QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Teens Aged 5–17 Years Who Missed >10 School Days in the Past 12 Months Because of Illness or Injury, by Sex and Age — National Health Interview Survey, 2013–2015

July 7, 2017

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During 2013–2015, 3.9% of boys and 4.3% of girls missed >10 school days in the past 12 months because of illness or injury.

Among children aged 15–17 years, girls were more likely than boys to miss >10 school days (6.8% compared with 3.9%).

Among girls, those aged 15–17 years were more likely than girls aged 5–10 years and girls aged 11–14 years to miss >10 school days (6.8% compared with 3.2% and 4.0%, respectively).

Among boys, there was no difference by age.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6626a8.htm

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Federal report on America’s children released

July 10, 2009

Federal interagency report shows declines in preterm birth and low birthweight. Children more likely to live in poverty, less likely to have parent employed full time.

These and other statistics have been compiled in America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2009. It is compiled by a number of federal agencies and provides a comprehensive picture of the following key areas of child well-being: family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.

To access the report, please visit www.childstats.gov


America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being

July 19, 2007

Last Friday we released the 10th anniversary edition of America’s Children, a product of the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (Forum) is a collection of 22 Federal government agencies involved in research and activities related to children and families. The Forum was founded in 1994 and formally established in April 1997 under Executive Order No. 13045. The mission of the Forum is to foster coordination and collaboration and to enhance and improve consistency in the collection and reporting of Federal data on children and families. The Forum also aims to improve the reporting and dissemination of information on the status of children and families.

Quite a bit of media interest was generated (here | here) on the subject of teen sexual behavior but there was much more to the report. The full report is available here and our overview of the data on health indicators which we contributed to is below the fold.

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