Emergency Department Visits by Patients aged 45 and over with Diabetes: United States, 2015

February 8, 2018

Questions for Pinyao Rui, Statistician and Author of, “Emergency Department Visits by Patients aged 45 and over with Diabetes: United States, 2015.”

Q: Why did you decide to examine emergency department (ED) visits made by patients aged 45 years older with diabetes?

PR: We decided to examine emergency department visits made by patients aged 45 years and older because we wanted to focus on visits made by older patients who are at higher risk of developing or having diabetes and who comprise a majority of all diabetes cases in the U.S.  Additionally, we wanted to use more recent data not currently available in the literature to examine characteristics of an ED visit for a condition that is projected to rise and contribute to increasing burden of medical care systems.


Q: How did the rate of emergency department visits by patients aged 45 and over with diabetes change with age?

PR: The rate of emergency department visits by patients aged 45 and over increased with age. The rate increased from 69 per 1,000 persons for those aged 45-64 years and more than doubled to 164 per 1,000 persons for those aged 75 years and over.


Q: Were there differences in the percentage of visits that ended in inpatient hospital admission by diabetes status?

PR: Yes, the percentage of ED visits with diabetes that ended in inpatient hospital admission was significantly higher than the percentage of ED visits without diabetes among visits made by patients aged 45-64 and 65 and over.


Q: Are there any findings that surprised you from this report?

PR: One finding from the report that surprised me was that among ED visits made by 45-64 year olds, a higher proportion of diabetes visits were paid by Medicare compared with visits made by patients without diabetes (24% versus 14%).


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

PR: I think the take home message is that the percentage of ED visits by older patients with diabetes reported in the medical record has been increasing in recent years with the highest proportion observed in patients aged 65-74 (32% in 2015).

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QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits for Acute Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection That Had an Antimicrobial Ordered or Prescribed, by Metropolitan Statistical Area — United States, 2008–2015

January 29, 2018

From 2008–2011 to 2012–2015, the percentage of visits for acute viral upper respiratory tract infection that had an antimicrobial ordered or prescribed decreased from 37.1% to 25.5% among emergency departments (EDs) located in nonmetropolitan statistical areas, but this decline was not seen among EDs in metropolitan statistical areas.

In 2008–2011, the percentage was higher among nonmetropolitan EDs than metropolitan EDs, but there was no difference in 2012–2015.

Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2008–2015
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6703a7.htm


Fact or Fiction: Is the Average Wait Time to See a Medical Professional in the Emergency Room Less Than an Hour?

November 9, 2017

Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhamcs/web_tables/2014_ed_web_tables.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/videos/2017/november2017/FOFNovember2017.htm


Sports and Recreation Related Injury Episodes in the United States, 2011-2014

November 18, 2016
Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow

Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow

Questions for Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow and Lead Author on “Sports and Recreation Related Injury Episodes in the United States, 2011-2014

Q: How many sports and recreation related injuries are being reported annually?

YS: According to our analysis, approximately 8.6 million of sports- and recreation- related injury episodes were reported annually among persons aged 5 and over using data from the 2011-2014 National Health Interview Survey. These injury episodes were medically-attended, for which a health care professional was contacted, either in person or by telephone, for advice or treatment. Therefore, these injury episodes were not limited to those resulted in emergency department visit or hospitalization.


Q: Did the sports and recreation related injuries differ by sex and age group? If so how?

YS: Yes. The distribution of sports- and recreation-related injuries differed by both sex and age. Approximately 60% of all the sports- and recreation-related injuries were sustained by men. Children and young adults between age 5 and 24 years old also accounted for 65% of the total sport- and recreation-related injuries.


Q: What types of sports and recreation activities are causing these injuries?

YS: Our data shows that general exercise, which includes aerobics, exercising, weight training, running, jogging, and school related activity, was the most frequently mentioned activity associated with sports-and recreation-related injuries. However, it does not mean that general exercise is more likely to “cause” injuries. We are unable to study what activities are more likely to cause injuries because the National Health Interview Survey do not collect data on activity participation. This prevents us from evaluating the risk of injury for individual activity.


