Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Adults Aged 18–64 in the United States, 2019

September 30, 2020

Questions for Amy Cha, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Reasons for Being Uninsured Among Adults Aged 18–64 in the United States, 2019.”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on this topic?

AC: In 2019, 14.5% of adults aged 18–64 were uninsured in the United States. Individuals without health insurance experience barriers to health care such as not having a usual source of care and postponing or forgoing care due to cost, which may lead to negative health outcomes. Therefore, in this report we evaluated the characteristics of uninsured adults aged 18–64 in 2019 and the percentage among uninsured adults who identified with six reasons for being currently uninsured.


Q: Was there a specific funding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AC: We were surprised that the percentage of adults who were uninsured due to cost was higher among women and adults in fair or poor health. The percentage who were uninsured due to cost increased with age from 66.8% among those aged 18–29 to 80.9% among those 50─64.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AC: The data for this report came from the 2019 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Sample Adult component. NHIS is a nationally representative, household survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population. In 2019, the NHIS questionnaire was redesigned to better meet the needs of data users. The data is publicly available on the NHIS website (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis) with detailed data documentation.


Q: Is there any trend data for this report? If so, where can I find this data?

AC: We do not have any trend data for this report. With the NHIS redesign, questions concerning the reasons for being uninsured were asked in a different manner than in previous surveys and therefore are not comparable.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AC: Among uninsured adults aged 18–64, the most common reason for being currently uninsured was because they perceived that they could not afford the cost of coverage, followed by not being eligible, not wanting coverage, the process of signing up was too difficult or confusing, could not find a plan that meets their needs, and they signed up for coverage, but the plan has not started yet.


Health of American Indian and Alaska Native Adults, by Urbanization Level: United States, 2014–2018

August 6, 2020

Questions for Maria Villarroel, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Health of American Indian and Alaska Native Adults, by Urbanization Level: United States, 2014–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on health in American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) adults?

MV: There is limited information about the health of the American Indian and Alaska Native adults at the national level. Few national surveys are large enough to be able to provide reliable estimates about American Indian and Alaska Native adults. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is one such survey that can inform on the health status and health conditions of civilian non-institutionalized adults residing in households across the country who identify as American Indian and Alaska Native.


Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by urbanization level?

MV: This report has two objectives.

The first objective was to compare the health of American Indian and Alaska Native adults by urbanization level.  The report findings indicate that the conditions examined did not follow a single pattern by urbanization level. The percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native adults with disabilities increased with higher urbanization level, multiple chronic conditions increased with lower urbanization level, diagnosed diabetes was highest in rural areas, diagnosed hypertension was highest for those in medium and small metropolitan areas and in rural areas, and those in fair or poor health status did not differ by urbanization level.

The second objective was to assess whether the percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native adults with selected conditions was similar to the percentage found, on average, among all U.S. adults. The report findings indicate that American Indian and Alaska Native adults were more likely to be in fair or poor health, have a disability, have multiple chronic conditions, and to have been diagnosed with hypertension and diabetes compared with all U.S. adults. This finding was consistent across most urbanization levels.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

MV: Among American Indian and Alaska Native adults, the selected conditions examined did not follow a single pattern by urbanization level, and that across most urbanization levels, the percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native adults with these selected conditions was higher than found on average among U.S. adults.


Q: Is this the first time you have reported data on AIAN?  If not, do you have any trend data?

MV: Yes, this is the first time we have used NHIS data to examine selected health conditions among American Indian and Alaska Native adults in the US. We are not aware of a previous trend report and have not examined trends among this population ourselves.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

MV: Among American Indian and Alaska Native adults, the conditions examined did not follow a single pattern by urbanization level, and across most urbanization levels, the percentage of American Indian and Alaska Native adults with these selected conditions was higher than found on average among U.S. adults.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Received Colorectal Cancer Screening by Poverty Status and Year — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2010 and 2018

July 24, 2020

The percentage of adults aged 50–75 years who received colorectal cancer tests or procedures increased from 58.7% in 2010 to 65.5% in 2018.

The percentage increased from 2010 to 2018 in all income groups: from 37.9% to 53.1% among poor, 47.9% to 56.7% among near poor, and 63.6% to 68.7% among not poor adults.

In both 2010 and 2018, the percentage of adults who received colorectal cancer screening was lowest among poor and highest among not poor adults.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2010 and 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6929a6.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Who Volunteered or Worked in a Hospital, Medical Clinic, Doctor’s Office, Dentist’s Office, Nursing Home, or Some Other Health Care Facility by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2016–2018

July 17, 2020

During 2016–2018, women aged 18 years or older were more likely to volunteer or work in a hospital, medical clinic, doctor’s office, dentist’s office, nursing home, or some other health care facility (health care settings) than were men (12.3% compared with 5.2%).

Non-Hispanic black (15.8%), Asian (12.8%), and white women (12.3%) were more likely to volunteer or work in health care settings than were Hispanic women (9.6%).

Non-Hispanic Asian men (7.6%) were more likely to volunteer or work in health care settings than were black (6.0%), white (5.3%), and Hispanic men (3.8%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2016–2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6928a7.htm

 


Selected Financial Burdens of Health Care Among Families With Older Adults, by Family Composition: United States, 2017–2018

July 15, 2020

Questions for Robin Cohen, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Selected Financial Burdens of Health Care Among Families With Older Adults, by Family Composition: United States, 2017–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on financial burdens to health care among U.S. families with older adults?

RC: Living arrangements are associated with financial status. Sharing financial resources may offer financial stability to the family.  Financial stability has been associated with one’s ability to pay for medical expenses. However, little is known how financial burdens for medical care differ among older adult families in the United States.


Q: Can you summarize some of the data in the report?

RC: About 8.6% of families with older adults experienced problems paying medical bills and 8.9% had forgone medical care. Older-adult families with at least one child were most likely to experience problems paying medical bills and to have forgone medical care. Older-adult families with only two older adults were the least likely to have experienced problems paying medical bills and to have forgone medical care.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

RC: After adjusting for selected family characteristics in multivariate analyses, the odds of experiencing problems paying medical bills and forgone medical care weakened for all family compositions but remained significantly lower for families with only two older adults.


Q: Is there any trend data that goes back further than 2017?

RC: This is the first time that we have looked at older adult families with the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). However, NHIS data is available to examine this issue back to 2011.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

RC: The findings from this report support the premise that older-adult families with different family compositions experience different levels of financial barriers to medical care.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥65 Years Who Received Care at Home From a Nurse or Other Health Care Professional During the Past 12 Months

July 10, 2020

In 2018, the percentage of adults aged ≥65 years who received care at home from a nurse or other health care professional during the past 12 months increased with age from 4.5% for adults aged 65–69 years, to 8.2% for those aged 70–74 years and 13.2% for those aged ≥75 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6927a7.htm


Shingles Vaccination Among Adults Aged 60 and Over: United States, 2018

July 9, 2020

Questions for Emily Terlizzi, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Shingles Vaccination Among Adults Aged 60 and Over: United States, 2018.”

Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin, and education?

ET: In 2018, the percentage of adults aged 60 and over who had ever received a shingles vaccine was higher among older adults, non-Hispanic whites, and those who were not poor or had more than a high school diploma or GED. Shingles receipt did not significantly differ by sex.


Q: Are there any trend data that goes back further than 2008?

ET: NHIS trend data on shingles vaccination is not available before 2008, as this was the first year the NHIS asked about this vaccination.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

ET: Shingles vaccination has increased since 2008, however, disparities in receipt of this vaccination still remain.


Q: What resources does the CDC have on shingles vaccination?

ET: The CDC has a lot of useful information online about shingles vaccination. For more information, please visit:

Click to access db370-h.pdf


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Currently Have Asthma by Sex and Race/Ethnicity

June 26, 2020

During 2017–2018, women aged 18 years or older were more likely than men (9.7% versus 5.5%) to currently have asthma.

This pattern prevailed in each of the race/ethnicity groups: Hispanic adults (7.8% versus 3.9%); non-Hispanic white adults (10.3% versus 5.9%); non-Hispanic black adults (11.4% versus 6.2%); and non-Hispanic Asian adults (5.0% versus 3.3%).

Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men were more likely to currently have asthma than were Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian men.

The same pattern existed among women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017–2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6925a7.htm


QuickStats: Reason for the Most Recent Colonoscopy Among Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Had a Test in the Past 10 Years

June 19, 2020

In 2018, 60.6% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years without a personal history of colorectal cancer had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years.

Of these, 81.2% had their most recent colonoscopy as part of routine screening, 10.6% had their most recent colonoscopy because of a problem, 5.2% as a follow-up to an earlier test or screening exam, and 2.8% for some other reason.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6924a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Families That Did Not Get Needed Medical Care Because of Cost by Poverty Status

June 12, 2020

The percentage of all families that did not get needed medical care because of cost in the past 12 months decreased from 12.1% in 2013 to 9.7% 2018.

From 2013 to 2018, the percentage of poor families that did not get medical care decreased (22.7% to 17.3%) as did the percentage of near-poor families (20.4% to 16.0%); no significant change occurred for not-poor families (7.1% and 6.6%).

In 2013 and 2018, the percentage of families that did not get needed medical care because of cost was lowest among the not poor.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2013 and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6923a4.htm