NCHS UPDATES”STATS OF THE STATES” PAGE WITH LATEST FINAL DATA

March 26, 2021

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The CDC National Center for Health Statistics web page “Stats of the States” has been updated to include the latest state-based final data on selected vital statistics topics, including:

  • General fertility rates
  • Teen birth rates
  • Selected other maternal and infant health measures
  • Marriage & divorce rates
  • Leading causes of death
  • Other high profile causes of death.

The site’s map pages allow users to rank states from highest to lowest or vice versa.  This latest version of “Stats of the States” also includes two new topics:  Life expectancy by state and COVID-19 death rates by state (provisional data on a quarterly basis, through Q3 of 2020).  All death rates are adjusted for age.  Rates are featured in the maps because they best illustrate the impact of a specific measure on a particular state.

The main “Stats of the States” page can be accessed at:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm


U.S. State Life Tables, 2018

March 11, 2021

New NCHS report presents complete period life tables for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia by sex based on age-specific death rates in 2018.

Key Findings:

  • Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, Hawaii had the highest life expectancy at birth, 81.0 years in 2018, and West Virginia had the lowest, 74.4 years.
  • Life expectancy at age 65 ranged from 17.5 years in Kentucky to 21.1 years in Hawaii.
  • Life expectancy at birth was higher for females in all states and the District of Columbia.
  • The difference in life expectancy between females and males ranged from 3.8 years in Utah to 6.2 years in New Mexico.

Fact or Fiction: The gap in life expectancy between the black and white populations shrinks as people age

November 19, 2020

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/videos/2020/19november2020/FOF_19November_2020.htm


World Statistics Day 2020

October 20, 2020

Happy World Statistics Day!  Here are some charts from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that rank the OECD countries by life expectancy, percentage of daily smokers and infant mortality.

NCHS will also be holding an informational webinar TODAY highlighting the NCHS Data Linkage Program.  More information can be found in the following link: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data-linkage/datalinkage-webinar.htm

For more information on World Statistics Day: https://worldstatisticsday.org/ 


Fact or Fiction: Did life Expectancy in America decline in 2017 for the third consecutive year?

June 25, 2019

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality.


2017 Final Deaths, Leading Causes of Death and Life Tables Reports Released

June 24, 2019

NCHS released a report that presents the final 2017 data on U.S. deaths, death rates, life expectancy, infant mortality, and trends, by selected characteristics such as age, sex, Hispanic origin and race, state of residence, and cause of death.

Key Findings:

  • In 2017, a total of 2,813,503 deaths were reported in the United States.
  • The age-adjusted death rate was 731.9 deaths per 100,000 U.S. standard population, an increase of 0.4% from the 2016 rate.
  • Life expectancy at birth was 78.6 years, a decrease of 0.1 year from the 2016 rate.
  • Life expectancy decreased from 2016 to 2017 for non-Hispanic white males (0.1 year) and non-Hispanic black males (0.1), and increased for non-Hispanic black females (0.1).
  • Age-specific death rates increased in 2017 from 2016 for age groups 25–34, 35–44, and 85 and over, and decreased for age groups under 1 and 45–54.
  • The 15 leading causes of death in 2017 remained the same as in 2016 although, two causes exchanged ranks.
  • Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis, the 12th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 11th leading cause of death in 2017, while Septicemia, the 11th leading cause of death in 2016, became the 12th leading cause of death in 2017.
  • The infant mortality rate, 5.79 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2017, did not change significantly from the rate of 5.87 in 2016.

NCHS also released the 2017 U.S. Life Tables and Leading Causes of Death Reports.


STAT OF THE DAY – April 11, 2018

April 11, 2018


Fact or Fiction – The last time life expectancy in the U.S. declined for two years in a row was 1962 and 1963?

December 21, 2017

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db293.pdf


United States Life Tables, 2013

April 11, 2017

A new NCHS report presents complete period life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex, based on age-specific death rates in 2013.

Findings:

  • In 2013, the overall expectation of life at birth was 78.8 years, unchanged from 2012.
  • Between 2012 and 2013, life expectancy at birth remained the same for both males (76.4) and females (81.2), for the black population (75.5), the Hispanic population (81.9), and the non-Hispanic black population (75.1).
  • Life expectancy at birth declined for both the white population (79.1 to 79.0) and the non-Hispanic white population (78.9 to 78.8).

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates, by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2014–2015

April 10, 2017

From 2014 to 2015, the age-adjusted death rate for the total U.S. population increased 1.2% from 724.6 to 733.1 per 100,000 population.

The rate increased 0.6% from 870.7 to 876.1 for non-Hispanic blacks and 1.4% from 742.8 to 753.2 for non-Hispanic whites.

The rate for Hispanic persons did not change significantly.

The highest rate was recorded for the non-Hispanic black population, followed by the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6613a6.htm