QuickStats: Rate of Unintentional Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)–Related Deaths Among Persons Aged 24 Years and Under, by Age Group

October 16, 2020

From 1999 to 2018, death rates for unintentional TBI among persons aged 24 years and under declined across all age groups.

During the 20-year period, TBI-related death rates declined from 3.7 per 100,000 to 1.5 among children aged 0–4 years, from 3.0 to 0.9 for children and adolescents aged 5–14 years, from 14.7 to 4.4 for adolescents and young adults aged 15–19 years, and from 14.1 to 6.9 for young adults aged 20–24 years.

For most of the period, rates were highest for persons aged 20–24 years followed by those aged 15–19, 0–4, and 5–14 years.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6941a5.htm


QuickStats: Death Rates from Influenza and Pneumonia Among Persons Aged 65 Years or Older

October 9, 2020

In 2018, the death rate from influenza and pneumonia among persons aged 65 years or older was 93.2 deaths per 100,000 population.

Death rates increased with age from 31.7 deaths per 100,000 population among adults aged 65–74 years, to 94.2 among adults aged 75–84 years, to 377.6 among those aged 85 years or older.

Rates increased with age for both men and women, and in each age group the death rates were higher for men than for women.

Source: National Vital Statistics System mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6940a5.htm


Motor Vehicle Traffic Death Rates Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–24, by Urbanicity: United States, 2000–2018

October 8, 2020

Questions for Sally Curtin, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Motor Vehicle Traffic Death Rates Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–24, by Urbanicity: United States, 2000–2018.”


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

SC: The finding that the difference in MVT death rates between persons aged 15-24 and 25 years and over has narrowed so much since 2000 so that the rate is only 7% higher for 15-24 year-olds in 2018.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

SC: These data are from the National Vital Statistics System and come from the information from death certificates in the United States.  All of the rates in this report are reproducible from the CDC WONDER online database.


Q: How do you classify urban and rural areas?

SC: The National Center for Health Statistics developed a scheme (the latest published in 2013) to classify the urbanicity of counties by combining information on whether the county was considered to be part of a metropolitan area and the population of the county.  Based on this, there are four categories of Metropolitan (urban) counties, from largest to smallest, and two categories of rural counties.


Q: Is this the first report on motor vehicle deaths with an urban and rural breakdown?  Is there any trend data that goes back further than 2000?

SC: A recent NCHS report examined trends in MVT deaths by urban-rural classification but it was for all ages combined.  This is the first report to focus on trends in younger adults, aged 15-24, by urban-rural.

There is MVT trends data prior to 2000, although they are not entirely comparable to the data from 1999 to the present.  However, trends from 1980-1999 rates are generally downward.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

SC: There has been great progress in reducing death rates to young adults aged 15-24, for whom this has been a leading cause of death.  However, the disparity in rates that still exist between rural and urban counties shows that there is more work to be done, particularly in the most rural areas.

 


Fact or Fiction: Are there more deaths from cocaine overdoses in the U.S. than from heroin overdoses?

October 7, 2020

Source: National Vital Statistics System

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db384.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Lung Cancer Death Rates by State — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2018

September 11, 2020

In 2018, the age-adjusted lung cancer death rate in the United States was 34.8 per 100,000.

Twenty-one states had a higher lung cancer death rate than the national rate, 15 states and DC had lower death rates, and 14 states had rates that were not statistically different from the national rate.

Most states with higher death rates were in the Midwest or Southeast. The five states with the highest age-adjusted lung cancer death rates were Kentucky (53.5), West Virginia (50.8), Mississippi (49.6), Arkansas (47.4), and Oklahoma (46.8).

The five jurisdictions with the lowest lung cancer death rates were Utah (16.4), New Mexico (22.5), Colorado (23.0), DC (24.6), and California (25.0).

Sources: National Center for Health Statistics. National Vital Statistics System, mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm; CDC. CDC WONDER online database. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6936a8.htm


QuickStats: Rates of Deaths Attributed to Unintentional Injury from Fire or Flames by Age Group and Urbanization Level

August 28, 2020

In 2018, the death rates attributed to unintentional injury from fire or flames were lowest among those aged 15–24 years and highest among those aged 75 years or older.

In rural areas, death rates decreased with age from 2.0 per 100,000 for persons aged 0–4 years to 0.3 for those aged 15–24 years, and then increased with age to 5.6 for those aged 75 years or older.

