QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Who Have Paid Sick Leave, by Industry — National Health Interview Survey, 2009 and 2018

August 30, 2019

The percentage of all currently employed workers with access to paid sick leave increased from 57.8% in 2009 to 62.4% in 2018.

By industry, the percentage increased for workers in construction (32.7% to 43.9%), wholesale & retail trade (48.3% to 53.1%), services (56.7% to 60.8%), and manufacturing (60.7% to 65.5%).

In 2018, fewer than half of workers in agriculture, forestry, and fishing and construction industries had access to paid sick leave compared to approximately 90% of workers in public administration.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2009–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

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Strategies Used by Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017–2018

August 21, 2019

Questions for Robin Cohen, Ph.D. and Lead Author of ”Strategies Used by Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017-2018.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in your report?

RC: Among adults with diagnosed diabetes, more than 13 percent did not take their medication as prescribed to save money and almost 1 in 4 asked their doctor for a lower cost medication.


Q: Do you have other data that would put these diabetes findings in context with other diseases?

RC: We have not looked at strategies adults use to reduce their prescription for other diseases. However, two previously published reports examined strategies used by adults aged 18-64 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db333.htm) and by adults aged 65 and over (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db335.htm) to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2016-2017.


Q: Do you have any data on this topic for earlier years?

RC: We do not have reports addressing strategies used by adults with diagnosed diabetes for earlier years. However, two previous reports examined strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2011 and 2013.


Q: Which age group or demographic group seems to be having the biggest problem with the cost of diabetes medication or with taking their medication?

RC: Among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes who were prescribed medication in the past 12 months, the percentages of adults who did not take their medication as prescribed to reduce their prescription drug costs were highest among women and adults under age 65.  Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.


Q: Any other significant points you’d like to make about your report?

RC: Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.


Eye Disorders and Vision Loss among U.S. Adults Aged 45 and Over with Diagnosed Diabetes

July 18, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Amy Cha, Statistician, of “Eye Disorders and Vision Loss among U.S. Adults Aged 45 and Over with Diagnosed Diabetes.”

Q: Why did you decide to focus on eye disorder and vision loss for adults aged 45 or older with diagnosed diabetes for this report?

AC: The prevalence of diabetes increases with age. Eye disorders are a frequent complication from diabetes and vision loss is a severe condition that often has a negative impact on a person’s quality of life and mental health. Moreover, duration of diabetes is a risk factor for the progression of visual problems.

This report compared the age-adjusted percentages of older adults (aged 45 and over) with diagnosed diabetes who were told by a doctor or other health professional that they had cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or macular degeneration and vision loss due to these disorders, by years since their diabetes diagnosis.


Q: Do you have data that directly corresponds with this report that goes back further than 2016?

AC: Data on diabetes, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration were collected in 2002 and 2008 by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). However, this is the first report covering the prevalence of eye disorders and vision loss among older adults with diagnosed diabetes.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

AC: We were surprised that even after accounting for age, adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were still more likely to have eye disorders than those having diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years.


Q: Why is it that so many adults with diagnosed diabetes have cataracts?

AC: Diabetes can affect many parts of the body. This report did not examine the causal pathway of diabetes and cataracts.  This report focused on the prevalence of eye disorders by years since diabetes diagnosis in adults aged 45 and older.  We compared two time intervals, those who were diagnosed more recently – less than 10 years, and those who were  diagnosed with diabetes a longer time – 10 years or more. Cataracts and vision loss due to cataracts were both associated with longer duration since diabetes diagnosis.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AC: Adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were more likely to report cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration than those with diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years. In addition, adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were more likely to report vision loss due to cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration than those having diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years.


Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, July–December 2018

June 27, 2019

Preliminary results from the July–December 2018 National Health Interview Survey indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow.

More than one-half of American homes (57.1%) had only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the second half of 2018—an increase of 3.2 percentage points since the second half of 2017.

More than three in four adults aged 25-34 (76.5%), and a similar percentage of adults renting their homes (75.5%), were living in wireless-only households.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Have Lost All of Their Natural Teeth, by Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, 2000 and 2017

June 7, 2019

The percentage of adults aged 18 years or older who had lost all of their upper and lower natural teeth decreased from 9.3% in 2000 to 7.0% in 2017, and this pattern was consistent in each age group shown.

Complete tooth loss declined from 2.9% to 2.3% among adults aged 18–44 years, from 10.1% to 6.5% among adults aged 45–64 years, from 25.6% to 14.2% among adults aged 65–74 years, and from 34% to 24.9% among adults aged 75 years or older.

SOURCE: Summary Health Statistics for U.S. Adults: National Health Interview Survey, 2000. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/series/sr_10/sr10_215.pdfpdf icon. Tables of Summary Health Statistics, 2017. https://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2017_SHS_Table_A-6.pdfpdf icon.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6822a5.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Reporting Diabetic Retinopathy Among Those with Prediabetes or Diagnosed Diabetes by Age Group

May 31, 2019

During 2016–2017, adults aged 18–64 years with type 1 diabetes were more likely to have ever had diabetic retinopathy than adults with type 2 diabetes (23.8% compared with 5%).

Adults aged 65 years or older with type 1 diabetes were also more likely to have ever had diabetic retinopathy than adults with type 2 diabetes (24.6% compared with 8.7%).

For both age groups, among those with prediabetes, the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was 0.6%.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2016–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.


Quickstats: Rates of Injury from Sports, Recreation, and Leisure Activities Among Children and Adolescents Aged 1–17 Years, by Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2015–2017

May 24, 2019

In 2015–2017, the rate of sports, recreation, and leisure injuries among children and adolescents aged 1–17 years was 82.9 per 1,000 population.

The rate of sports, recreation, and leisure injuries increased with age from 48.4 for those aged 1–4 years, to 72.7 for those aged 5–11 years, and to 117.1 for those aged 12–17 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6820a6.htm