QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Adolescents Aged 5–17 Years Who Reported Being Tired Most Days or Every Day, by Age Group and Hours of Screen Time

February 11, 2022

In 2020, 3.5% of children aged 5–11 years and 10.9% of adolescents aged 12–17 years reported being tired on most days or every day.

Among adolescents aged 12–17, the percentage reporting being tired was higher (12.0%) for those who reported >2 hours of screen time (in addition to that for schoolwork) per weekday than for those who reported ≤2 hours of screen time each day (6.5%). In children aged 5–11 years, the percentage reporting being tired did not differ by hours of screen time (3.6% for >2 hours versus 3.5% for ≤2 hours).

Regardless of the amount of screen time reported, adolescents aged 12–17 years were more likely to report being tired on most days or every day than were children aged 5–11 years.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7106a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥18 Years with Diagnosed Diabetes, by Disability Status and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2020

January 28, 2022

In 2020, 25.7% of adults aged ≥18 years with disability had diagnosed diabetes compared with 7.7% of those without disability.

For each age group, those with disability were more likely to have diabetes: adults aged 18–44 years (8.3% versus 2.2%), 45–64 years (25.3% versus 9.9%), and ≥65 years (34.2% versus 17.8%).

Regardless of disability status, the percentage of adults with diagnosed diabetes increased with age.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7104a6.htm


Stressful Life Events Among Children Aged 5–17 Years by Disability Status: United States, 2019

January 26, 2022

Questions for Heidi Ullman, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Stressful Life Events Among Children Aged 5–17 Years by Disability Status: United States, 2019.”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on stressful life events for children with a disability?

HU: Children with disabilities are an important population group that has experienced disadvantage in many domains.  We were interested in seeing if children with disabilities were at increased risk of experiencing stressful life events as these events have been linked to adverse physical and mental health outcomes.  Identifying the extent to which children with disabilities are at increased risk will inform policy to support these children and promote their health and full inclusion in society.


Q: What is considered a disability for this report?

HU: We adopt a functional approach to disability consistent with international standards for disability measurement. Disability in children aged 5-17 years is defined by the reported level of difficulty (no difficulty, some difficulty, a lot of difficulty, or cannot do at all/unable to do) in thirteen core functioning domains: seeing, hearing, mobility, self-care, communication, learning, remembering, concentrating, accepting change, controlling behavior, making friends, anxiety and depression. Children reported to have “a lot of difficulty” or “cannot do at all” to at least one domain of functioning or with “daily” anxiety or depression are considered to have disability.


Q: Can you describe what the four stressful life events that are examined in the report?

HU: Four stressful life events are considered: 1) ever been the victim of, or witnessed, violence in the neighborhood, 2) ever lived with a parent or guardian who served time in jail or prison (after the child was born), 3) ever lived with someone who was mentally ill or severely depressed, and 4) ever lived with someone who had a problem with alcohol or drugs. It should be noted that these four stressful life events represent a subset of a larger set called Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).


Q: How does the data vary by disability status when looking at the four stressful life events examined in this report?

HU: Among children aged 5-17 years, those with a disability were more likely than those without a disability to have experienced each of the four stressful life events examined in this report. The differences by disability status were greatest  for violence exposure in the neighborhood and having lived with someone who was mentally ill or severely depressed. Moreover, disability status was associated with experiencing multiple stressful life events in children.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

HU: The take home message is that children with a disability are more vulnerable to experiencing stressful life events, the impacts of which may curtail their full participation and inclusion in society. More generally, our results point to the importance of considering disability status when analyzing health disparities.


QuickStats: Percentage of Children Aged 2–17 Years With >2 Hours of Screen Time Per Weekday, by Sex and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2020

January 21, 2022

Overall, 65.7% of boys and 64.6% of girls aged 2–17 years spent >2 hours of screen time per weekday, in addition to screen time spent for schoolwork.

Among both boys and girls, the percentage of children who spent >2 hours of screen time increased with increasing age group from 47.5% for those aged 2–5 years to 80.2% for those aged 12–17 years.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7103a6.htm


New NCHS Reports Released This Week

January 21, 2022

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥18 Years Who Received Care at Home From a Friend or Family Member in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Age Group

January 14, 2022

During July–December 2020, 10.0% of adults aged ≥18 years received care at home from a friend or family member in the past 12 months.

Among both men and women, the percentage of adults who received care in the past 12 months increased with age.

Women were more likely than men to receive care among those aged ≥18 years (11.5% and 8.5%, respectively), 45–64 years (12.4% and 8.5%, respectively), and ≥65 years (17.7% and 13.2%, respectively).

