QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Reported an Average of 6 Hours of Sleep or less per 24-Hour Period, by Employment Category

April 24, 2020

The percentage of employed adults who reported an average of 6 hours or less of sleep per 24-hour period increased from 28.4% during 2008–2009 to 32.6% during 2017–2018.

During this period, increases were noted among private sector employees (29.5% to 33.3%), government employees (28.8% to 32.8%), and the self-employed (24.3% to 31.4%).

A lower percentage of the self- employed reported 6 hours or less of sleep compared with private sector and government employees during 2008–2009.

The smaller differences by employment categories noted during 2017–2018 were not statistically significant.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2008–2009 and 2017–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6916a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Persons Who Had a Cold in the Past 2 Weeks, by Age Group and Calendar Quarter — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2018

April 10, 2020

In 2018, the percentage of persons of all ages who had a cold during the past 2 weeks was 16.6% in January–March, 8.5% in April–June, 7.0% in July–September, and 13.7% in October–December.

Across all calendar quarters, colds were more common in younger persons than in older persons.

A higher percentage of persons in each age group had colds in the past 2 weeks in January–March and October–December than had colds in April–June or July–September 2018.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6914a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Who Had a Severe Headache or Migraine in the Past 3 Months, by Sex and Age Group

March 27, 2020

In 2018, women were nearly twice as likely as men to have had a severe headache or migraine in the past 3 months (20.1% versus 10.6%), both overall and within each age group.

The percentage of persons experiencing severe headache or migraine declined with age for both men and women, from 25.5% among those aged 18–44 years to 7.6% among those aged 75 years or older for women and from 12.3% among those aged 18–44 years to 4.0% among those aged 75 years or older for men.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912a8.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Met Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening Recommendations — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2018

March 20, 2020

March is Colorectal Awareness Month. 67% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years met the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for colorectal cancer screening. Most persons (60.6%) had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years. Cancer screening leads to early detection, and early detection saves lives.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6911a7.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Adolescents Aged 4–17 Years with Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties by Sex and Urbanization Level

March 13, 2020

During 2016–2018, the percentage of children and adolescents aged 4–17 years with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties was higher among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (6.7%) than among those living in metropolitan areas (5.3%).

Among boys, those living in nonmetropolitan areas (8.5%) were more likely to have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties than those living in metropolitan areas (6.6%), but the difference among girls was smaller and not significant.

Among children and adolescents living in either metropolitan or nonmetropolitan areas, boys were more likely than girls to have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2016–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6910a6.htm


Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Prevalence of Attention-deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Learning Disabilities Among U.S. Children Aged 3–17 Years

March 4, 2020

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and learning disabilities are the most commonly diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorders in children and often coexist.

Previous research has suggested that the prevalence of these conditions may differ by race and Hispanic origin.

Using timely, nationally representative data, this report examines the reported prevalence of ADHD and learning disabilities by race and ethnicity and select demographic characteristics that are associated with the diagnosis of these conditions.

Findings: 

  • In 2016–2018, nearly 14% of children aged 3–17 years were reported as ever having been diagnosed with either attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or a learning disability; non-Hispanic black children were the most likely to be diagnosed (16.9%).
  • Among children aged 3–10 years, non-Hispanic black children were more likely to have ever been diagnosed with ADHD or a learning disability compared with non-Hispanic white or Hispanic children.
  • Diagnosis of ADHD or a learning disability differed by federal poverty level for children in all racial and ethnic groups.
  • Diagnosis of ADHD or a learning disability differed by parental education among non-Hispanic white children only.

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 25 Years or Older Who Saw a Dentist in the Past Year by Education Level and Sex

February 21, 2020

In 2018, among adults aged 25 years or older, women (69.4%) were more likely than men (61.2%) to have seen a dentist in the past year.

The percentage of men and women who saw a dentist in the past year increased as education level increased. Among women, those with a Bachelor’s degree or higher were the most likely to have seen a dentist in the past year (82.5%) and those with less than a high school education were least likely (51.4%).

Among men, the same pattern prevailed (74.6% compared with 41.9%).

Within each education group, the percentage of women who saw a dentist in the past year was higher than the percentage of men.