Q: What parts of the body were more frequently injured while engaging in sports and recreation?

YS: Lower (42%) and upper (30%) extremities were the most frequently mentioned parts of body injured while engaging in the sports and recreation activity.


Q: Why did you decide to look at sports and recreation related injuries?

YS: Many epidemiological studies of sports- and recreation-related injuries have focused on specific populations, sport activities, or outcomes. Limited number of studies have provided national estimates on overall sports- and recreation-related injuries among all population. The latest national estimates on these type of injuries (that are not limited to emergency department visits data) were derived from 1997-1999 data. As more people engage in sports and recreation activity, we feel there is a need to address the patterns of sports- and recreation- related injuries using more recent data.


Emergency Department Visits Related to Schizophrenia Among Adults Aged 18–64: United States, 2009–2011

September 23, 2015

Schizophrenia is a severe brain disorder with clinical manifestations that may include hallucinations, delusions, and thought and movement disorders.

A new NCHS report describes the rate and characteristics of emergency department (ED) visits related to schizophrenia among adults aged 18–64.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • During 2009–2011, an estimated 382,000 ED visits related to schizophrenia occurred each year among adults aged 18–64, with an overall ED visit rate of 20.1 per 10,000 adults.
  • The overall rate for ED visits related to schizophrenia for men (26.5 per 10,000) was approximately double the rate for women (13.8 per 10,000).
  • Public insurance (Medicaid, Medicare, or dual Medicare and Medicaid) was used more frequently at ED visits related to schizophrenia compared with ED visits not related to schizophrenia.
  • About one-half of ED visits related to schizophrenia led to either a hospital admission (32.7%) or a transfer to a psychiatric hospital (16.7%); these percentages were higher than for ED visits not related to schizophrenia.

 


Emergency Department Visits for Drug Poisoning: United States, 2008–2011

April 9, 2015

Poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the United States, with more than 40,000 deaths annually. Drugs account for 90% of poisoning deaths, and the number of deaths from drug poisoning has increased substantially in recent years. The emergency department (ED) plays an important role in the treatment of poisoning.

A new NCHS report describes nationally representative data on ED visits for drug poisoning during 2008–2011.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • During 2008–2011, an average of 1.1 million emergency department (ED) visits were made each year for drug poisoning, with a visit rate of 35.4 per 10,000 persons.
  • The ED visit rate for drug poisoning was highest among persons aged 20–34. The rate declined with age after 20–34, and rates for those aged 0–19 were similar to those aged 50 and over.
  • Drug-poisoning ED visit rates did not differ by sex and age, with the exception of persons aged 35–49, where females had a higher visit rate than males. The ED visit rate for unintentional drug poisoning was higher than self-inflicted drug poisoning overall and for males, but did not differ for females.
  • About one-quarter (24.5%) of drug-poisoning ED visits resulted in hospital admission.

Emergency Department Visits and Proximity to Patients’ Residences, 2009–2010

March 19, 2015

The number of emergency department (ED) visits rose 44% from 1991 through 2010, even as the number of hospital EDs declined 10% over the same period.

As a result, EDs have increasingly experienced overcrowding and longer waiting times. Using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a new NCHS report provides how often patients go to the ED closest to their home, and how differences in geography, patient demographics, and hospital characteristics are associated with ED selection patterns.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2009–2010, visits to emergency departments (EDs) occurred an average 6.8 miles from the patient’s residence, while the nearest ED was 3.9 miles from the home.
  • Less than one-half of all ED visits (43.8%) occurred at the ED closest to where the patient lived.
  • Visits within metropolitan statistical areas were less likely (37.2%) to take place at the closest ED compared with visits outside of metropolitan statistical areas (70.1%).
  • Within metropolitan statistical areas, visits that did not take place at the closest ED occurred more frequently among younger patients, at larger hospitals, and in EDs with longer waiting times, compared with visits to the closest ED.