A brief look at emergency room visits

November 19, 2008

In 2006, about 4 out of every 10 people visited an emergency room.

Of those visits–

About 22% were seen in less than 15 minutes.
About 13% needed hospital admission.
Only about 2% needed to transer to higher level or specialized care.

The most common diagnosis in emergency departments–injury and poisoning.

For more NCHS Fast Stats, please click here.


Food allergies on the rise among U.S. children

October 22, 2008

 

More Highlights from Data Brief #10:

  • In 2007, approximately 3 million children under age 18 years (3.9%) were reported to have a food or digestive allergy in the previous 12 months.
  • From 1997 to 2007, the prevalence of reported food allergy increased 18% among children under age 18 years.
  • Children with food allergy are two to four times more likely to have other related conditions such as asthma and other allergies, compared with children without food allergies.
  • From 2004 to 2006, there were approximately 9,500 hospital discharges per year with a diagnosis related to food allergy among children under age 18 years.
  • Link to full report.


    Ambulatory Care Visits

    July 19, 2007

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today issued a new report, “Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2005,” which contains information on patient visits to emergency departments, outpatient clinics, and physician offices.

    Highlights of the report:

    • There were over 1.2 billion patient visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient clinics, and emergency rooms in 2005.  Over the past decade, rates of visits per population increased for all types of health care settings studied. 
    • In the emergency department, the visit rate for patients with no insurance was about twice that of those with private insurance.
    • Conversely, patient visits to physician offices were higher for individuals with private health insurance compared with uninsured persons.
    • Over 29 percent of all ambulatory care visits were for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes, and one in four were for preventive care, including check-ups, prenatal care, and post-surgical care.
    • There were 2.4 billion medications prescribed or administered at these visits.

    Available for download.


    New Emergency Department Report

    June 29, 2007

    Released today. Some of the highlights

    During 2005, an estimated 115.3 million visits were made to hospital EDs, about 39.6 visits per 100 persons. This represents on average roughly 30,000 visits per ED in 2005, a 31 percent increase over 1995 (23,000). Visit rates have shown an increasing trend since 1995 for persons 22–49 years of age, 50–64 years of age, and 65 years of age and over. In 2005, about 0.5 million (0.4 percent) of visits were made by homeless individuals. Nearly 18 million patients arrived by ambulance (15.5 percent). At 1.9 percent of visits, the patient had been discharged from the hospital within the previous 7 days. Abdominal pain, chest pain, fever, and cough were the leading patient complaints, accounting for nearly one-fifth of all visits. Abdominal pain was the leading illness-related diagnosis at ED visits. There were an estimated 41.9 million injury-related visits or 14.4 visits per 100 persons.


    New Ambulatory Care Report

    June 29, 2007

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today issued a new report, “Ambulatory Medical Care Utilization Estimates for 2005,” which contains information on patient visits to emergency departments, outpatient clinics, and physician offices.

    Highlights of the report:

    There were over 1.2 billion patient visits to physician offices, hospital outpatient clinics, and emergency rooms in 2005. Over the past decade, rates of visits per population increased for all types of health care settings studied.

    In the emergency department, the visit rate for patients with no insurance was about twice that of those with private insurance.

    Conversely, patient visits to physician offices were higher for individuals with private health insurance compared with uninsured persons.

    Over 29 percent of all ambulatory care visits were for chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes, and one in four were for preventive care, including check-ups, prenatal care, and post-surgical care.

    There were 2.4 billion medications prescribed or administered at these visits.