Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Adults Aged 18−26, 2013−2018

January 7, 2020

A new NCHS report describes trends in self-reported HPV vaccination initiation and completion by selected demographic characteristics among adults aged 18−26.

  • Among adults aged 18−26, the percentage who ever received one or more doses of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine increased from 22.1% in 2013 to 39.9% in 2018.
  • The percentage of adults aged 18−26 who received the recommended number of doses of HPV vaccine increased from 13.8% in 2013 to 21.5% in 2018.
  • In 2018, non-Hispanic white adults were more likely than Hispanic adults to have ever received one or more doses of HPV vaccine.
  • Among adults aged 18−26 who ever received one or more doses of HPV vaccine, the majority received the first dose between the ages of 13 and 17 years.

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Had Lower Back Pain in the Past 3 Months, by Sex and Age Group

January 3, 2020

In 2018, 28.0% of men and 31.6% of women aged 18 years or older had lower back pain in the past 3 months.

The percentage of women who had lower back pain increased as age increased.

Among men, the percentage increased with age through age 74 years and then decreased.

Women in the age groups 18–44, 45–64, and 75 years or older were more likely to have lower back pain in the past 3 months than were men in the same age groups, but percentages were similar between men and women in the age group 65–74 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Took Medication To Help Fall or Stay Asleep Four or More Times in the Past Week, by Sex and Age Group

December 13, 2019

During 2017–2018, 8.2% of adults aged 18 years or older took medication to help fall or stay asleep four or more times in the past week (6.6% for men and 9.7% for women).

Among men, the percentage who took medication for sleep four or more times in the past week increased with age from 3.8% among those aged 18–44 years to 10.7% among those aged 65 years or older.

Among women, the percentage increased from 5.8% for those aged 18–44 years to 12.7% among those aged 45–64 years and 13.2% among those aged 65 years older.

Across all age groups, the percentage was higher among women than men.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2017 and 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6849a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Had Seen or Talked to a Health Care Professional in the Past 12 Months by Race/Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, 2012–2013 and 2017–2018

December 6, 2019

The percentage of adults aged 18–64 years who had seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months increased from 79.3% in 2012–2013 to 82.1% in 2017–2018.

There was an increase in the percentage of Hispanic (67.0% to 73.6%), non-Hispanic white (82.8% to 84.9%), non-Hispanic black (80.0% to 83.2%), and non-Hispanic Asian (75.8% to 78.8%) adults who had seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months between those two periods.

During 2012–2013 as well as 2017–2018, non-Hispanic white adults were the most likely and Hispanic adults were the least likely to have seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2012, 2013, 2017, and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6848a3.htm


Vision testing among children aged 3-5 years in the United States, 2016-2017

November 20, 2019

Questions for Lindsey Black, M.P.H., Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Vision testing among children aged 3-5 years in the United States, 2016-2017

Q: Why did you decide to focus on vision testing for children aged 3-5?

LB: Over a quarter of all children aged 0-17 years have vision problems (1). Two common eye problems, amblyopia (lazy eye) and strabismus (crossed eyes) can be treated and prevent further vision problems if they are found early (2). The USPSTF recommends children between 3-5 years old have vision screening (3) and Healthy People 2020 target for vision screening is 44.1% of preschool aged children (1). Despite this, little is known about the current prevalence of vision screening and how this may differ by population subgroups. We focused on children 3-5 years old as they are the focus of the USPSTF recommendations.

  1. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020. Washington, DC. Accessed at : https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/vision/objectives
  2. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Get your child’s vision checked. Washington DC. Accessed at: https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/doctor-visits/screening-tests/get-your-childs-vision-checked
  3. US Preventive Services Task Force. Vision Screening for Children 1 to 5 Years of Age: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Pediatrics 127, 2 p340

Q: How did the data vary by age, race and health insurance?

LB: Overall, as children aged, they were more likely to have ever had their vision tested. Additionally, as children aged, they were also more likely to have had their vision tested in the past 12 months. There was also variation by race and Hispanic origin. About 65% of Non-Hispanic white children, 63% of non-Hispanic black children and 59% of Hispanic children have ever had their vision tested. Children with private health insurance (66.7%) were most likely to have ever had their vision tested compared with children with public insurance (61.2%) and children who are uninsured (43.3%).


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

LB: It was surprising how much of an impact a recent well-child visit had on ever having a vision test. Children who did not receive a well-child visit in the past 12 months (44.1%) were less likely to have ever had their vision tested when compared to children that had received a well-child visit in the past 12 months (65.9%). Since vision screenings are recommended to be part of well-child visits, these visits provide valuable opportunities to detect problems and offer intervention efforts.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

LB: Data are from the pooled 2016-2017 National Health Interview Survey and can be accessed via: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm. Questions on vision testing are from supplement questions, which focused on expanded content related to child vision. This supplement was asked most recently in 2016-2017.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

LB: Approximately 64% of children aged 3-5 have ever had their vision tested by a doctor or other health professional. As children age, they are more likely to have had their vision tested. Disparities exist by race, and health insurance status. Receipt of a recent well-child visit was also associated with a higher prevalence of receiving a vision test.

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 25 Years or Older Who Had Seen a Health Care Professional in the Past 12 Months and Who Easily Understood Information from Their Health Care Providers Most or All of the Time by Sex and Education Level

November 15, 2019

In 2017, 91.6% of adults aged 25 years or older easily understood information from their health care providers most or all of the time.

The percentage of adults who easily understood health care information most or all of the time increased as education level increased.

Adults who had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher were the most likely to understand their health care providers at least most of the time (93.9%), whereas those without a high school diploma were the least likely (85.2%).

Men (91.0%) were somewhat less likely than women (92.1%) to have easily understood information from providers most or all of the time.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6845a6.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Did Not Take Their Medication as Prescribed or Asked for Lower-Cost Medication to Save Money Among Those Prescribed Medication in the Past 12 Months by Number of Chronic Conditions

November 1, 2019

In 2018, among adults aged 18 years or older who were prescribed medication in the past 12 months, the percentage who did not take their medication as prescribed to save money increased with the number of reported chronic conditions, from 6.2% with no chronic conditions to 9.1% with 1–2 chronic conditions and 14.0% with more than 3 chronic conditions.

The percentage who asked their doctor for a lower-cost medication also increased with the number of reported chronic conditions from 15.1% among those with no chronic conditions to 18.4% among those with 1–2 chronic conditions and 27.4% among those with more than 3 chronic conditions.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6843a6.htm