Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016

November 15, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in this report?

AR: The top activities that caused emergency room (ER) visits for sports injuries by patients ages 5-24 years were football, basketball, pedal cycling, and soccer. There was wide variation by age and sex in the types of activities causing ER visits for sports injuries.


Q: Out of all of the sports, which sport or activity was found to have the largest increase in ER visits over time?

AR: We did not assess trends over time in the report.


Q: Is it accurate to say that the sports in the study are the most dangerous? Or do they have the most ER visits because they are simply the most popular?

AR: There are likely other health care utilization measures besides ER visits that others would want to look at as well, but the purpose of the report was to estimate the number of ER visits for sports injuries, and these are the sports that account for the most visits.


Q: What are some limitations of the report?

AR: The definition of sports and recreational activities relied on data processing and manual review of medical records, which could have resulted in over- or under-estimation of the sports injury ER rate. The study did not include patients who sought care in other settings or who did not seek care; thus the estimates in the report are an underestimate of all health care utilization for sports injuries.


Q: Why is this report important?

AR: Many young Americans engage in some type of sports or recreational activity each year, and sports and recreation-related injuries are a common type of injury seen in hospital ERs. It’s important to understand the types of injuries that are most commonly seen in the ER and which sports account for those injuries in order to monitor and guide injury prevention efforts. In addition, we provide updated estimates of treatments administered in the ER for sports injuries, which provides new information that can be used to monitor improvements to the quality and value of care and serve as a benchmark for future studies.


Unintentional Injury Death Rates in Rural and Urban Areas: United States, 1999–2017

July 16, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Henry Olaisen, EIS Fellow, of “Unintentional Injury Death Rates in Rural and Urban Areas: United States, 1999–2017.”

Q: Can you define what an unintentional injury death is?  Is there a difference in the term accidental death?

HO: Unintentional injury deaths consist of those deaths involving injuries for which there are no evidence of predetermined intent, meaning intention of harm to self or others. In 2017, the leading causes of unintentional deaths in the U.S. were drug overdose, motor vehicle crashes, and falls.

Unintentional injury deaths are a subset of injury deaths, and exclude those that are intentional (e.g. where there is intent to harm) and those where intent is unknown. Among drug overdose deaths, unintentional drug deaths comprise 87% of all deaths due to overdose.


Q: Do you have data that directly corresponds with this report that goes back further than 1999?

HO: We here at the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics have data dating back to 1959. Given our focus on unintentional injury and the changing patterns of where people live and work in the U.S., we focused on the most recent 18 years, as they are trend patterns that not only tell an important story, but can guide decision-makers and inform new policies to avoid these types of preventable deaths in the near future.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

HO: We were surprised that drug overdose death rates are not only growing fastest in the last three years in suburban counties (“large fringe counties”), but that the rate of drug overdose deaths is now (in 2017) highest in small metro and suburban counties(“large fringe counties), and lowest in rural counties.


Q: Why do you think there is a difference in unintentional injury deaths from rural and urban areas?

HO: We observed differences in trends and patterns of unintentional injury deaths using mortality data from the   National Center for Health Statistics. Determining the reasons for the difference is a really important next step, and not something we looked at in this report. We at the National Center for Health Statistics encourage scientists to use these data to help us understand the underlying causes for these observed trends and patterns.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

HO: Unintentional injury death rates – which are preventable deaths, are on the rise, with a steeper increase since 2014. Between 2014 and 2017, large fringe metro counties had the largest increase in unintentional drug overdose rates; small metro had the largest increase in motor vehicle death rates; and rural counties had the largest increase in death rates due to unintentional falls. While motor vehicle deaths have historically been the leading cause of unintentional deaths for several decades, in 2013 unintentional overdose deaths became the leading cause of unintentional deaths.


Quickstats: Rates of Injury from Sports, Recreation, and Leisure Activities Among Children and Adolescents Aged 1–17 Years, by Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2015–2017

May 24, 2019

In 2015–2017, the rate of sports, recreation, and leisure injuries among children and adolescents aged 1–17 years was 82.9 per 1,000 population.

The rate of sports, recreation, and leisure injuries increased with age from 48.4 for those aged 1–4 years, to 72.7 for those aged 5–11 years, and to 117.1 for those aged 12–17 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6820a6.htm


QuickStats: Death Rates for Motor Vehicle Traffic Injury, by Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2015 and 2017

February 15, 2019

From 2015 to 2017, death rates for motor vehicle traffic injury increased for persons aged 15 years or older.

For infants and children younger than 15 years there was no statistically significant change from 2015 to 2017, and this group had the lowest death rate (2.0 deaths per 100,000) in 2017.

The highest death rate in 2017 was for persons aged 75 years or older (19.1), followed by a 15.3 death rate for persons aged 15–34 years, and 12.8 for persons aged 35–54 and 55–74 years.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Underlying cause of death data, 1999–2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6806a8.htm?


QuickStats: Percentage of Persons of All Ages Who Had a Medically Attended Injury During the Past 3 Months by Age Group

February 8, 2019

During 2015–2017, 2.8% of persons of all ages had a medically attended injury in the past 3 months, and this varied by age.

The percentage who had a medically attended injury increased from 1.8% among those aged less than 10 years to 3.2% among those aged 10–19 years, declined to 2.5% among those aged 20–44 years, and then increased to 3.0% among those aged 45–64 years and to 3.7% among those aged 65 years or older.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6805a7.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Injury Deaths That Occurred in the Decedent’s Home for the Five Most Common Causes† of Injury Death — United States, 2016

July 9, 2018

In 2016, 31% of deaths from all causes of injury occurred in the person’s home.

The percentage varied by the cause of injury. More than half of the deaths attributable to poisoning (52%) occurred in the home.

Approximately 44% of deaths from firearms and suffocation occurred in the home.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality File. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6726a6.htm


Recent Increases in Injury Mortality Among Children and Adolescents Aged 10–19 Years in the United States: 1999–2016

June 4, 2018

NCHS released a new report that presents numbers of injury deaths and death rates for children and adolescents aged 10–19 years in the United States for 1999–2016.

Numbers and rates are presented by sex for 1999–2016, by injury intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, and homicide) and method (e.g., motor vehicle traffic, firearms, and suffocation). Numbers and rates of death according to leading injury intents and methods are shown by sex for ages 10–14 years and 15–19 years for 2016.

Findings:

  • The total death rate for persons aged 10–19 years declined 33% between 1999 (44.4 per 100,000 population) and 2013 (29.6) and then increased 12% between 2013 and 2016 (33.1).
  • This recent rise is attributable to an increase in injury deaths for persons aged 10–19 years during 2013–2016.
  • Increases occurred among all three leading injury intents (unintentional, suicide, and homicide) during 2013–2016.
  • Unintentional injury, the leading injury intent for children and adolescents aged 10–19 years in 2016, declined 49% between 1999 (20.6) and 2013 (10.6), and then increased 13% between 2013 and 2016 (12.0).
  • The death rate for suicide, the second leading injury intent among ages 10–19 years in 2016, declined 15% between 1999 and 2007 (from 4.6 to 3.9), and then increased 56% between 2007 and 2016 (6.1).
  • The death rate for homicide, the third leading intent of injury death in 2016, fluctuated and then declined 35% between 2007 (5.7) and 2014 (3.7) before increasing 27%, to 4.7 in 2016.