State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm

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Fact or Fiction: Is Nevada the Marriage Capital of the U.S.?

December 23, 2013

Las Vegas has earned – for better or worse – a reputation for quick weddings. The city came to be known as the Marriage Capital of the World as a result of the ease of acquiring a marriage license and the minimal costs involved. Las Vegas comprises a large part of Clark County, where the County’s website features a prominent page for marriage licenses.

So, has “the Vegas factor” been enough to position – and keep — Nevada in the U.S. lead for marriage?

According to NCHS data from the National Vital Statistics System, the Vegas factor certainly looks like it’s had major influence on the overall marriage rate in Nevada. While the state’s marriage rate has declined significantly since 1990, Nevada is still number one! The most recent marriage rate of 36.9 (provisional rate of marriages per 1,000 people performed in Nevada during 2011) shows that so many couples tie the knot in the Silver State that it ranked number one nationally in marriage rates – by a long shot. Hawaii ranked second with a marriage rate of 17.6 (due, presumably, to “the weather factor”).


New marriage and cohabitation data available

March 3, 2010

The latest in-depth data on marriage and cohabition (2002) is available here. This report features the probability that a first marriage will remain intact by sex, race, ethnicity, education, and family structure.

Marriage and Cohabitation Quick Look


How’s your state doing?

December 16, 2009

NCHS now has an easy way for you to check out where your state stands on a variety of health measures compared with the nation as a whole and other states, including the following:

  • Mortality from leading causes of death
  • Birth data, including births to unmarried mothers, teen births, cesarean deliveries, low birthweight births, prenatal care, and preterm births
  • Households using only wireless phones
  • Infant mortality rates
  • Marriage and divorce rates
  • Percentage of people under 65 without health insurance

To use this tool, click on the image below.


New Marriage and Divorce Data

September 5, 2007

Provisional marriage and divorce data for 2006 are available at the NCHS website.


Do 50% of marriages end in divorce?

July 6, 2007

We get this question all the time and the best we can say is that we don’t know. Based on data produced by the National Survey of Family Growth, 43% of first marriages by women aged 15-44 will end in a “disruption” within 15 years. Disruption is defined as either separation or divorce. As not all separations end in divorce (see Table 33 at the link) is would seem that the 50% figure is an overstatement.

The inestimable Cecil Adams of The Straight Dope takes a look at this “fact” and its probable genesis. While not endorsing this view, anyone writing about marriage and divorce should certainly consider the references he provides.

UPDATED DATA AVAILABLE HERE!


More on Marriage and Divorce Data

July 6, 2007

We posted below on the lack of detailed information on marriage and divorce. There are alternative resources available at the National Center for Health Statistics that enable one to draw inferences as to the marriage and divorce patterns of Americans.

In July 2002, we published Cohabitation, Marriage, Divorce, and Remarriage in the United States. From our press release at the time:

Among the findings in the report: unmarried cohabitations overall are less stable than marriages.  The probability of a first marriage ending in separation or divorce within 5 years is 20 percent, but the probability of a premarital cohabitation breaking up within 5 years is 49 percent.  After 10 years, the probability of a first marriage ending is 33 percent, compared with 62 percent for cohabitations.

The study suggests that both cohabitations and marriages tend to last longer under certain conditions, such as:  a woman’s age at the time cohabitation or marriage began; whether she was raised throughout childhood in an intact 2-parent family; whether religion plays an important role in her life; and whether she had a higher family income or lived in a community with high median family income, low male unemployment, and low poverty.

The tabular data provides a wealth of information cross tabbed by age, education, income, etc. It is a must-read for anyone writing on this subject. If you have questions give us a call at 301.458.4800.