FACT OR FICTION VIDEO: Stressful Life Events Among Children

September 16, 2021

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/videos/2021/september2021/fof_Sept2021.htm


National Health Interview Survey Releases 7 New Early Release Products

August 31, 2021

The National Health Interview Survey Early Release Program has released 7 new products that include data on health insurance, key health indicators and wirless phone use.

The new products include a report that presents estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the 2020 National Health Interview Survey.

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Adolescents Aged 0–17 Years Who Have Experienced a Specified Stressful Life Event, by Type of Event and Poverty Status

August 27, 2021

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In 2019, 20.7% of children and adolescents in families with incomes <200% of the poverty threshold and 12.6% of children and adolescents in families with incomes ≥200% of the poverty threshold had experienced at least one specified stressful life event.

Children and adolescents in families with incomes <200% of the poverty threshold were more likely than children and adolescents in families with incomes ≥200% of the poverty threshold to have been the victim or witnessed violence (8.1% versus 3.5%); lived with someone who had been in jail (8.7% versus 3.5%); lived with a person with problems with mental health or depression (10.1% versus 6.4%); or lived with a person with problems with alcohol or drugs (10.2% versus 6.5%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7034a7.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 65 Years or Older Who Have a Lot of Difficulty Hearing or Cannot Hear at All Even When Using Hearing Aids by Urbanization Level

August 20, 2021

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In 2019, 4.2% of U.S. adults aged 65 years or older had a lot of difficulty hearing or could not hear at all even when using hearing aids.

Percentages were highest in nonmetropolitan areas (6.7%).

The differences between percentages in large central (3.2%), large fringe metropolitan (3.2%), and medium and small metropolitan (4.3%) areas were not statistically significant.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7033a7.htm


Geographic Variation in Health Insurance Coverage: United States, 2019

August 6, 2021

NHSR162_Cover1NCHS releases a new report that presents state, regional, and national estimates of the percentage of persons who were uninsured, had private health insurance coverage, and had public health insurance coverage at the time of the interview.

Key Findings: 

  • In 2019, among persons under age 65, 12.0% were uninsured, 64.3% had private coverage, and 25.9% had public coverage at the time of the interview.
  • Among adults aged 18–64 (working-age adults), the percent uninsured ranged from 12.4% for those living in large fringe (suburban) metropolitan counties to 17.5% for those living in nonmetropolitan counties.
  • Working-age adults living in non-Medicaid expansion states (20.8%) were about twice as likely to be uninsured compared with those living in Medicaid expansion states (10.9%). Similar patterns were observed among children
    aged 0–17 years.
  • The percentage of working-age adults who were uninsured was significantly higher than the national average (14.5%) in Florida (20.6%), Georgia (22.3%), Oklahoma (25.6%), and Texas (30.5%), and significantly lower than the national average in California (11.5%), Minnesota (6.9%), New York (7.4%), Ohio (10.8%), Pennsylvania (9.8%), and Wisconsin (7.7%).
  • The percentage of people under age 65 who were uninsured was lowest in the New England region (4.6%).


Prescription Opioid Use Among Adults With Chronic Pain: United States, 2019

August 5, 2021

Questions for Jim Dahlhamer, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Prescription Opioid Use Among Adults With Chronic Pain: United States, 2019.”

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Q: Why did you decide to do a report on prescription opioid use among U.S. adults with chronic pain?

JD: The latest estimate from NHIS reveals that just over 20% of U.S. adults experience chronic pain. Opioids are widely prescribed for the treatment of chronic pain in this country, even though questions remain as to their efficacy for such treatment. In the context of chronic pain management, some studies have shown prescription opioid use to be associated with an increased risk of misuse, addiction, morbidity, and mortality.  Yet, surprisingly, we found only a handful of national estimates of prescription opioid use among adults with chronic pain. With that in mind, our goal was to produce national estimates of prescription opioid use among adults with chronic pain, overall and by sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics such as age, sex, educational attainment, and poverty status. Our hope is that the report provides baseline estimates for continued surveillance of prescription opioid use among adults with chronic pain. These and future results may shed light on subgroups potentially at higher risk of negative outcomes associated with prescription opioid use.


Q: How does the data vary by different demographics?

JD: Prescription opioid use among adults with chronic pain varied across a range of sociodemographic and socioeconomic subgroups. We found that men and employed adults were less likely to have used a prescription opioid compared with women and not employed adults. Prescription opioid use increased with age among adults aged 18–64 and decreased among adults aged 65 and over. Adults from higher socioeconomic backgrounds, as measured by their educational attainment and family income as a percentage of the federal poverty level, were less likely to have used prescription opioids compared with those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Finally, adults with private health insurance coverage, Medicare, or Medicaid or other forms of public coverage were more likely to have used a prescription opioid than uninsured adults.


Q: Do you have trend data?

JD: NHIS included questions on pain and opioid use in 2020, so this analysis could be repeated to see how these estimates may have changed, especially in the context of COVID-19. However, opioid questions are not included on the 2021 NHIS and we don’t know at this time when they may be asked in the future.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

JD: Nearly a quarter of U.S. adults with chronic pain used a prescription opioid in the past 3 months, with use varying across a range of sociodemographic and socioeconomic subgroups. Estimates in this report can be used as a starting point for continued monitoring of prescription opioid use among adults with chronic pain in the U.S., potentially shedding light on subgroups at greater risk of negative outcomes associated with opioid use.


