QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits for Acute Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infection at Which an Antimicrobial Was Given or Prescribed by Age — United States, 2010–2017

February 14, 2020

From 2010–2013 to 2014–2017, the percentage of emergency department (ED) visits for acute viral upper respiratory tract infection that had an antimicrobial given or prescribed, hereafter referred to as ED visits, decreased from 23.4% to 17.6%.

A decline was also seen for ED visits by children, decreasing from 17.9% to 10.1%, but a decline was not seen for ED visits by adults. In both periods, the percentage of ED visits by adults was higher than the percentage of ED visits by children.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2010–2017. ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Datasets/NHAMCS.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6906a6.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits for Pain at Which Opioids Were Given or Prescribed, by Geographic Region of the Hospital — United States, 2005–2017

January 17, 2020

The percentage of emergency department visits for pain at which an opioid was given or prescribed increased from 37.4% in 2005 to 43.1% in 2010 and then decreased to 30.9% in 2017.

A similar pattern was observed in all four regions. Percentages for the Northeast were lower than for the nation as a whole for all years analyzed.

In 2017, the percentage was 21.1% in the Northeast, compared with 32.0% in the Midwest, 32.0% in the South, and 34.7% in the West.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2005–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ahcd/ahcd_questionnaires.htm.


Trends in Opioids Prescribed at Discharge From Emergency Departments Among Adults: United States, 2006–2017

January 8, 2020

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Trends in Opioids Prescribed at Discharge From Emergency Departments Among Adults: United States, 2006–2017.”

Q: Why did you decide to look at opioid prescribing at emergency department discharges?

AR: There is a large body of research reporting increases in opioid prescription rates from 1999 to 2010 but less is known about how rates have changed from 2010 on, particularly in the emergency department setting, where many patients present with pain symptoms and are likely to receive opioids for treatment. In response to the opioid epidemic, hundreds of local, state, and federal programs were implemented in recent years with the goal of changing prescribing practices. A goal of this report was to evaluate recent trends in opioid prescribing, in order to monitor the effects of public health policy.


Q: How did the data vary by patient/hospital characteristics and in the type of opioids prescribed at discharge?

AR: Variation in the rate of change was found for age, patient residence, and primary expected source of payment. The rate of decrease in the percentage of visits with an opioid prescribed at discharge by younger patients aged 18-44 from both the beginning of the study period (2006-2007) and from the inflection point (2010-2011) to the end of the study period (2016-2017) was the highest across all age groups. Similarly, the percentage of visits by patients living in medium or small metropolitan counties decreased by the highest percentage across the study period among all urban and rural categories. Both Medicaid and self-pay/no charge/charity experienced the highest rate of decrease from 2010-2011 through 2016-2017 whereas the percentage of visits by patients with Medicare that included an opioid prescribed at discharge remained stable across the study period.

In terms of hospital characteristics, among the four regions, the largest decrease in opioids prescribed at discharge from 2006-2007 to 2016-2017 was observed in the Northeast region. Generally, a higher percentage of visits at proprietary (or for-profit) hospital EDs, compared with nonprofit and government hospital EDs, included an opioid prescribed at discharge. Despite the high percentage, the rate of decrease among visits made to proprietary hospital EDs from 2006-2007 through 2016-2017 was modest.

In terms of the type of opioids prescribed, the percentage of opioid mentions with acetaminophen-hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin) prescribed remained stable through 2012-2013 and decreased starting from 2014-2015. Corresponding to this decrease, the percentage of opioid mentions with tramadol and acetaminophen-codeine, which are known as having a lesser risk of dependence, increased starting in 2014-2015 and continued through 2016-2017.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you?

AR: One finding that surprised me was the magnitude of decrease in the percentage of opioids prescribed from 2010-2011 through 2016-2017 for most of the pain-related diagnoses. For example, the percentage of visits for extremity and back pain decreased by 68.8% and 49.1%, respectively, between 2010-2011 and 2016-2017.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AR: Restricted data (available from the Research Data Center) collected from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey were used for this report. Masked public use data are available for download from the Ambulatory Health Care Data website (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/ahcd/datasets_documentation_related.htm)


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AR: I think the take home message of the report is recent trends show a decrease in the percentage of visits with opioids prescribed at discharge from 2010-2011 through 2016-2017, and this trend was observed for most of the patient and hospital characteristics examined, as well as for most of the pain-related diagnoses prompting the ED visit.


QuickStats: Number of Emergency Department Visits, for Substance Abuse or Dependence per 10,000 Persons Aged 18 Years or Older, by Age Group — United States, 2008–2009 and 2016–2017

December 20, 2019

The rate of emergency department visits with a primary diagnosis or primary complaint of substance abuse or dependence by patients aged 18–34 years in the United States increased from 45.4 visits per 10,000 persons in 2008–2009 to 76.0 visits in 2016–2017 but remained stable among patients aged 35 years or older (27.2 in 2008–2009 and 24.6 in 2016–2017).

In both periods, persons aged 18–34 years were more likely to visit the ED for substance abuse or dependence than those aged 35 years or older.

Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2008–2017.


Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016

November 15, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in this report?

