Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-June 2018 National Health Interview Survey

December 6, 2018

Questions for Lead Author Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician, of “Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-June 2018 National Health Interview Survey.”

Q: What are some of the findings that you would highlight in this early release report?

TC:  Diabetes and obesity continue to increase among U.S. adults.  The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 18 and over increased from 7.8% in 2006 to 10.2% in January–June 2018.  During the same period the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults aged 20 and over increased from 26.4%  to 31.7%.


Q: What do the findings in this report tell us about the health of the country overall?

TC:  The health of our nation is multifaceted and quite complex. While we make improvements in some areas, such as increased leisure time physical activity and declining smoking rates, other areas leave a lot to be desired. The prevalence of diabetes and obesity continue to rise.


Q: Are there any trends in this report that Americans should be concerned about?

TC: Yes, the observed increase in the prevalence of diabetes and obesity, suggests that Americans need to work towards achieving a healthy balance between dietary intake and exercise.


Q: Why did you decide to only look back to 2006?  Previous NHIS Early Release reports went back to 1997?

TC: The Early Release Key Health Indicators report transitioned from static quarterly reports to a dynamic report back in June 2018. In the previous format, we included estimates back to 1997, but the trend results were getting unwieldy to produce and interpret on a quarterly basis.  Thus, we made the decision to start the trends at 2006 for the newer format.  Readers can still go back and view the static reports and combined with the dynamic report, they can construct the longer trend.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

TC: Americans are making significant improvement is some aspects of health, but are falling short in others.

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Fact or Fiction: Is Undiagnosed diabetes more prevalent among American adults than diabetes that has already been diagnosed by a physician?

September 19, 2018

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013-2016

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db319.pdf


Prevalence of Total, Diagnosed, and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among Adults: United States, 2013-2016

September 19, 2018

Questions for Mark Eberhardt, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Prevalence of Total, Diagnosed, and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among Adults: United States, 2013-2016

Q: Why did you decide to focus on diabetes in the United States for this report?

ME: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is the only nationally representative survey that can estimate undiagnosed diabetes, since more recent data are available to consider this subject, it was appropriate to present it.


Q: Can you explain the differences between diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes?

ME: People with diagnosed diabetes are those who report a medical history of diabetes (that is, a health care provider previously told them that they have diabetes). People with undiagnosed diabetes are those who do not report a previous medical history of diabetes, but who have laboratory results from blood specimens obtaining in NHANES which are in the diabetic range, as defined by the American Diabetes Association.


Q: How did the findings vary by sex, age, race and weight?

ME: The percent of adults with diabetes increases with age; a higher percent of men, compared to women, have total diabetes (which includes diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes); a higher percent of non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults have diabetes and total diabetes compared to non-Hispanic white adults. The percent of adults with diabetes (diagnosed, undiagnosed, or total diabetes) is higher among those who are overweight or obese.


Q: How did you obtain this data?

ME: The data were obtained in 2013-2016 by NHANES. This is a population-based community health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). NHANES has staff and mobile examination centers that travel around the US and obtain health-related interview, examination and laboratory information from a nationally representative sample of people in the US.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

ME: Diabetes remains a serious common health condition among adults in the US, and a substantial percent of adults with diabetes still report not having it.


QuickStats: Percentage of Visits to Office-Based Physicians by Adults Aged 18 Years or Older for Diabetes Mellitus, by Sex and Age — National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015

November 27, 2017

In 2015, diabetes was a reason for 4.2% of visits by adults to office-based physicians.

Men aged 18–44 years had a higher percentage of visits for diabetes compared with women aged 18–44 years (2.2% versus 0.4%, respectively).

Both women and men aged 18–44 years had a lower percentage of visits for diabetes compared with adults aged 45–64 and over 65 years.

Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015 data

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6646a7.htm 

 


Stat of the Day – November 14, 2017

November 14, 2017


Stat of the Day – November 2, 2017

November 2, 2017


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 65 Years or Older Who Saw Selected Types of Health Professionals in the Past 12 Months, by Diagnosed Diabetes Status

May 22, 2017

In 2015, adults aged 65 years or older with diagnosed diabetes were more likely than adults without diagnosed diabetes to report seeing general doctors (92.3% compared with 86.7%); eye doctors (66.9% compared with 56.6%); physician specialists (51.5% compared with 45.5%); foot doctors (29.9% compared with 13.0%) and mental health professionals (6.3% compared with 4.5%) in the past 12 months.

Those with diabetes were less likely than those without diabetes to report seeing a dentist or dental hygienist in the past 12 months (54.5% compared with 65%).

Sourcehttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6619a10.htm