Most dangerous states to be riding in a car this holiday weekend

November 25, 2009

Are you driving to your Thanksgiving dinner this weekend? Beware that your risk while rolling down the highway may be higher or lower depending on the state in which you are traveling. When it comes to dying in a car accident, some states are more deadly than others, and the ones at the top may surprise you. See the chart, Car Occupant Fatalities by State, 2006, below:


10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths – Suicide Is Leading Killer

October 21, 2009

10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths in the United States in 2006, for all races, both sexes, and all ages.

10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths, United States, 2006

Produced By: Office of Statistics and Programming, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Data Source: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System.


Increase in poisonings from opioid painkillers

October 1, 2009

NCHS recently released the report titled “Increase in Fatal Poisonings Involving Opioid Analgesics in the United States, 1999-2006.” This report shows the explosion of fatal poisonings from opioid painkillers over the past 7 years. For example, from 1999 through 2006, the number of fatal poisonings involving opioid analgesics more than tripled from 4,000 to 13,800 deaths. Opioid analgesics were involved in almost 40% of all poisoning deaths in 2006.The differences among states is also striking:


Age-adjusted death rates for poisonings involving opioid analgesics: Comparison of state and U.S. rates: United Stats, 2006

For more information, visit the report at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db22.htm.


More injuries cccur at home than elsewhere

September 2, 2009

More injuries occur at a person’s house than anywhere else, a new report from NCHS shows. Also, falls are still the leading cause of injury. Other information in the report includes the following:

  • In 2007, there were an estimated 34.3 million injury episodes.
  • In every year during 1997–2007, the age-adjusted rate of injury episodes among the U.S. population was higher for males than for females.
  • In every year during 1997–2007, the age-adjusted rate of injury episodes among the U.S. population was higher for those who were non-Hispanic white than for those who were non-Hispanic black and Hispanic.
  • For more, please visit the NCHS website at www.cdc.gov/nchs.

     

 

 


A brief look at homicide

February 4, 2009

Health care use:

1.8 million emergency department visits for assault
National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2006

Mortality:

Number of deaths from homicide: 18,124
Deaths per 100,00 population: 6.1

Firearm homicide deaths: 12,352
Deaths per 100,000 population: 4.2
Deaths: Final Data for 2005


Falling Accidents In Older Adults

September 21, 2007

We have released a new report entitled Fall injury episodes among noninstitutionalized older adults: United States, 2001–2003.
fall.jpg 

From the report:

Falls are the leading cause of nonfatal medically attended injuries in the United States (1). Injuries caused by falls are more prevalent among adults aged 65 years and over compared with younger persons, occurring in 2005 at a rate of 76 episodes per 1,000 population among persons aged 65 years and over and 36 episodes per 1,000 population among persons under age 65 (CDC unpublished data, 2005). Annually, one in three Americans over age 65 years experiences a fall, and many of these falls are recurrent (2,3). Falls are associated with numerous morbidities, decreased quality of life, and high health care costs (4–6).

The report is available for download.


New Emergency Department Report

June 29, 2007

Released today. Some of the highlights

During 2005, an estimated 115.3 million visits were made to hospital EDs, about 39.6 visits per 100 persons. This represents on average roughly 30,000 visits per ED in 2005, a 31 percent increase over 1995 (23,000). Visit rates have shown an increasing trend since 1995 for persons 22–49 years of age, 50–64 years of age, and 65 years of age and over. In 2005, about 0.5 million (0.4 percent) of visits were made by homeless individuals. Nearly 18 million patients arrived by ambulance (15.5 percent). At 1.9 percent of visits, the patient had been discharged from the hospital within the previous 7 days. Abdominal pain, chest pain, fever, and cough were the leading patient complaints, accounting for nearly one-fifth of all visits. Abdominal pain was the leading illness-related diagnosis at ED visits. There were an estimated 41.9 million injury-related visits or 14.4 visits per 100 persons.


More On Drownings

June 27, 2007

As a follow up to our post on drownings we’re providing month-by-month data by race, sex, and type of drowning. This is an example of the type of data provided by the National Center for Health Statistics’s National Vital Statistics System.

Accident to watercraft causing drowning and submersion

Water‑transport‑related drowning and submersion without accident to watercraft

Drowning and submersion while in bathtub

Drowning and submersion following fall into bathtub

Drowning and submersion while in swimming pool

Drowning and submersion following fall into swimming pool

Drowning and submersion while in natural water

Drowning and submersion following fall into natural water

Other specified drowning and submersion

Unspecified drowning and submersion


Fireworks Deaths and Injuries

June 14, 2007

Fourth of July celebrations are nearly synonymous with fireworks. Fireworks can be very dangerous if used carelessly or improperly.

  • In 2003, four persons died and an estimated 9,300 were treated in emergency departments for fireworks-related injuries in the United States .
  • An estimated 5% of fireworks-related injuries treated in emergency departments required hospitalization.

 More info is available in this fact sheet.


Snakebite

May 25, 2007

Summer is upon us and with it we get a spate of questions concerning seasonal injuries and deaths. Lightning strikes. Lawn mower misadventures. Drownings. Heat stroke. And snake bites.

Injuries are tracked by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, one of 14 National Centers that together comprise the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the National Center for Health Statistics we track mortality resulting from various injuries. This data comes to us by way of death certificates filed across the nation and collated at county and state level.

Fortunately, deaths from snake bite are rare.

1999…. 7

2000…. 12

2001…. 7

2002…. 3

2003…. 2

2004…. 6