AR: The top activities that caused emergency room (ER) visits for sports injuries by patients ages 5-24 years were football, basketball, pedal cycling, and soccer. There was wide variation by age and sex in the types of activities causing ER visits for sports injuries.


Q: Out of all of the sports, which sport or activity was found to have the largest increase in ER visits over time?

AR: We did not assess trends over time in the report.


Q: Is it accurate to say that the sports in the study are the most dangerous? Or do they have the most ER visits because they are simply the most popular?

AR: There are likely other health care utilization measures besides ER visits that others would want to look at as well, but the purpose of the report was to estimate the number of ER visits for sports injuries, and these are the sports that account for the most visits.


Q: What are some limitations of the report?

AR: The definition of sports and recreational activities relied on data processing and manual review of medical records, which could have resulted in over- or under-estimation of the sports injury ER rate. The study did not include patients who sought care in other settings or who did not seek care; thus the estimates in the report are an underestimate of all health care utilization for sports injuries.


Q: Why is this report important?

AR: Many young Americans engage in some type of sports or recreational activity each year, and sports and recreation-related injuries are a common type of injury seen in hospital ERs. It’s important to understand the types of injuries that are most commonly seen in the ER and which sports account for those injuries in order to monitor and guide injury prevention efforts. In addition, we provide updated estimates of treatments administered in the ER for sports injuries, which provides new information that can be used to monitor improvements to the quality and value of care and serve as a benchmark for future studies.


Opioids Prescribed at Discharge or Given During Emergency Department Visits Among Adults in the United States, 2016

May 31, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Opioids Prescribed at Discharge or Given During Emergency Department Visits Among Adults in the United States, 2016.”

Q: Why did you decide to focus on opioids prescribed at discharge or given during emergency department visits in the United States for this report?

AR:

Prescription opioid abuse and overdose continue to be critical public health issues. Opioid misuse, abuse, and overdose are affected by multiple factors including the number of people exposed. The Emergency Department (ED) is one setting where people could become exposed to opioids. In 2016, 27.5% of adult ED visits included opioids given in the ED, prescribed at ED discharge, or both (data not shown in report). The ED setting is where people frequently receive their first opioid treatment, after which patients with moderate to severe pain are often sent home with a prescription for an opioid, leaving them with the option of filling/not filling the prescription, or diverting filled prescriptions.

In the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), information is collected on whether drugs are given during the ED visit, prescribed at discharge, or both.  However, in our published reports, the focus is on estimates of drugs and visits with drugs rather than how they are administered.  I wanted to assess visits with opioids prescribed at discharge separately to see how they compared with those given in the ED, in order to glean new information that has not previously been reported.  This could hopefully provide additional insight into patient populations visiting the ED who are exposed to opioids.


Q: How do rates of visits with opioids only given in the ED compare with opioids only prescribed at discharge and visits with both given and prescribed opioids?

AR: Generally, the rate of ED visits with opioids given during the visit was higher than the rate of ED visits with opioids prescribed at discharge.  Compared with the rate of ED visits with opioids prescribed at discharge, the rate where opioids were only given in the ED was higher among patients aged 45 and over and for both women and men.  Adults aged 18-44 were more likely to receive a prescription for an opioid at discharge compared with adults 45 and over.


Q: How did the data vary by emergency department visits where opioids were given, prescribed or both by primary diagnosis?

AR: The type of opioid administration among ED visits where opioids were given, prescribed, or both varied for certain selected diagnoses. For visits with a primary diagnosis of injury or trauma with opioids given or prescribed, the percentage with opioids only prescribed at discharge (40.7%) was higher than both the percentage of visits with opioids only given at the ED visit (26.3%) and visits with opioids both given and prescribed at discharge (32.7). Conversely, at visits for chest pain and abdominal pain with opioids given and/or prescribed, a higher percentage of opioids were only given at the ED visit. There was no variation across the types of opioid administration for back pain and extremity pain.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

AR:I was surprised at the high percentages of visits with opioids prescribed at discharge compared with those only given in the ED for certain diagnoses.  For example, among visits with a primary diagnosis of injury or trauma and where opioids were given or prescribed, a total of 73.4% included an opioid prescription at discharge.  Among visits primarily for extremity pain and where opioids were given or prescribed, 67.9% included an opioid prescription at discharge. Finally, among visits primarily for back pain in which opioids were given or prescribed, 64.5% included an opioid prescription at discharge. However I should also note that these estimates are based only on visits where the patient got opioids during the visit or at discharge.  For example, there are other ED visits made for injury where the patient did not get opioids at all, but we did not assess this in the report.


Q: Do you foresee the number of prescription opioids at emergency department visits increasing in the future?

AR: We do not make predictions about future data trends, but other research published by CDC for recent years showed stable or declining trends in the percentage of visits with opioids given in the ED, prescribed at discharge, or both.


QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits Made by Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Among Persons Aged 18 Years or Older, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

January 11, 2019

During 2015–2016, 3.5% of adult visits to the emergency department were made by those with chronic kidney disease.

A higher percentage of visits were made by men with chronic kidney disease than women (4.1% compared with 2.7%).

The same pattern was observed for non-Hispanic black men (5.0%) and women (2.4%).

Although the pattern was similar, there was no statistically significant difference in emergency department visits by sex for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015–2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6801a7.htm