from 1999 to 2005, were stable from 2005 to 2012, and then increased from 2012 (4.8) to 2017 (6.3).

A similar pattern was observed for persons aged ≥65 years, with an initial decline, a stable period, and then an increase from 2011 (12.0) to 2017 (16.4).

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6833a5.htm


2017 Final Deaths, Leading Causes of Death and Life Tables Reports Released

June 24, 2019

NCHS released a report that presents the final 2017 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Key Findings:

  • In 2017, a total of 2,813,503 deaths were reported in the United States.
  • The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, an increase of 0.4% from the 2016 rate.
  • Life expectancy at birth was 78.6 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from the 2016 rate.
  • Life expectancy decreased from 2016 to 2017 for non-Hispanic white males (0.1 year) and non-Hispanic black males (0.1), and increased for non-Hispanic black females (0.1).
  • Age-specific death rates increased in 2017 from 2016 for age groups 25–34, 35–44, and 85 and over, and decreased for age groups under 1 and 45–54.
  • The 15 leading causes of death in 2017 remained the same as in 2016 although, two causes exchanged ranks.
  • Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, the 12th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 11th leading cause of death in 2017, while Septicemia, the 11th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 12th leading cause of death in 2017.
  • The infant mortality rate, 5.79 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2017, did not change significantly from the rate of 5.87 in 2016.

NCHS also released the 2017 U.S. Life Tables and Leading Causes of Death Reports.


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentages of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Are Current Regular Drinkers of Alcohol, by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin — National Health Interview Survey, 2016

March 19, 2018

In 2016, men aged 18 years or older were more likely than women to be current regular drinkers of alcohol (62.1% versus 47.2%).

Non-Hispanic white men (65.5%) were more likely to be current regular drinkers than Hispanic men (57.8%) and non-Hispanic black men (52.9%).

Non-Hispanic white women (55.6%) were more likely to be current regular drinkers than non-Hispanic black women (35.9%) and Hispanic women (31.5%).

Source: Tables of summary health statistics for US adults, National Health Interview Survey, 2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6710a8.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates Attributable to Alcohol-Induced Causes, by Race/Ethnicity — United States, 1999–2015

May 15, 2017

In 2015, mortality from alcohol-induced causes reached the highest rate during 1999–2015 of 9.1 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population.

Alcohol-induced death rates for the Hispanic population remained the highest (9.9 per 100,000 U.S. standard population), followed by the non-Hispanic white population (9.6).

For the non-Hispanic black population, the alcohol-induced death rate decreased 33% from 1999 to 2015, while the rate increased by 50% during the same period for the non-Hispanic white population.

Overall, from 1999 to 2015, mortality from alcohol-induced causes increased 28% (7.1 to 9.1).

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6618a12.htm


Stat of the Day – May 12, 2017

May 12, 2017


Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January–September 2016 National Health Interview Survey

February 23, 2017
Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician

Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician

Questions for Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician and Lead Author on the “Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January–September 2016 National Health Interview Survey.”

Q: What health measures does this report look at?

TC: The measures covered in this report are lack of health insurance coverage and type of coverage, having a usual place to go for medical care, obtaining needed medical care, receipt of influenza vaccination, receipt of pneumococcal vaccination, obesity, leisure–time physical activity, current cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, general health status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma. Three of these measures (lack of health insurance coverage, leisure-time physical activity, and current cigarette smoking) are directly related to Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators.


Q: How do you collect your data for these surveys?

TC: The data is collected by household interview surveys that are fielded continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Interviews are conducted in respondents’ homes. Health and socio-demographic information is collected on each member of all families residing within a sampled household. Within each family, additional information is collected from one randomly selected adult (the “sample adult”) aged 18 years or older and one randomly selected child (the “sample child”) aged 17 years or younger. NHIS data is collected at one point in time so we cannot determine causation. Data presented in this report are quarterly data and are preliminary.


Q: What are some of the findings that you would highlight in this early release report?

TC: Here are some findings from the early release report:

• The percentage of persons of all ages who had a usual place to go for medical care decreased, from 87.9% in 2003 to 85.4% in 2010, and then increased to 88.3% in January–September 2016.

• The percentage of persons who failed to obtain needed medical care due to cost increased, from 4.3% in 1999 to 6.9% in 2009 and 2010, and then decreased to 4.4% in January–September 2016.

• The percentage of adults aged 65 and over who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination increased from 63.5% in 2015 to 67.3% in January–September 2016.

• The prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults aged 20 and over increased, from 19.4% in 1997 to 30.6% in January–September 2016.

• In the third quarter of 2016, 52.8% of U.S. adults aged 18 and over met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity (based on leisure-time activity). This was higher than the third quarter of 2015 estimate of 49.5%.

• The prevalence of current cigarette smoking among U.S. adults declined, from 24.7% in 1997 to 15.3% in 2015 and remained low through the third quarter of 2016 (15.9%).
• During January–September 2016, men were more likely to have had at least 1 heavy alcohol drinking day (31.6%) in the past year compared with women (18.6%).

• The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 18 and over increased, from 5.1% in 1997 to 9.2% in 2010, and has since remained stable through January–September 2016.


Q: What do the findings in this report tell us about the health of the country overall?

TC: Since 2010, the percentage of uninsured persons has decreased by almost 50% (16.0% vs 8.8%) and the percentage of persons who failed to obtain needed medical care due to cost has also shown a significant decline during the same time period (6.9% to 4.4%). These two indicators demonstrate increased access to healthcare from 2010 to September 2016.


Q: Are there any trends in this report that Americans should be concerned about?

TC: Although in the 3rd quarter of 2016, 52.8% of U.S. adults met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity; obesity is an epidemic that has seen a steady increase since 1997 and now affects just under one third (30.6%) of U.S. adults.


Alcohol Awareness Month

April 8, 2015

April is Alcohol Awareness Month.  This month highlights the health risks associated with problem drinking and the importance of identification and intervention.  According to NCHS data, there are over 18,000 alcoholic liver disease deaths and 29,000 alcohol-induced deaths (excluding accidents and homicides) in the U.S.

Over 50 percent of the adults in the U.S. have said that they have had at least 12 alcoholic drinks in the past year.

The U.S. adult population consumes an average of almost 100 calories per day from alcoholic beverages.  Men consume more calories from alcoholic beverages than women. Younger adults consume more calories from alcoholic beverages than older adults. Men consume more beer than other types of alcohol.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/alcohol.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/