Sports and Recreation Related Injury Episodes in the United States, 2011-2014

November 18, 2016
Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow

Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow

Questions for Yahtyng Sheu, Senior Service Fellow and Lead Author on “Sports and Recreation Related Injury Episodes in the United States, 2011-2014

Q: How many sports and recreation related injuries are being reported annually?

YS: According to our analysis, approximately 8.6 million of sports- and recreation- related injury episodes were reported annually among persons aged 5 and over using data from the 2011-2014 National Health Interview Survey. These injury episodes were medically-attended, for which a health care professional was contacted, either in person or by telephone, for advice or treatment. Therefore, these injury episodes were not limited to those resulted in emergency department visit or hospitalization.


Q: Did the sports and recreation related injuries differ by sex and age group? If so how?

YS: Yes. The distribution of sports- and recreation-related injuries differed by both sex and age. Approximately 60% of all the sports- and recreation-related injuries were sustained by men. Children and young adults between age 5 and 24 years old also accounted for 65% of the total sport- and recreation-related injuries.


Q: What types of sports and recreation activities are causing these injuries?

YS: Our data shows that general exercise, which includes aerobics, exercising, weight training, running, jogging, and school related activity, was the most frequently mentioned activity associated with sports-and recreation-related injuries. However, it does not mean that general exercise is more likely to “cause” injuries. We are unable to study what activities are more likely to cause injuries because the National Health Interview Survey do not collect data on activity participation. This prevents us from evaluating the risk of injury for individual activity.


Q: What parts of the body were more frequently injured while engaging in sports and recreation?

YS: Lower (42%) and upper (30%) extremities were the most frequently mentioned parts of body injured while engaging in the sports and recreation activity.


Q: Why did you decide to look at sports and recreation related injuries?

YS: Many epidemiological studies of sports- and recreation-related injuries have focused on specific populations, sport activities, or outcomes. Limited number of studies have provided national estimates on overall sports- and recreation-related injuries among all population. The latest national estimates on these type of injuries (that are not limited to emergency department visits data) were derived from 1997-1999 data. As more people engage in sports and recreation activity, we feel there is a need to address the patterns of sports- and recreation- related injuries using more recent data.

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State Variation in Preventive Care Visits, by Patient Characteristics, 2012

January 25, 2016

Preventive care visits such as general medical examinations, prenatal visits, and well-baby visits give physicians and other health professionals the opportunity to screen for diseases or conditions, as well as to promote healthy behaviors that may delay or prevent these conditions and reduce subsequent use of emergency or inpatient care.

In an NCHS report, the rate of preventive care visits to office-based physicians is examined by state, patient demographics, and physician specialty. Estimates are based on data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative survey of visits to office-based physicians.

Findings:

  • In 2012, 61.4 preventive care visits were made to office-based physicians per 100 persons. The female rate (76.6 visits per 100 females) exceeded the male rate (45.4 visits per 100 males) by 69%.
  • Among the 34 most populous states, the rate of preventive care visits exceeded the national rate in 1 state (Connecticut) and was lower than the national rate in 11 states (Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Washington).
  • The rate of preventive care visits to primary care physicians in the 34 most populous states exceeded the national rate in 1 state (Connecticut) and was lower than the national rate in 7 states (Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Washington).

 


Hospitalizations for Patients Aged 85 and Over in the United States, 2000–2010

January 14, 2015

From 2000 through 2010, the number of adults aged 85 and over in the United States rose 31%, from 4.2 million to 5.5 million, and in 2010, this age group represented almost 14% of the population aged 65 and over. It is estimated that by 2050, more than 21% of adults over age 65 will be aged 85 and over. Given this increase, adults aged 85 and over are likely to account for an increasing share of hospital utilization and costs in the coming years.

An NCHS report describes hospitalizations for adults aged 85 and over with comparisons to adults aged 65–74 and 75–84.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2010, adults aged 85 and over accounted for only 2% of the U.S. population but 9% of hospital discharges.
  • From 2000 through 2010, the rate of hospitalizations for adults aged 85 and over declined from 605 to 553 hospitalizations per 1,000 population, a 9% decrease.
  • The rate of fractures and other injuries was higher for adults aged 85 and over (51 per 1,000 population) than for adults aged 65–74 (9 per 1,000 population) and 75–84 (23 per 1,000 population).
  • Adults aged 85 and over were less likely than those aged 65–74 and 75–84 to be discharged home and more likely to die in the hospital.

