Stat of the Day – April 27, 2017

April 27, 2017


Changes in Characteristics of Chronically Uninsured Adults: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2010–September 2016

April 27, 2017

Questions for Emily P. Zammitti, M.P.H., Associate Service Fellow and Lead Author on “Changes in Characteristics of Chronically Uninsured Adults: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2010–September 2016.”

Q: What do you mean by the “chronically uninsured?”

EZ: For the purposes of this report, persons were defined as chronically uninsured if they were uninsured at the time of interview and had lacked coverage for more than 1 year.


Q: What groups are more likely to be chronically uninsured?

EZ: We have to be careful about how we speak about the results of this report. The focus of this report is the population who are chronically uninsured. Therefore it does not address which groups are more likely to be chronically uninsured. Among the chronically uninsured, certain groups are larger than others. In the first 9 months of 2016, the proportion of chronically uninsured adults who lived in the South was larger than the proportion who lived in the Northeast, Midwest, or West regions. The proportion who were aged 45-64 was larger than the proportion who were aged 18-25, 26-34, and 35-44. The proportion who were Hispanic was larger than the proportion who were non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, and non-Hispanic other race. The proportion who rated their health as excellent or very good was larger than the proportion who rated their health as either good or fair or poor. A major focus of this report is how these proportions have changed since 2010.


Q: How many of the chronically uninsured are younger people who in many cases are healthy vs. older people who are much more likely to need insurance?

EZ: In the first 9 months of 2016, we estimate that 16% of chronically uninsured adults aged 18-64 were aged 18-25, 25.2% were aged 26-34, 26.8% were aged 35-44, and 32% were aged 45-64. Since 2010, the proportion of chronically uninsured adults who were aged 18-25 has decreased, and the proportion who were aged 35-44 and 45-64 increased. For this report, we did not disaggregate health status by age.


Q: Are there more chronically uninsured people in states that did not expand Medicaid?

EZ: We did not look at the chronically uninsured population stratified by state Medicaid expansion status for this report. However, we do look at the percent who are uninsured at the time of interview, which includes both chronically and short-term uninsured, by state Medicaid expansion status in our quarterly Health Insurance Early Release report. The percentage who are uninsured is higher in states which have not expanded Medicaid, compared with states which have expanded Medicaid.


Q: What in this new analysis did you find most interesting?

EZ: The first figure in our report shows that since 2010, the percentage of adults aged 18-64 who are chronically uninsured has been cut by more than half from 16.8% in 2010 to 7.6% in the first 9 months of 2016.


Q: When will you have full-year numbers available for 2016?

EZ: Full year 2016 Early Release data will be available on May 17th, 2017 through the Research Data Centers. That’s also when the next Health Insurance Early Release report will come out. Full year final data are expected to be released at the end of June 2017, six months after the completion of data collection.


Q: What do you make of the finding that the percent of chronically uninsured who are unemployed has been dropping while the percent who are employed has been increasing?

EZ: We don’t propose potential explanations for the results of this report, that’s outside of the scope of our work, but we did see a decrease in the proportion of chronically uninsured adults aged 18-64 who were unemployed from 16.3% in 2010 to 10.1% in the first 9 months of 2016, with a corresponding increase in the proportion who were employed during this time period.


Q: Anything else you feel is noteworthy about your study?

EZ: lthough the majority of chronically uninsured adults rate their health as excellent or very good, this proportion has not changed significantly from 2010 to the first 9 months of 2016. This means that the chronically uninsured population aged 18-64 is not more or less healthy (according to their self-rated responses) in the first 9 months of 2016 than in 2010.


Fact or Fiction: Is a growing percentage of Americans with hypertension unaware they have it?

April 26, 2017

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db278.pdf


State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm


Utilization of Clinical Preventive Services for Cancer and Heart Disease Among Insured Adults: United States, 2015

March 8, 2017

Questions for Anjel Vahratian, Supervisory Statistician (Health) and Lead Author on “Utilization of Clinical Preventive Services for Cancer and Heart Disease Among Insured Adults: United States, 2015

Q: Why did you decide to look at clinical preventive services for cancer and heart disease among insured adults?

AV: Heart disease and cancer are the top two leading causes of death in the United States. The clinical preventive services discussed in this report are recommended for the prevention or early detection of heart disease and cancer. We limited our analysis to insured adults because most insurance plans were required to cover these clinical preventive services without co-payment from the insured adult in 2015.


Q: What did your report find out about cancer screenings among insured adults?

AV: In 2015, two-thirds of insured adults aged 50-75 were screened for colorectal cancer within the recommended intervals, and screening was significantly associated with age for both men and women. Insured women aged 50-59 were more likely to be screened for colorectal cancer compared with men of the same age. Among insured women, more than 8 out of 10 of those aged 21-65 had been screened for cervical cancer, and nearly 3 out of 4 of those aged 50-74 had been screened for breast cancer within the recommended intervals.


Q: What did your report find out about heart disease screenings among insured adults?

AV: In 2015, more than 8 in 10 insured adults aged 18 and over had their blood pressure checked by a doctor or other health professional, and about 2 in 3 overweight and obese insured adults aged 40-70 had a fasting blood test for high blood sugar or diabetes in the past 12 months. Receipt of these services increased with advancing age and varied by sex. Insured women aged 18-39 and 40-64 were more likely than their male peers to have their blood pressure checked in the past 12 months, and insured overweight and obese women aged 40-49 were more likely than men of the same age and BMI to have a fasting blood test or diabetes in the past 12 months.


Q: Was there a specific finding that you found surprising?

AV: It was surprising that only 49.5% of overweight and obese insured men aged 40-49 had a fasting blood test for diabetes in the past 12 months. Diabetic adults are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, and overweight and obesity and abnormal blood glucose are modifiable cardiovascular risk factors.


Q: What is the take home message of this report?

AV: Utilization of clinical preventive services aimed at the early detection of cancer and cardiovascular disease varied by sex and age among insured adults. Insured adults in their 40s and 50s were less likely than those in their 60s to be screened for colorectal cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Limited knowledge about the recommendations for clinical preventive services may prevent eligible adults from seeking out timely preventive care.


Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January–September 2016 National Health Interview Survey

February 23, 2017
Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician

Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician

Questions for Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician and Lead Author on the “Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January–September 2016 National Health Interview Survey.”

Q: What health measures does this report look at?

TC: The measures covered in this report are lack of health insurance coverage and type of coverage, having a usual place to go for medical care, obtaining needed medical care, receipt of influenza vaccination, receipt of pneumococcal vaccination, obesity, leisure–time physical activity, current cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, general health status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma. Three of these measures (lack of health insurance coverage, leisure-time physical activity, and current cigarette smoking) are directly related to Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicators.


Q: How do you collect your data for these surveys?

TC: The data is collected by household interview surveys that are fielded continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Interviews are conducted in respondents’ homes. Health and socio-demographic information is collected on each member of all families residing within a sampled household. Within each family, additional information is collected from one randomly selected adult (the “sample adult”) aged 18 years or older and one randomly selected child (the “sample child”) aged 17 years or younger. NHIS data is collected at one point in time so we cannot determine causation. Data presented in this report are quarterly data and are preliminary.


Q: What are some of the findings that you would highlight in this early release report?

TC: Here are some findings from the early release report:

• The percentage of persons of all ages who had a usual place to go for medical care decreased, from 87.9% in 2003 to 85.4% in 2010, and then increased to 88.3% in January–September 2016.

• The percentage of persons who failed to obtain needed medical care due to cost increased, from 4.3% in 1999 to 6.9% in 2009 and 2010, and then decreased to 4.4% in January–September 2016.

• The percentage of adults aged 65 and over who had ever received a pneumococcal vaccination increased from 63.5% in 2015 to 67.3% in January–September 2016.

• The prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults aged 20 and over increased, from 19.4% in 1997 to 30.6% in January–September 2016.

• In the third quarter of 2016, 52.8% of U.S. adults aged 18 and over met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity (based on leisure-time activity). This was higher than the third quarter of 2015 estimate of 49.5%.

• The prevalence of current cigarette smoking among U.S. adults declined, from 24.7% in 1997 to 15.3% in 2015 and remained low through the third quarter of 2016 (15.9%).
• During January–September 2016, men were more likely to have had at least 1 heavy alcohol drinking day (31.6%) in the past year compared with women (18.6%).

• The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 18 and over increased, from 5.1% in 1997 to 9.2% in 2010, and has since remained stable through January–September 2016.


Q: What do the findings in this report tell us about the health of the country overall?

TC: Since 2010, the percentage of uninsured persons has decreased by almost 50% (16.0% vs 8.8%) and the percentage of persons who failed to obtain needed medical care due to cost has also shown a significant decline during the same time period (6.9% to 4.4%). These two indicators demonstrate increased access to healthcare from 2010 to September 2016.


Q: Are there any trends in this report that Americans should be concerned about?

TC: Although in the 3rd quarter of 2016, 52.8% of U.S. adults met the 2008 federal physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity; obesity is an epidemic that has seen a steady increase since 1997 and now affects just under one third (30.6%) of U.S. adults.


The Association of Marital Status and Offers of Employer-based Health Insurance for Employed Women Aged 27–64: United States, 2014–2015

January 12, 2017

Questions for Robin Cohen, Ph.D., Health Statistician and Lead Author on “The Association of Marital Status and Offers of Employer-based Health Insurance for Employed Women Aged 27–64: United States, 2014–2015

Q: Why did you decide to do a report comparing the marital status and offers of employer-based health insurance for employed women?

RC: A recent study found that women were less likely than men to have been insured through own employer and more likely to have been covered as a dependent. This report describes the association of marital status and the presence of employment-based insurance offers among employed women in the United States. It is important to note, that the presence of an offer does not necessarily indicated take-up.


Q: Is this the first time the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has released a report on this topic? If not, where is trend data available?

RC: This is the first time that NHIS has released a report on the association of marital status and of offers of employer-based private health insurance coverage for employed women.


Q: In general, how do offers of employer-based health insurance for employed women vary by marital status?

RC: Marital status is an important predictor of having an offer of health insurance through employment for employed women aged 27-64. Married women may gain an additional opportunity for an offer of health insurance coverage through their spouse’s employer. Therefore, taking all offers of health insurance into account, employed married women aged 27-64 were more likely than employed unmarried women to have an employer offer of health insurance.


Q: How do offers of employer-based health insurance vary by marital status for employed women within categories of educational attainment?

RC: Regardless of educational attainment, employed married women aged 27-64 were more likely than employed unmarried women to have been offered health insurance by their employer or their spouse’s employer. For both married and unmarried women, total health insurance offers increased as levels of educational attainment increased.


Q: Do offers of employer-based health insurance vary by marital status for employed women aged within categories of race and ethnicity?

RC: Employed non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian unmarried women were more likely than their married counterparts to have an offer of coverage from their own employer. However unmarried Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women were about as likely to have an offer of coverage from their own employer.