Access and Utilization of Selected Preventive Health Services Among Adolescents Aged 10–17

May 11, 2016

Adolescence is a critical period for health promotion, disease prevention, and the development of healthy habits.

Regular preventive health care visits during this period are recommended to promote health and quality of life.

An NCHS report examines recent trends and demographic differences in the percentages of adolescents with a usual place for preventive care; those who had a well-child checkup in the past 12 months; and those who had a dental visit in the past 12 months.

Findings:

  • The percentages of adolescents aged 10–17 who did not have a usual place for preventive care, did not receive a well-child checkup in the past 12 months, or did not have a dental visit in the past 12 months decreased from 2008 to 2014.
  • In 2014, 2% of adolescents aged 10–17 did not have a usual place for preventive care, 21% did not receive a well-child checkup, and 12% did not have a dental visit in the past 12 months.
  • In 2014, the percentages of adolescents not having a usual place for preventive care, not receiving a well-child checkup, and not having a dental visit were higher for those aged 16–17 compared with those in younger age groups. These percentages also varied by race and ethnicity, poverty status, and insurance status.

Cigarette smoking linked to depression in adults

April 21, 2010

Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2005-2008) has found that adults ages 20 and over with depression were more likely to be cigarette smokers than those without depression.  This key finding is the focus of a new report from NCHS, “Depression and Smoking in the U.S. Household Population Aged 20 and Over, 2005-2008.” This report also found the following:                        

  • Women with depression had smoking rates similar to men with depression, while women without depression smoked less than men.
  • Over one-half of men with depression ages 40–54 were current smokers compared with 26 percent of men without depression of the same age.
  • Among women ages 40–54, of those with depression, 43 percent were smokers compared with 22 percent of those without depression.
  • Among adult smokers, those with depression smoked more heavily than those without depression. They were more likely to smoke their first cigarette within 5 minutes of awakening and to smoke more than one pack of cigarettes per day.
  • Adults with depression were less likely to quit smoking than those without depression.

The graph below shows the percentage of adult smokers with depression from 2005-2008:

 For more, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db34.pdf


Who will be drinking on St. Patty’s Day?

March 17, 2010

Who will have whiskey in the jar on one of the most popular drinking days of the year? Well, on average,  men are more likely than women to be current drinkers (68% compared with 55%). Men are also more likely to be moderate (22%) or heavy drinkers (6%) than women (7% and 4%, respectively). Youth also contributes to heavier drinking:

Other indicators:

  • White men and women are more likely to be current drinkers than other races, and non-Hispanic adults are more likely than Hispanic adults to be drinkers.
  • Current drinkers increase with education from 44% for adults with less than a high school diploma to 74% for adults with a graduate degree.
  • The prevalence of current drinking increases dramatically with family income.

For more, visit the new report on adult health behaviors at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_245.pdf.