 


Rural Residents Who Are Hospitalized in Rural and Urban Hospitals: United States, 2010

July 18, 2014

In 2010, 17% of the U.S. population lived in rural (nonmetropolitan) areas. Many rural areas are medically underserved due to physician (especially specialist) shortages. Rural hospitals often are small, with a low volume of services, and have difficulty remaining financially viable under the regular hospital prospective payment system. Special Medicare hospital payment categories have been established so that rural residents have access to hospital care without traveling to urban areas. The share of rural residents’ hospitalizations that take place in urban (metropolitan) compared with rural hospitals has been of interest for a number of years. Those who go to urban hospitals have been described as “bypassing” rural hospitals.

A new NCHS report compares characteristics of rural residents who stay in rural areas with those who travel to urban areas for their inpatient care.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Sixty percent of the 6.1 million rural residents who were hospitalized in 2010 went to rural hospitals; the remaining 40% went to urban hospitals.
  • Rural residents who remained in rural areas for their hospitalization were more likely to be older and on Medicare compared with those who went to urban areas.
  • Almost three-quarters of rural residents who traveled to urban areas received surgical or nonsurgical procedures during their hospitalization (74%), compared with only 38% of rural residents who were hospitalized in rural hospitals.
  • More than 80% of rural residents who were discharged from urban hospitals had routine discharges (81%), generally to their homes, compared with 63% of rural residents discharged from rural hospitals.

Injury-related Emergency Department Visits by Children and Adolescents: United States, 2009–2010

May 6, 2014

Injury is the leading cause of death and a major source of morbidity among children and adolescents in the United States. The emergency department (ED) plays an important role in the care of injuries, and these visits often represent the initial contact with a provider for the injury.

A new report from NCHS examines nationally representative data on injury-related ED visits by children and adolescents aged 18 years and under in the United States during 2009–2010. Injury-related ED visit rates were also compared for the age groups 0–4, 5–12, and 13–18 years, as these correspond to the preschool, school-age, and teen life periods respectively.

 

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2009–2010, an annual average of 11.9 million injury-related emergency department (ED) visits were made by children and adolescents aged 18 years and under in the United States.
  • The injury-related ED visit rate was 151 per 1,000 persons aged 18 years and under, and rates were higher for males than for females for all age groups (0–4 years, 5–12 years, and 13–18 years).
  • The injury-related ED visit rates among persons aged 5–12 years and 13–18 years were higher for non-Hispanic black persons than for other race and ethnicity groups.
  • Leading causes of injury-related ED visits among both males and females included falls and striking against or being struck unintentionally by objects or persons. Visit rates were higher for males than for females for both of these causes.

Emergency Department Visits by Persons Aged 65 and Over

October 18, 2013

From 2000–2010, the number of persons in the United States aged 65 and over rose 15%, from 35.0 million to 40.3 million, and in 2010 this age group represented 13% of the population. It is estimated that by 2030, nearly one in five persons will be aged 65 and over. Given their growing proportion of the population, older individuals will comprise an increasing share of emergency department (ED) patients in the coming years. This is important because of the ED’s role in treating acute illness and injury in older adults and providing a pathway to these patients for hospital admission.

A new report from NCHS describes emergency department visits made by individuals aged 65 and over and compares age groups 65–74, 75–84, and 85 and over.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2009–2010, a total of 19.6 million emergency department (ED) visits in the United States were made by persons aged 65 and over. The visit rate for this age group was 511 per 1,000 persons and increased with age.
  • The percentage of ED visits made by nursing home residents, patients arriving by ambulance, and patients admitted to the hospital increased with age.
  • Twenty-nine percent of ED visits by persons aged 65 and over were related to injury, and the percentage was higher among those aged 85 and over than among those aged 65–74 or 75–84.
  • The percentage of ED visits caused by falls increased with age.

Circumcision Trends, by U.S. region, 1980-2006

January 7, 2010

Male newborn infants circumcised during hospitalizations, by U.S. region, 1980-2006: