Prevalence of Total, Diagnosed, and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among Adults: United States, 2013-2016

September 19, 2018

Questions for Mark Eberhardt, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Prevalence of Total, Diagnosed, and Undiagnosed Diabetes Among Adults: United States, 2013-2016

Q: Why did you decide to focus on diabetes in the United States for this report?

ME: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is the only nationally representative survey that can estimate undiagnosed diabetes, since more recent data are available to consider this subject, it was appropriate to present it.


Q: Can you explain the differences between diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes?

ME: People with diagnosed diabetes are those who report a medical history of diabetes (that is, a health care provider previously told them that they have diabetes). People with undiagnosed diabetes are those who do not report a previous medical history of diabetes, but who have laboratory results from blood specimens obtaining in NHANES which are in the diabetic range, as defined by the American Diabetes Association.


Q: How did the findings vary by sex, age, race and weight?

ME: The percent of adults with diabetes increases with age; a higher percent of men, compared to women, have total diabetes (which includes diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes); a higher percent of non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults have diabetes and total diabetes compared to non-Hispanic white adults. The percent of adults with diabetes (diagnosed, undiagnosed, or total diabetes) is higher among those who are overweight or obese.


Q: How did you obtain this data?

ME: The data were obtained in 2013-2016 by NHANES. This is a population-based community health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). NHANES has staff and mobile examination centers that travel around the US and obtain health-related interview, examination and laboratory information from a nationally representative sample of people in the US.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

ME: Diabetes remains a serious common health condition among adults in the US, and a substantial percent of adults with diabetes still report not having it.


QuickStats: Percentage of Visits to Office-Based Physicians by Adults Aged 18 Years or Older for Diabetes Mellitus, by Sex and Age — National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015

November 27, 2017

In 2015, diabetes was a reason for 4.2% of visits by adults to office-based physicians.

Men aged 18–44 years had a higher percentage of visits for diabetes compared with women aged 18–44 years (2.2% versus 0.4%, respectively).

Both women and men aged 18–44 years had a lower percentage of visits for diabetes compared with adults aged 45–64 and over 65 years.

Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015 data

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6646a7.htm 

 


Stat of the Day – November 14, 2017

November 14, 2017


Stat of the Day – November 2, 2017

November 2, 2017


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 65 Years or Older Who Saw Selected Types of Health Professionals in the Past 12 Months, by Diagnosed Diabetes Status

May 22, 2017

In 2015, adults aged 65 years or older with diagnosed diabetes were more likely than adults without diagnosed diabetes to report seeing general doctors (92.3% compared with 86.7%); eye doctors (66.9% compared with 56.6%); physician specialists (51.5% compared with 45.5%); foot doctors (29.9% compared with 13.0%) and mental health professionals (6.3% compared with 4.5%) in the past 12 months.

Those with diabetes were less likely than those without diabetes to report seeing a dentist or dental hygienist in the past 12 months (54.5% compared with 65%).

Sourcehttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6619a10.htm


QuickStats: Number of Deaths from 10 Leading Causes by Sex — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2015

April 24, 2017

In 2015, a total of 1,339,226 deaths among females and 1,373,404 deaths among males occurred.

Heart disease and cancer were the top two causes of death for both females and males; other leading causes varied in rank by sex.

The 10 leading causes of death accounted for approximately three-quarters of all deaths.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6615a8.htm


State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm