QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Reported That They Needed Dental Care During the Past 12 Months But Didn’t Get It Because They Couldn’t Afford It, by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin

March 22, 2019

In 2017, more women (12.7%) than men (8.8%) reported that at some time during the past 12 months they needed dental care but didn’t get it because they couldn’t afford it.

This pattern was consistent within each racial/ethnic group: Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black.

Among both men and women, Hispanic adults were most likely to have unmet needs for dental care because they couldn’t afford it.

Nearly 17% of Hispanic women could not afford to meet their dental care needs, compared with 12.8% of non-Hispanic black women and 11.8% of non-Hispanic white women; 12.3% of Hispanic men had unmet dental care needs, compared with 8.6% of non-Hispanic black men and 8.3% of non-Hispanic white men.

Source: Tables of Summary Health Statistics, 2017.

https://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2017_SHS_Table_A-19.pdf.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6811a4.htm

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Strategies Used by Adults Aged 18–64 to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017

March 19, 2019

A new NCHS report examines changes over time in the percentage of adults aged 18–64 who were prescribed medication and reported using these selected strategies to reduce their prescription drug costs in the past 12 months.

Key Findings:

  • Among adults aged 18–64 who were prescribed medication in the past 12 months, the percentage who used selected strategies to reduce their prescription drug costs in the past 12 months decreased from 2013 through 2015 and then remained stable from 2015 through 2017.
  • In 2017, among adults aged 18–64 who were prescribed medication, women were more likely than men to use selected strategies to reduce their prescription drug costs.
  • In 2017, strategies for reducing prescription drug costs were most commonly practiced among those who were uninsured compared with those with private insurance or Medicaid, as 39.5% asked their doctor for a lower-cost medication, 33.6% did not take their medication as prescribed, and 13.9% used alternative therapies.

Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-September 2018 National Health Interview Survey

March 13, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician, of “Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-September 2018 National Health Interview Survey.”

Q: What exactly is an MSA?

TC: According the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), a Metropolitan Statistical Area is where one or more adjacent counties or county equivalents have at least one urban center/core area with a population of at least 50,000, plus adjacent territory that has a high degree of social and economic integration with the center as measured by commuting ties.


Q: What do the findings in this report tell us about the health of the country overall?

TC: Americans are exercising more in their leisure (spare) time, yet the prevalence of obesity and diabetes is increasing.


Q: Are there any trends in this report that Americans should be concerned about?

TC: The prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults aged 20 and over increased, from 26.4% in 2006 to 31.7% in January–September 2018 and the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 18 and over increased, from 7.8% in 2006 to 10.1% in January–September 2018.


Q: Why are women more likely to have diabetes compared with men?

TC: The National Health Interview survey does not collect information to answer this question.

You may learn about these reasons from speaking with a physician or a registered dietician.


Q: Why does diabetes increase with age?

TC: The National Health Interview survey does not collect information to answer this question.

You may learn about these reasons from speaking with a physician or a registered dietician.


Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–September 2018

February 27, 2019

Questions for Emily P. Terlizzi, M.P.H., Health Statistician and Lead Author on “Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–September 2018

Q: How did the uninsured vary by age groups in this report?

ET: In the first 9 months of 2018, 9.2% of persons of all ages, 10.8% of persons under age 65, 4.9% of children, and 13% of adults aged 18-64 lacked health insurance at the time of interview.


Q: How did the uninsured vary by race in this report?

ET: In the first 9 months of 2018, 26.3% of Hispanic, 14.7% of non-Hispanic black, 8.8% of non-Hispanic white, and 8.2% of non-Hispanic Asian adults aged 18–64 lacked health insurance coverage at the time of interview.


Q: How did the uninsured vary by regions in the United States?

ET: In the first 9 months of 2018, 7.3% of adults aged 18-64 living in the Northeast, 11% of those living in the Midwest, 18.1% of those living in the South, and 11.2% of those living in the West lacked health insurance coverage at the time of interview.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

ET: I think the take-home message from this report is found in the number of Americans who no longer lack health insurance. In the first 9 months of 2018, 29.7 million (9.2%) persons of all ages were uninsured at the time of interview. This estimate is not significantly different from 2017, but there are 18.9 million fewer uninsured persons than in 2010.


QuickStats: Percentage of Persons of All Ages Who Had a Medically Attended Injury During the Past 3 Months by Age Group

February 8, 2019

During 2015–2017, 2.8% of persons of all ages had a medically attended injury in the past 3 months, and this varied by age.

The percentage who had a medically attended injury increased from 1.8% among those aged less than 10 years to 3.2% among those aged 10–19 years, declined to 2.5% among those aged 20–44 years, and then increased to 3.0% among those aged 45–64 years and to 3.7% among those aged 65 years or older.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6805a7.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Had an Influenza Vaccination† in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Current Asthma Status

January 18, 2019

In 2017, adults aged 18–64 years with current asthma were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months (47.9%) than those without asthma (36.4%).

Regardless of asthma status, women were more likely than men to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.

Women aged 18–64 years with current asthma (51.3%) were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination than men with current asthma in this age group (41.6%).

Among adults aged 18–64 years without asthma, women also were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination (40.0%) than were men (32.8%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6802a7.htm


Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-June 2018 National Health Interview Survey

December 6, 2018

Questions for Lead Author Tainya C. Clarke, Ph.D., M.P.H., Health Statistician, of “Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From January-June 2018 National Health Interview Survey.”

Q: What are some of the findings that you would highlight in this early release report?

TC:  Diabetes and obesity continue to increase among U.S. adults.  The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes among adults aged 18 and over increased from 7.8% in 2006 to 10.2% in January–June 2018.  During the same period the prevalence of obesity among U.S. adults aged 20 and over increased from 26.4%  to 31.7%.


Q: What do the findings in this report tell us about the health of the country overall?

TC:  The health of our nation is multifaceted and quite complex. While we make improvements in some areas, such as increased leisure time physical activity and declining smoking rates, other areas leave a lot to be desired. The prevalence of diabetes and obesity continue to rise.


Q: Are there any trends in this report that Americans should be concerned about?

TC: Yes, the observed increase in the prevalence of diabetes and obesity, suggests that Americans need to work towards achieving a healthy balance between dietary intake and exercise.


Q: Why did you decide to only look back to 2006?  Previous NHIS Early Release reports went back to 1997?

TC: The Early Release Key Health Indicators report transitioned from static quarterly reports to a dynamic report back in June 2018. In the previous format, we included estimates back to 1997, but the trend results were getting unwieldy to produce and interpret on a quarterly basis.  Thus, we made the decision to start the trends at 2006 for the newer format.  Readers can still go back and view the static reports and combined with the dynamic report, they can construct the longer trend.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

TC: Americans are making significant improvement is some aspects of health, but are falling short in others.