The pattern was similar for urban areas, where rates were 0.5 per 100,000 for persons aged 0–4 years, decreased to 0.1 for those aged 15–24 years, and then increased with age to 2.8 for those aged 75 years or older.

Across all age groups, death rates were approximately two to four times higher in rural areas compared with urban areas.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, mortality data; 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6934a8.htm 


QuickStats: Death Rates from Stroke Among Persons Aged ≥65 Years, by Sex and Age Group

August 21, 2020

In 2018, the death rate from stroke was 242.7 per 100,000 persons aged 65 years or older.

Persons aged 85 years or older had the highest death rate from stroke (984.3), followed by those aged 75–84 years (256.0) and those aged 65–74 years (76.8).

For both men and women, the death rates increased with age.  The death rate for women (261.6) was higher than that for men (219.0) for persons aged 65 years or older, but men had higher stroke death rates for the 65–74 and 75–84 age groups.

Women aged 85 years or older had higher death rates than did men in this age group.

Source: National Vital Statistics System mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6933a5.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Males, Females and Both Sexes — United States, 2009–2018

August 7, 2020

During 2009–2018, the age-adjusted death rate in the United States generally declined, from 749.6 per 100,000 in 2009 to 723.6 in 2018.

The death rate among males declined from 2009 (890.9) to 2014 (855.1), increased in 2015 (863.2), and then remained relatively flat until 2018 (855.5).

Among females, the death rate declined steadily from 2009 (636.8) to 2018 (611.3). Throughout this period the death rate for males was higher than that for females.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6931a5.htm


QuickStats: Number of Natural Heat-Related Deaths by Sex and Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2018

July 31, 2020

In 2018, natural heat exposure was associated with 726 deaths among males and 282 deaths among females.

Among males, the highest number of heat-related deaths was for those aged 55–64 years (150) and among females for those aged 65–74 years (58).

The lowest numbers were for males (four) and females (two) aged 5–14 years. Approximately 72% of heat-related deaths were among males.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Multiple cause of death data, 1999–2018. https://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6930a6.htm


Infant Mortality in the United States, 2018: Data From the Period Linked Birth/Infant Death File

July 16, 2020

Questions for Danielle Ely, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Infant Mortality in the United States, 2018: Data From the Period Linked Birth/Infant Death File.”

Q: Why does NCHS conduct studies on infant mortality?

DE: NCHS collects data from U.S. jurisdictions on infant deaths to provide national statistics on infant mortality. Infant mortality is considered a key public health indicator for a country.


Q: Can you explain what the Linked Birth/Infant Death File is?

DE: The linked file consists of infant death information linked with the birth certificate information for infants under 1 year of age. Individual birth and death records are selected from their respective files and linked into a single statistical record, thereby establishing a national linked record file. The linked birth/infant death data set is the preferred source for examining infant mortality by race and Hispanic origin. Infant mortality rates by race and Hispanic origin are more accurately measured from the birth certificate compared with the death certificate.


Q: Can you summarize how the infant mortality data varied?

DE: The U.S. infant mortality rate was 5.67 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, lower than the rate of 5.79 in 2017 and an historic low. The mortality rate declined in 2018 for infants of Hispanic women compared with the 2017 rate; changes in rates for other race and Hispanic-origin groups were not statistically significant. The 2018 infant mortality rate for infants of non-Hispanic black women (10.75) was more than twice as high as that for infants of non-Hispanic white (4.63), non-Hispanic Asian (3.63), and Hispanic women (4.86). Infants born very preterm (less than 28 weeks of gestation) had the highest mortality rate (382.20), 186 times as high as that for infants born at term (37–41 weeks of gestation) (2.05). Infant mortality rates by state for 2018 ranged from a low of 3.50 in New Hampshire to a high of 8.41 in Mississippi.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

DE: Although the infant mortality rate continues to slowly decline, some groups have consistently higher rates than others (for example, by maternal race and Hispanic origin, infants of non-Hispanic black, American Indian or Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander women have higher rates than infants of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic women). This information can further our understanding of current infant mortality trends and provide information on where improvements can be made.


Q: Any predictions for 2019 infant mortality data?

DE: We do not predict what will happen for the infant mortality rate in future years. Provisional estimates for each quarter can be found in the Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/infant-mortality-dashboard.htm. These data show a slight increase in the 2019 quarter 2 estimates to 5.69 infant deaths per 1,000 live births.  Note that this estimate may be revised when the 2018 quarter 3 estimate becomes available.