Prevalence of Children Aged 3–17 Years With Developmental Disabilities, by Urbanicity: United States, 2015–2018

February 19, 2020

Questions for Ben Zablotsky, Ph.D., Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Prevalence of Children Aged 3–17 Years With Developmental Disabilities, by Urbanicity: United States, 2015–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to focus on urbanicity among children with developmental disabilities?

BZ: Thanks to previous research, we know that children with developmental disabilities typically require more health care and educational services than their typically developing peers, and we also know that children living in rural areas have greater unmet medical needs when compared to children living in urban areas.  For these two reasons, it is possible, that children with developmental disabilities living in rural areas could represent some of the most vulnerable when it comes to receiving a variety of health care services.  This report attempts to answer this question, by exploring the prevalence of selected developmental disability conditions and use of related services in rural and urban areas.  It serves as a follow-up to a previous Pediatrics article written by myself and Lindsey Black, along with colleagues from the National Center for Health Statistics, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, titled “Prevalence and Trends of Developmental Disabilities among Children in the United States: 2009-2017


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report and what is considered a developmental disability?

BZ: Data come from the 2015-2018 National Health Interview Survey, a timely and nationally representative survey.  Developmental disabilities examined in this report were attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder, blindness, cerebral palsy, moderate to profound hearing loss, learning disability, intellectual disability, seizures in the past 12 months, stuttering or stammering in the past 12 months, or any other developmental delay. Children whose parents answered that their child had one or more of these conditions were classified as having any “developmental disability.”


Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by types of developmental disabilities and service utilization in rural and urban areas?

BZ: During 2015-2018, children were more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD and cerebral palsy in rural areas than urban areas.  Meanwhile, children with developmental disabilities living in rural areas were less likely to have seen a mental health professional, therapist, or had a well-child check-up in the past 12 months than their urban peers.  Children with developmental disabilities in rural areas were also less likely to be receiving Special Education or Early Intervention Services.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you?

BZ: Children with developmental disabilities often need specialty and mental health services.  It was surprising to see that approximately half of children with developmental disabilities living in rural areas had not seen a mental health professional, specialist, or therapist in the past year.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

BZ: There was a higher prevalence of children with developmental disabilities in rural areas compared with urban areas. Furthermore, among children with developmental disabilities, those living in rural areas were less likely to use a range of health care and educational services compared with their urban peers.  Additional research exploring the pathways to the diagnosis and treatment of developmental disabilities in both urban and rural areas, with a focus on the availability of resources to pay for services as well as access to trained specialty providers, could provide insight into the disparities seen in this report.


Problems Paying Medical Bills, 2018

February 12, 2020

Questions for Amy Cha, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Problems Paying Medical Bills, 2018,”

Q: What was the significance of studying persons in families having problems paying medical bills?

AC: Previously published data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) found that in 2017 one in seven persons under age 65 was in a family having problems paying medical bills. Persons who are in families with problems paying medical bills may also experience serious financial consequences, such as difficulties paying for food and housing, or filing for bankruptcy.


Q: How did the data vary by gender, race and age groups?

AC: The percentage of persons who were in families having problems paying medical bills was higher among females, children aged 0-17 years, and non-Hispanic blacks than among males, adults, and other racial and ethnic groups, respectively.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you?

AC: We were surprised that almost 30% of uninsured children and 27% of uninsured adults (aged 18-64) were in families having problems paying medical bills.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AC: The data for this report came from the 2011-2018 NHIS, a nationally representative, household survey of the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population. NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics. Most interviews are conducted in person in respondent’s homes.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AC: The percentages of persons who were in families having problems paying medical bills varied by health insurance type. Among persons under age 65, those who were uninsured were more likely that those with Medicaid or private coverage to have problems paying medical bills, and among adults aged 65 and over, those with Medicare and Medicaid, and Medicare only were more likely than those with Medicare Advantage or private coverage to have problems paying medical bills.


QuickStats: Percentage of Persons Who Had a Stomach or Intestinal Illness That Started in the Past 2 Weeks by Sex and Age Group

January 31, 2020

In 2018, 4.7% of males and 5.3% of females had a stomach illness that started in the past 2 weeks.

Among children and adolescents aged 0–17 years, no difference was observed in the percentage of males and females who had a stomach illness that started in the past 2 weeks. However, among adults, women were more likely to have had a stomach illness than men.

This held for those aged 18–64 years (5.3% of women compared with 4.5% of men) and those aged 65 years or older (5.8% versus 4.2%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6904a8.htm