Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2019

May 28, 2020

Questions for Robin Cohen, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2019.”

Has the percentage of people without health insurance changed much in recent years?

RC: This most recent release from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) includes estimates for January through June 2019. In 2019, the NHIS questionnaire was redesigned to better meet the needs of data users. Due to changes in weighting and design methodology, direct comparisons between estimates for 2019 and earlier years should be made with caution, as the impact of these changes has not been fully evaluated at this time. A working paper entitled, “Preliminary Evaluation of the Impact of the 2019 National Health Interview Survey Questionnaire Redesign and Weighting Adjustments on Early Release Program Estimates” discusses both these issues in greater detail.


Q: Why did NCHS redesign the NHIS?

RC: In 2019, the NHIS questionnaire was redesigned to better meet the needs of data users. The redesign aimed to improve measurement of covered health topics, reduce respondent burden by shortening the length of the questionnaire, harmonize overlapping content with other federal surveys, establish a long-term structure of ongoing and periodic topics and incorporate advances in survey methodology and measurement.


Q: Has the NHIS ever been redesigned before?

RC: The NHIS has undergone several questionnaire redesigns since its inception in 1957. The last major questionnaire redesign occurred in 1997.


Q: How was the health insurance data strengthened by this redesign?

RC: The flow and content of the health insurance questions in the redesign are similar to those from 1997-2018. The main difference is that instead of a family respondent providing health insurance information for all family members as a proxy, health insurance is now asked directly of the sample adult and the parent or guardian of the sample child.


Q: Do we have a sense of how COVID-19 has impacted health insurance coverage in the U.S.?

RC: The estimates from this report are based on data collected from January through June 2019. This is prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. There are some estimates of health insurance coverage during the COVID-19 pandemic available from the Household Pulse Survey (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/covid19/pulse/health-insurance-coverage.htm). The Household Pulse Survey is a 20-minute survey on how the COVID-19 pandemic may impact households across the country. However, these estimates of health insurance coverage may not be comparable with those using NHIS data. 


Q: When will NHIS have data on the impact of COVID-19 on health insurance coverage?

RC: Data collection from the 2020 NHIS is ongoing, and the early release of estimates from the 2020 NHIS has not been determined.


Q: Is the uninsured # for kids higher than previously reported?

RC: This most recent release from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) includes estimates for January through June 2019. In 2019, the NHIS questionnaire was redesigned to better meet the needs of data users. Due to changes in weighting and design methodology, direct comparisons between estimates for 2019 and earlier years should be made with caution, as the impact of these changes has not been fully evaluated at this time.


Q: Anything else of note in your report that you’d like to mention?

RC: In January 2019, the National Health Interview Survey launched a redesigned questionnaire. The new design collects health insurance information from one randomly selected adult and child from each household in the survey. Estimates in this report are based on the first two quarters of 2019.


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Disability by Diagnosed Diabetes Status and Age Group

May 22, 2020

In 2018, among adults aged 18 years or older, those ever receiving a diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to have disability than those never receiving a diagnosis of diabetes (27.1% versus 8.1%).

This pattern was consistent among adults aged 18–44 (16.3% versus 4.4%), 45–64 (24.5% versus 8.1%), and 65 years or older (33.3% versus 18.5%).

Regardless of diabetes status, the percentage of adults with disability increased with age.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6920a5.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Who Have Difficulty Seeing Even When Wearing Glasses by Poverty Status

May 8, 2020

In 2018, 14.9% of adults aged 18 years or older had some difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses, and 1.6% had a lot of difficulty or could not see at all.

The percentage of adults who had some difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses decreased as income increased, from 19.3% among those with income below the poverty threshold to 11.3% among those with income more than 400% of the poverty threshold.

The percentage of adults who had a lot of difficulty or could not see at all also decreased as income increased, from 4.2% among those with income below the poverty threshold to 0.8% among those with income more than 400% of the poverty threshold.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.


Electronic Cigarette Use Among U.S. Adults, 2018

April 30, 2020

A new NCHS report examines e-cigarette use among U.S. adults aged 18 and over by selected sociodemographic characteristics and in relation to cigarette smoking status.

Click to access db365-h.pdf

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Reported an Average of 6 Hours of Sleep or less per 24-Hour Period, by Employment Category

April 24, 2020

The percentage of employed adults who reported an average of 6 hours or less of sleep per 24-hour period increased from 28.4% during 2008–2009 to 32.6% during 2017–2018.

During this period, increases were noted among private sector employees (29.5% to 33.3%), government employees (28.8% to 32.8%), and the self-employed (24.3% to 31.4%).

A lower percentage of the self- employed reported 6 hours or less of sleep compared with private sector and government employees during 2008–2009.

The smaller differences by employment categories noted during 2017–2018 were not statistically significant.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2008–2009 and 2017–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6916a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Persons Who Had a Cold in the Past 2 Weeks, by Age Group and Calendar Quarter — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2018

April 10, 2020

In 2018, the percentage of persons of all ages who had a cold during the past 2 weeks was 16.6% in January–March, 8.5% in April–June, 7.0% in July–September, and 13.7% in October–December.

Across all calendar quarters, colds were more common in younger persons than in older persons.

A higher percentage of persons in each age group had colds in the past 2 weeks in January–March and October–December than had colds in April–June or July–September 2018.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6914a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Who Had a Severe Headache or Migraine in the Past 3 Months, by Sex and Age Group

March 27, 2020

In 2018, women were nearly twice as likely as men to have had a severe headache or migraine in the past 3 months (20.1% versus 10.6%), both overall and within each age group.

The percentage of persons experiencing severe headache or migraine declined with age for both men and women, from 25.5% among those aged 18–44 years to 7.6% among those aged 75 years or older for women and from 12.3% among those aged 18–44 years to 4.0% among those aged 75 years or older for men.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912a8.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Met Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening Recommendations — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2018

March 20, 2020

March is Colorectal Awareness Month. 67% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years met the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Most persons (60.6%) had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years. Cancer screening leads to early detection, and early detection saves lives.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6911a7.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Adolescents Aged 4–17 Years with Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties by Sex and Urbanization Level

March 13, 2020

During 2016–2018, the percentage of children and adolescents aged 4–17 years with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties was higher among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (6.7%) than among those living in metropolitan areas (5.3%).

Among boys, those living in nonmetropolitan areas (8.5%) were more likely to have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties than those living in metropolitan areas (6.6%), but the difference among girls was smaller and not significant.

Among children and adolescents living in either metropolitan or nonmetropolitan areas, boys were more likely than girls to have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2016–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6910a6.htm


Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disabilities Among U.S. Children Aged 3–17 Years

March 4, 2020

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities are the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders in children and often coexist.

Previous research has suggested that the prevalence of these conditions may differ by race and Hispanic origin.

Using timely, nationally representative data, this report examines the reported prevalence of ADHD and learning disabilities by race and ethnicity and select demographic characteristics that are associated with the diagnosis of these conditions.

Findings: 

  • In 2016–2018, nearly 14% of children aged 3–17 years were reported as ever having been diagnosed with either attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or a learning disability; non-Hispanic black children were the most likely to be diagnosed (16.9%).
  • Among children aged 3–10 years, non-Hispanic black children were more likely to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD or a learning disability compared with non-Hispanic white or Hispanic children.
  • Diagnosis of ADHD or a learning disability differed by federal poverty level for children in all racial and ethnic groups.
  • Diagnosis of ADHD or a learning disability differed by parental education among non-Hispanic white children only.