Smoking Prevalence and Cessation Before and During Pregnancy

February 10, 2016

Smoking_Pregnancy

A new NCHS report presents findings on maternal smoking prevalence and cessation before and during pregnancy as collected on the 2003 U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth, for a 46-state and District of Columbia reporting area, representing 95% of all births in the United States.

Findings:

  • About 1 in 10 women who gave birth in 2014 smoked during the 3 months before pregnancy (10.9%), and about one-quarter of these women (24.2%) did not smoke during pregnancy (i.e., quit before pregnancy).
  • The smoking rate at any time during pregnancy was 8.4%, with 20.6% of women who smoked in the first or second trimesters quitting by the third trimester.
  • Smoking during pregnancy was more prevalent for women aged 20–24 (13.0%) than for other ages, and by race and Hispanic origin, the highest rate was for non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native women (18%).

Discussions Between Health Care Providers and Their Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes

December 8, 2014

Smoking is the primary cause of preventable death in the United States. Studies show that a majority of smokers would like to quit and that even simple advice from physicians has a positive effect on cessation rates. Federal and nonprofit agencies have recommended screening and identification of smokers by clinicians and health care delivery systems, as well as intervention and guidance on quitting. Studies suggest that older persons, women, heavier smokers, and those in poorer health are more likely to receive medical advice to quit smoking.

A new NCHS report extends earlier research by identifying key population and health characteristics associated with those U.S. cigarette smokers aged 18 and over who had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • About one-half of adult cigarette smokers had a doctor or other health professional talk to them about their smoking in the past 12 months.
  • Men, younger adults, Hispanic adults, and non-Hispanic Asian adults were less likely than other cigarette smokers to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.
  • Healthier smokers, younger smokers, and those who did not smoke cigarettes every day were less likely than other cigarette smokers to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.
  • Cigarette smokers with selected health conditions linked to smoking were more likely than those without these conditions to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.