Q: Do you have data on prescription opioid use by state?

JD: Data on prescription opioid use by state would be available through the NCHS Research Data Center. We have not looked at the data by state so we can’t speak to the number of states for which reliable estimates could be produced. It is likely that number would increase once 2020 data are available as a data user could then combine or pool 2019 and 2020 data.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older With Fair or Poor Health by Urbanization Level and Age Group

July 30, 2021

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In 2019, the percentage of adults aged 18 years or older reported to be in fair or poor health was higher among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (20.3%) than among those living in metropolitan areas (14.5%).

Percentages in fair or poor health were higher in nonmetropolitan areas for those aged 18–39 years (10.9% versus 7.4%) and 40–64 years (22.9% versus 16.2%), but the difference by urbanization level did not reach statistical significance for adults aged 65 years or older (27.2% versus 24.7%).

The percentage reporting fair or poor health increased with age in both nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7030a3.htm


NCHS Releases New Reports This Week on Hearing Difficulty and Back/Limb pain among U.S. Adults

July 29, 2021

NCHS Releases two new reports this week on hearing difficulty and back/limb pain.

DB414_COver1The first report presents difficulties with hearing even when using a hearing aid among U.S. adults aged 18 and over by level of difficulty and age, sex, and race and Hispanic origin. It also presents estimates of the prevalence of hearing aid use among adults aged 45 and over to focus on the age group with higher rates of hearing difficulties.

Key Findings:

  • In 2019, 13.0% of adults aged 18 and over had some difficulty hearing even when using a hearing aid and 1.6% either had a lot of difficulty hearing or could not hear at all, even when using a hearing aid.
  • Hearing difficulties increased with age with 26.8% of those aged 65 and over having some difficulty and 4.1% having a lot of difficulty or could not hear at all.
  • Among adults aged 45 and over, men were more likely than women to have had some or a lot of difficulty or could
    not hear at all.
  • Non-Hispanic white adults aged 45–64 had higher rates of some difficulty, a lot of difficulty, or being unable to
    hear at all, compared with other race and Hispanic origin groups.
  • In 2019, 7.1% of adults aged 45 and over used a hearing aid; use was higher among men than women in all age groups.

DB415_Cover1The second report provides national estimates of any pain regardless of body region as well as estimates of back, lower limb (hips, knees, or feet), and upper limb (hands, arms, or shoulders) pain in the past 3 months among U.S. adults aged 18 and over by selected sociodemographic characteristics.

Key Findings:

  • In 2019, 39.0% of adults had back pain, 36.5% had lower limb pain, and 30.7% had upper limb pain in the past 3 months.
  • Adults aged 65 and over, women, non-Hispanic white adults, and those with income below 100% of the federal poverty level (FPL) were most likely to experience back pain.
  • Adults aged 18–29 (21.0%), men (33.5%), non-Hispanic Asian adults (20.6%), and those with income 200% of FPL or
    above (35.2%) were least likely to experience lower limb pain.
  • Adults aged 65 and over, women, non-Hispanic white adults, and those with income below 100% of FPL were most likely to experience

Urban-rural Differences in Dental Care Use Among Adults Aged 18−64

July 7, 2021

DB412_Cover1Questions for Amy Cha, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Urban-rural Differences in Dental Care Use Among Adults Aged 18−64.”

Q: How does the data vary by sex, race, and income level?

AC: In both urban and rural areas, the percentage of adults aged 18-64 who had a dental visit in the past 12 months was higher among women and non-Hispanic white adults than men and Hispanic adults. Also, the percentage of adults who had a dental visit increased as family income increased in both urban and rural areas.


Q: Why did you decide to look at dental visits by urbanicity?

AC: Studies have shown that disparities exist in access to and use of dental care, especially between rural and urban areas. So, we decided to look at dental visits by urbanicity.


Q: Were you surprised by any of the findings in this report?

AC: We were surprised that the percentage of adults aged 18-64 with a dental visit in the past 12 months was significantly different between those residing in urban and rural areas.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

AC: This report examined urban-rural differences in dental care use among adults aged 18-64, and its variation by sex, race and ethnicity, and family income as a percentage of the federal poverty level.


Q: Anything else that you would like share from the report?

AC: It has been reported that persons living in rural areas were less likely to have a preventive dental visit, but more likely to seek emergency dental treatment than those residing in urban areas. As shown in this report, the lower percentage of dental care utilization in rural areas may be attributed to the lower density of dental care providers in these areas.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Diagnosed Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, by Urbanization Level and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2019

July 2, 2021

In 2019, the percentage of adults aged 18 years or older with diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was higher among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (8.0%) than among those living in metropolitan areas (4.0%).

Percentages were higher in nonmetropolitan areas for adults aged 45–64 years (10.0% versus 4.8%) and aged 65 years or older (14.5% versus 9.5%), but the difference by urbanization level was not statistically significant for adults aged 18–44 years (1.9% versus 1.2%).

The prevalence of diagnosed COPD increased with age in both nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7026a3.htm