Top 10 Leading Causes of Death: United States, 1999–2013

August 4, 2015

DA1_Leading Casues_State_Year

A new chart presents the age-adjusted death rates for the top 10 leading causes of death in the United States, including mortality patterns from 1999 through 2013, and by state of residence for selected year and cause of death.

Top 10 Leading Causes of Death: United States, 1999–2013

Data Visualization Gallery

 


STATE VITALS: NEW JERSEY

March 20, 2015

The state of New Jersey scores lower than the nation overall in births to unmarried mothers and teen births.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, the garden state has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer’s Disease, diabetes, influenza/pneumonia and suicide.

Here is a list of the 15 leading causes of death in New Jersey in 2012 with ICD 10 codes:

  1. Diseases of heart (I00-I09,I11,I13,I20-I51)
  2. Malignant neoplasms (C00-C97)
  3. Cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69)
  4. Chronic lower respiratory diseases (J40-J47)
  5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) (V01-X59,Y85-Y86)
  6. Diabetes mellitus (E10-E14)
  7. Alzheimer’s disease (G30)
  8. Septicemia (A40-A41)
  9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (N00-N07,N17-N19,N25-N27)
  10. Influenza and pneumonia (J09-J18)
  11. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (I10,I12,I15)
  12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (K70,K73-K74)
  13. Intentional self-harm (suicide) (*U03,X60-X84,Y87.0)
  14. Parkinson’s disease (G20-G21)
  15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids (J69)

January is cervical cancer awareness month…

January 6, 2010

Cervical cancer once was the leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S., and although the cases and deaths of cervical cancer have decreased over the past 40 years due largely to regular Pap tests, the disease still was responsible for almost 4,000 deaths in 2006 (most recent data available). The rates vary somewhat, but not widely, by state. See how your area compares below.

Cervical death rates per 100,000 women, United States, 2006

For more information on cervical cancer, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/index.htm.

For more information on cancer mortality, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.


How’s your state doing?

December 16, 2009

NCHS now has an easy way for you to check out where your state stands on a variety of health measures compared with the nation as a whole and other states, including the following:

  • Mortality from leading causes of death
  • Birth data, including births to unmarried mothers, teen births, cesarean deliveries, low birthweight births, prenatal care, and preterm births
  • Households using only wireless phones
  • Infant mortality rates
  • Marriage and divorce rates
  • Percentage of people under 65 without health insurance

To use this tool, click on the image below.


10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths – Suicide Is Leading Killer

October 21, 2009

10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths in the United States in 2006, for all races, both sexes, and all ages.

10 Leading Causes of Violence-Related Injury Deaths, United States, 2006

Produced By: Office of Statistics and Programming, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Data Source: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), National Vital Statistics System.


How does your state fare when it comes to death rates from flu and pneumonia?

September 16, 2009

Age-adjusted death Rates for influenza and pneumonia, 2006

Age-adjusted death rates shown here are deaths per 100,000 population.

To learn more, visit www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.


A brief look at heart disease

February 25, 2009

As a farewell to “American Heart Month,” here’s a brief synopsis of why the heart and its health affects so many of us:

  • Heart disease is the nation’s leading cause of death, responsible for 629,191 deaths in 2006 (National Vital Statistics System, 2006).
  • Heart disease is the nation’s leading diagnosis for hospitalization, at 4.2 million (National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2006).
  • Over 24 million visits to physician offices in 2006 resulted in a diagnoses of heart disease (National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2006).
  • About 11% of U.S. adults have ever been told by a doctor or other health professional they had heart disease (National Health Interview Survey, 2007).
  • About one in six Americans aged 20 years and over has elevated blood pressure and one in four has hypertension (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2004).