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7102a5.htm


QUICKSTAT: Percentage of Employed Adults Who Needed to Work Closer Than 6 Feet from Other Persons All or Most of the Time at Their Main Job by Occupation

December 10, 2021

During July–December 2020, 30.7% of all currently employed workers needed to work closer than 6 ft (2 m) from other persons at their job all or most of the time.

The four occupations with the highest percentages were health care practitioners and technicians (70.5%), health care support (69.7%), food preparation and serving (58.9%), and personal care and service (57.8%) occupations.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/2020nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7049a7.htm


Q & A with Author: Dental Care Utilization Among Children Aged 1–17 Years: United States, 2019 and 2020

December 2, 2021

Questions for Dzifa Adjaye-Gbewonyo, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Dental Care Utilization Among Children Aged 1–17 Years: United States, 2019 and 2020.”

Q: Why did you decide to look at children’s dental examinations and cleanings during the pandemic?

DAG: We know that the COVID-19 pandemic required dental providers to make changes to their services, and this affected access to dental care. There have also not been many recent estimates from National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data on preventive dental care in children, especially covering such a broad age range. So, looking at child dental care and how it changed between 2019 and 2020 was a priority research topic for the Division of Health Interview Statistics, which is responsible for the NHIS.

Q: How did the data vary by age groups, income level and region?

DAG: By age group, children aged 1-4 years had the lowest rate of dental examinations and cleanings in the past 12 months in both 2019 and 2020. They also experienced the largest decrease between the two years, from almost 59% to 51%. This contrasts with older children where the percentage ranged between 88% and 92% across age groups for the two years. By income level, fewer children living in families with lower incomes had a dental examination or cleaning in 2020 compared to 2019, while there was no significant difference between 2019 and 2020 for children with family incomes of at least 400% of the federal poverty level. Regional estimates showed that annual preventive dental visits were highest in the West and Northeast in 2019 and remained high in the West in 2020 but decreased significantly in the Northeast and in the South.

Q: What is the main takeaway message here?

DAG: I think the big takeaway is that overall, fewer children in the U.S. had an annual dental examination or cleaning in 2020 than in 2019, but the change was not the same in all segments of the child population. Some subpopulations were affected more than others, especially young children, children from lower income families, and children living in the Northeast and South. It is also important to note that we can’t fully attribute the changes to the COVID-19 pandemic because the data refer to preventive dental care in the past 12 months. So, some of this time frame took place before the pandemic.

Q: Do you plan to have adult data available for the same years?

DAG: Yes, adult data on dental care were collected and are available for 2019 and 2020. Some estimates of these data are already accessible on the NHIS website, including a data brief on urban-rural differences in dental care in 2019 and interactive quarterly and biannual estimates released through the NHIS Early Release Program. Additional analyses are also planned.

Q: Do you think the downward trend will continue into 2021?

DAG: It’s difficult to say what the trend will be in 2021 since a number of conditions have changed. Though the dental care questions rotated off the NHIS in 2021, they will return in 2022 so it will be possible to look at these data again in future years.


Concussions and Brain Injuries in Children: United States, 2020

December 1, 2021

A new NCHS report presents national estimates of lifetime symptomatology and health care professional diagnoses of concussions or brain injuries as reported by a knowledgeable adult, usually a parent, in children aged 0–17 years using data from the 2020 National Health Interview Survey.

Key Findings:

  • In 2020, 6.8% of children aged 17 years and under had ever had symptoms of a concussion or brain injury.
  • Non-Hispanic White children were more likely than children of other race and Hispanic-origin groups to have ever had symptoms of a concussion or brain injury.
  • The percentage of children aged 17 years and under who had ever had a diagnosis of a concussion or brain injury by a health care provider was 3.9%.
  • Compared with their peers, boys (4.7%) and non-Hispanic White children (5.2%) were more likely to have ever had a diagnosis of a concussion or brain injury.

NCHS Releases Latest NHIS Early Release Data

November 16, 2021

The Early Release (ER) Program of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) provides estimates, analytic reports, and preliminary microdata files on an expedited schedule. NHIS data users can have access to these very timely estimates, reports, and microdata files without having to wait for the release of the final annual NHIS microdata files by selected demographic characteristics.

One of the ER reports presents estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the January through June 2021 National Health Interview Survey.

The ER program released preliminary estimates of the percentages of adults and children living in homes with only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones). These estimates are the most up-to-date estimates available from the federal government concerning the size and characteristics of this population.

ER also released quarterly and biannual health estimates on a variety of conditions.  The data is available on interactive web dashboards at the following links below:

Interactive Quarterly Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January 2019 – June 2021

https://wwwn.cdc.gov/NHISDataQueryTool/ER_Quarterly/index_quarterly.html

Interactive Biannual Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January 2019 – June 2021

https://wwwn.cdc.gov/NHISDataQueryTool/ER_Biannual/index_biannual.html