Stat of the Day – June 2, 2017

June 2, 2017


QUICKSTATS: Brain Cancer Death Rates Among Children and Teens Aged 1–19 Years by Sex and Age Group — United States, 2013–2015

May 8, 2017

The death rate for brain cancer, the most common cancer cause of death for children and teens aged 1–19 years, was 24% higher in males (0.73 per 100,000) than females (0.59) aged 1–19 years during 2013–2015.

Death rates were higher for males than females for all age groups, but the difference did not reach statistical significance for the age group 5–9 years.

Death rates caused by brain cancer were highest at ages 5–9 years (0.98 for males and 0.85 for females).

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6617a5.htm


Stat of the Day – May 5, 2017

May 5, 2017


QuickStats: Death Rates for Motor Vehicle Traffic Injury, Suicide, and Homicide Among Children and Adolescents aged 10–14 Years — United States, 1999–2014

November 4, 2016

In 1999, the mortality rate for children and adolescents aged 10–14 years for deaths from motor vehicle traffic injury (4.5 per 100,000) was about four times higher than the rate for deaths for suicide and homicide (both at 1.2).

From 1999 to 2014, the death rate for motor vehicle traffic injury declined 58%, to 1.9 in 2014 (384 deaths).

From 1999 to 2007, the death rate for suicide fluctuated and then doubled from 2007 (0.9) to 2014 (2.1, 425 deaths).

The death rate for homicide gradually declined to 0.8 in 2014. In 2013 and 2014, the differences between death rates for motor vehicle traffic injury and suicide were not statistically significant.

Sourcehttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6543a8.htm


CDC’s Abortion Surveillance Report

August 16, 2007

podcast.pngThe National Center for Health Statistics does not track the number of abortions. Abortions are tracked through CDC’s Abortion Surveillance System and reported annually in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Reports covering 1979 through the most current report are located at the above link. Typically, these reports are published in the last week of November and lag three years.

Click the icon for a CDC podcast on the abortion surveillance system


Heart attacks and hospitalization

July 6, 2007

Every week the National Center for Health Statistics produces a feature called QuickStats for the CDC’s publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report which highlights interesting and relevant data from NCHS data collection programs.

This week it highlights hospitalizations rates for coronary atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction for the period 1996-2005. These data come from the National Hospital Discharge Survey.

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Chronic Kidney Disease

June 27, 2007

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publication Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report:

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a serious condition associated with premature mortality, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care expenditures. Untreated CKD can result in end-stage renal disease and necessitate dialysis or kidney transplantation. Risk factors for CKD include cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and obesity (1–3). To estimate the prevalence of CKD in the United States (overall and by health risk factors and other characteristics), CDC analyzed the most recent data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

About 16.8% of the US population aged 20 and older suffer from this condition. Among adults with diabetes that number is 40.2%.