Three Largest Causes of Injury Death and Life Expectancy Between the United States and 12 Countries

February 10, 2016

Yesterday the Journal of the American Medical Association published a research letter entitled Major Causes of Injury Death and the Life Expectancy Gap Between the United States and Other High-Income Countries. From the JAMA:

The United States experiences lower life expectancy at birth than many other high-income countries. Although research has focused on mortality of the population older than 50 years, much of this life expectancy gap reflects mortality at younger ages, when mortality is dominated by injury deaths, and many decades of expected life are lost. This study estimated the contribution of 3 causes of injury death to the gap in life expectancy at birth between the United States and 12 comparable countries in 2012. We focused on motor vehicle traffic crashes, firearm-related injuries, and drug poisonings, the 3 largest causes of US injury death responsible for more than 100 000 deaths per year.

[…]

In 2012, the all-cause, age-adjusted death rate per 100 000 population was 865.1 among US men vs 772.0 among men in the comparison countries, and 624.7 among US women and 494.3 among women in the comparison countries. Men in the comparison countries had a life expectancy advantage of 2.2 years over US men (78.6 years vs 76.4 years), as did women (83.4 years vs 81.2 years). The injury causes of death accounted for 48% (1.02 years) of the life expectancy gap among men. Firearm-related injuries accounted for 21% of the gap, drug poisonings 14%, and MVT crashes 13%. Among women, these causes accounted for 19% (0.42 years) of the gap, with 4% from firearm-related injuries, 9% from drug poisonings, and 6% from MVT crashes. The 3 injury causes accounted for 6% of deaths among US men and 3% among US women.

 

 

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More Obesity Resources

July 18, 2007

We’ve written a couple of times on the subject of overweight and obesity. However, some of our research has been published in scholarly journals rather than on our website.

The journal Obesity: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Secular Trends for Childhood BMI, Weight, and Height

The journal Gastroenterology: The Epidemiology of Obesity. More data on overweight and at-risk of overweight in children.

The Journal of the American Medical Association. Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity.

The journal Clinical Nutrition and Obesity. Childhood Overweight and Family Income in the United States, 1999-2004.


Type 1 Diabetes

June 27, 2007

Yesterday the Journal of the American Medical Association published an article entitled Incidence of Diabetes in Youth in the United States. From the JAMA press release:

Non-Hispanic white youth have the highest rate of diabetes of all racial/ethnic groups for children in the U.S., with type 1 being the predominant kind of diabetes among youth, according to a study in the June 27 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on chronic diseases of children.

[…]

For children age 0 to 4 years and 5 to 9 years, most DM was type 1, regardless of race/ethnicity. The incidence of type 1 DM was highest among non-Hispanic white children, and lowest among American Indian and Asian-Pacific Islander children. Similarly, for older youth (10-14 years and 15-19 years), the incidence of type 1 DM was highest among non-Hispanic white children, followed by African American and Hispanic youth.

“…taken together [with other studies], these data suggest that the incidence of type 1 DM may be increasing in the United States, consistent with worldwide trends,” the authors write. “We estimate that the annual number of newly diagnosed youth with type 1 DM in the United States is approximately 15,000.”

Read the rest of this entry »


Morbid Obesity

June 13, 2007

Overweight and obesity data collected by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the National Center for Health Statistics show obesity increasing among Americans of all ages.

Obesity is defined as having a body mass index  (BMI) of 30 or greater.

There is a subset of obesity called morbid or extreme obesity which is defined as having a BMI of 40 or greater or weighing in excess of 100 pounds of one’s ideal weight. The National Center for Health Statistics does not track that number.

 However several of our scientists, writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) do report on this particular condition.  For the period 2003-2004 almost 5 percent of adults were extremely obese.

There JAMA articles can be found here and here.