Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016

November 15, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in this report?

AR: The top activities that caused emergency room (ER) visits for sports injuries by patients ages 5-24 years were football, basketball, pedal cycling, and soccer. There was wide variation by age and sex in the types of activities causing ER visits for sports injuries.


Q: Out of all of the sports, which sport or activity was found to have the largest increase in ER visits over time?

AR: We did not assess trends over time in the report.


Q: Is it accurate to say that the sports in the study are the most dangerous? Or do they have the most ER visits because they are simply the most popular?

AR: There are likely other health care utilization measures besides ER visits that others would want to look at as well, but the purpose of the report was to estimate the number of ER visits for sports injuries, and these are the sports that account for the most visits.


Q: What are some limitations of the report?

AR: The definition of sports and recreational activities relied on data processing and manual review of medical records, which could have resulted in over- or under-estimation of the sports injury ER rate. The study did not include patients who sought care in other settings or who did not seek care; thus the estimates in the report are an underestimate of all health care utilization for sports injuries.


Q: Why is this report important?

AR: Many young Americans engage in some type of sports or recreational activity each year, and sports and recreation-related injuries are a common type of injury seen in hospital ERs. It’s important to understand the types of injuries that are most commonly seen in the ER and which sports account for those injuries in order to monitor and guide injury prevention efforts. In addition, we provide updated estimates of treatments administered in the ER for sports injuries, which provides new information that can be used to monitor improvements to the quality and value of care and serve as a benchmark for future studies.


Fact or Fiction: Is the Average Wait Time to See a Medical Professional in the Emergency Room Less Than an Hour?

November 9, 2017

Source: National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhamcs/web_tables/2014_ed_web_tables.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/videos/2017/november2017/FOFNovember2017.htm


Reasons for Emergency Room Use Among U.S. Adults Aged 18–64: National Health Interview Survey, 2013 and 2014

February 18, 2016

A new NCHS report examines the percentage of adults aged 18–64 who had an emergency room (ER) visit and their reasons for the most recent visit.

Findings:

  • In 2014, 18% of adults visited the ER one or more times.
  • Seriousness of the medical problem was the reason for the most recent ER visit for 77% of adults aged 18–64, 12% because their doctor’s office was not open, and 7% because of a lack of access to other providers (4% did not select any reason). Percentages were similar in 2013.
  • Controlling for other variables, adults with Medicaid were most likely to report that seriousness of the medical problem was the reason for the most recent ER visit.
  • Adults with private coverage were most likely to have used the ER because the doctor’s office was not open.
  • Uninsured adults were more likely than adults with private coverage to have visited the ER because they lacked access to other providers. Differences in reasons for use between demographic groups were also identified.

Reasons for Emergency Room Use Among U.S. Children: National Health Interview Survey, 2012

July 29, 2014

Emergency rooms (ERs) are intended to provide care for acute and life-threatening medical conditions for people of all ages, but use is highest among older adults and young children. In 2012, 18% of children aged 0–17 years visited the ER at least once in the past year. Rising health care costs make it important to understand the reasons that families with children seek ER care, rather than less expensive office-based or outpatient care.

Families visiting the ER at night or on weekends may have different characteristics or reasons for using the ER than those who visit during the day. Previous research among adults found that the majority visited the ER because “only a hospital could help,” or the “doctor’s office [was] not open.”

A new report provides comparable statistics on reasons for children’s ER use.

Key Findings from the Report:

 

  • In 2012, children with Medicaid coverage were more likely than uninsured children and those with private coverage to have visited the emergency room (ER) at least once in the past year.
  • About 75% of children’s most recent visits to an ER in the past 12 months took place at night or on a weekend, regardless of health insurance coverage status.
  • The seriousness of the medical problem was less likely to be the reason that children with Medicaid visited the ER at their most recent visit compared with children with private insurance.
  • Among children whose most recent visit to the ER was for reasons other than the seriousness of the medical problem, the majority visited the ER because the doctor’s office was not open.

 


Health, United States, 2012

May 30, 2013

Health, United States:2012 CoverOn May 30, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) published its annual report on the nation’s health.  Health, United States, 2012— which includes a Special Feature on Emergency Care—is the 36th report on the health status of the nation and is submitted each year by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and the Congress of the United States in compliance with Section 308 of the Public Health Service Act.

Highlights of this year’s special section on emergency care include:

  • During 2001 through 2011, both children under age 18 and adults aged 18–64 with Medicaid coverage were more likely than uninsured Americans and those with private insurance coverage to have at least one emergency room visit in the past year.
  • In 2009–2010, cold symptoms were the most common reason for emergency room visits by children (27 percent), and injuries were the most common reason for visits by adults (14 percent.)
  • Between 2000 and 2010, 35 percent of emergency room visits included an x-ray, while the use of advanced imaging scans (CT or MRI) increased from 5 percent to 17 percent of visits.
  • In 2009–2010, 81 percent of emergency department visits were discharged for follow-up care as needed, 16 percent ended with the patient being admitted to the hospital, 2 percent ended with the patient leaving without completing the visit, and less than 1 percent ended in the patient’s death.
  • In 2009–2010, 59 percent of emergency department visits (excluding hospital admissions) included at least one drug prescribed at discharge.
  • During 2001-2011, the percentage of persons with at least one emergency department visit in the past year was stable at 20 percent to 22 percent, and the percentage of persons reporting two or more visits was stable at 7 percent to 8 percent.

 Other highlights from the report include:

  • Between 2010 and 2011, the percentage of adults aged 19-25 who were uninsured decreased from 34 percent to 28 percent.
  • Expenditures for hospital care accounted for 31 percent of all national health care expenditures in 2010. Physician and clinical services accounted for 20 percent of the total, followed by prescription drugs (10 percent), and nursing care facilities and continuing care retirement communities (6 percent).
  • In 2011, 48 percent of adults aged 18 and over did not meet the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines.

More injuries cccur at home than elsewhere

September 2, 2009

More injuries occur at a person’s house than anywhere else, a new report from NCHS shows. Also, falls are still the leading cause of injury. Other information in the report includes the following:

  • In 2007, there were an estimated 34.3 million injury episodes.
  • In every year during 1997–2007, the age-adjusted rate of injury episodes among the U.S. population was higher for males than for females.
  • In every year during 1997–2007, the age-adjusted rate of injury episodes among the U.S. population was higher for those who were non-Hispanic white than for those who were non-Hispanic black and Hispanic.
  • For more, please visit the NCHS website at www.cdc.gov/nchs.

     

 

 


Report card for Nation’s health focuses on young adults aged 18-29

February 18, 2009
Young adults in the United States aged 18-29 face a number of health challenges, including increases in obesity, high injury rates, and a lack of insurance coverage compared to other adults, according to the latest report on the nation’s health from NCHS.
  • Obesity rates have tripled among young adults in the past three decades, rising from 8 percent in 1971-74 to 24 percent in 2005-06.
  • In 2006, 29 percent of young men were current cigarette smokers compared to 21 percent of young adult women.  
  • In 2005, unintentional injuries (‘‘accidents’’), homicide, and suicide accounted for 70 percent of deaths among young adults 18–29 years of age. Three-quarters of the 47,000 deaths in this age group occurred among young men. 
  • In 2006, young adults aged 20–24 were more likely to be uninsured (34 percent) than those aged 18–19 (21 percent) and those aged 25–29 (29 percent). 

    For more visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf.