QuickStats: Percentage Distribution of Heat-Related Deaths by Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2018–2020

June 17, 2022

During 2018–2020, a total of 3,066 heat-related deaths occurred.

The highest percentage of heat-related deaths occurred among persons aged 55–64 years (19%), and the lowest percentage occurred among those aged 5–14 years (1%).

Among those aged 5–14 through aged 55–64 years, the percentage of heat-related deaths increased with age, then decreased through those aged ≥85 years (7%).

Approximately 2% of heat-related deaths occurred among those aged <1 year and 4% among those aged 1–4 years.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Multiple Cause-of-Death Data, 2018–2020. https://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd.html

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7124a6.htm


Update to Provisional Drug Overdose Deaths from 12 months ending in January 2022

June 15, 2022

Provisional data show that the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 12.5% from 12 months ending in January 2022, from 95,440 to 107,375.

The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in January 2022 (80,590) increased from 71,469 in the previous year.

The number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids and psychostimulants with abuse potential continue to increase compared to the previous year.

Drug overdose deaths involving cocaine also increased compared to the previous year.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


QuickStats: Percentage Distribution of Deaths Involving Injuries from Recreational and Nonrecreational Use of Watercraft, by Month — United States, 2018–2020

May 27, 2022

During 2018–2020, 1,508 deaths occurred involving injuries from recreational and nonrecreational use of watercraft.

The percentage of deaths each month ranged from 3.0% in December to 16.6% in July. Most deaths (68.6%) occurred during May–September.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7121a5.htm


Births Rose for the First Time in Seven Years in 2021

May 24, 2022

The number of births in the United States and the general fertility rate increased for the first time in seven years during 2021. The data released today are featured by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The new report, “Births: Provisional Data for 2021,” analyzes data from more than 99% of birth certificates issued during the year. The report shows a 1% increase in births from 2020, with 3,659,289 births recorded in 2021. The general fertility rate in 2021 was 56.6 births per 1,000 women ages 15–44, also up 1% from 2020. In contrast, the number of births and general fertility rate both declined 4% from 2019 to 2020.

Other findings in the new report:

  • Birth rates declined for women in the age groups between 15 and 24 years, rose for women in the age groups between 25 and 49 years, and were unchanged for adolescents aged 10-14 in 2021.
  • The birth rate for teenagers ages 15–19 declined by 6% in 2021 to 14.4 births per 1,000 females.
  • The teen birth rate has declined every year except for two (2006 and 2007) since 1991. The rates declined in 2021 for both younger (ages 15–17) and older (ages 18–19) teenagers.
  • The cesarean delivery rate increased to 32.1% in 2021. The low-risk cesarean delivery rate
    increased to 26.3%.
  • The preterm birth rate rose 4% in 2021 to 10.48%—the highest rate reported since at least 2007

QuickStats: Percentage of Suicides and Homicides Involving a Firearm Among Persons Aged ≥10 Years, by Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2020

May 13, 2022

In 2020, among persons aged ≥10 years, the percentage of suicide deaths that involved a firearm was lowest among those aged 25–44 years (45.1%) and highest among those aged ≥65 years (70.8%).

The percentage of homicide deaths that involved a firearm decreased with age, from 91.6% among those aged 10–24 years to 46.0% among those aged ≥65 years.

Persons aged ≥65 years had the highest percentage of suicide deaths that involved a firearm but the lowest percentage of homicide deaths that involved a firearm.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7119a5.htm


Testicular Cancer Deaths in U.S. from 1999-2020

April 19, 2022
YearDeaths
1999378
2000338
2001335
2002393
2003344
2004357
2005359
2006358
2007326
2008358
2009376
2010399
2011380
2012386
2013383
2014411
2015374
2016431
2017425
2018401
2019458
2020461
TOTAL8,431

Source: CDC WONDER

ICD-10 Codes: C62.0, C62.1, and C62.


QuickStats: Rate of Deaths Attributed to Unintentional Injury from Fire or Flames, by Sex and Urban-Rural Status — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2020

April 8, 2022

In 2020, the death rate attributed to unintentional injury from fire or flames was higher in rural areas than in urban areas for females and males.

The rate for females was 1.4 per 100,000 in rural areas and 0.6 in urban areas.

The rate for males was 2.4 per 100,000 in rural areas and 0.9 in urban areas.

Males had higher death rates than females in both rural and urban areas.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7114a5.htm


Tuberculosis Deaths in U.S. from 1999-2020

March 24, 2022
YearDeathsAge Adjusted Death Rate Per 100,000
19999300.3
20007760.3
20017640.3
20027840.3
20037110.2
20046570.2
20056480.2
20066520.2
20075540.2
20085850.2
20095290.1
20105690.2
20115390.2
20125100.1
20135550.1
20144930.1
20154700.1
20165280.1
20175150.1
20185420.1
20195260.1
20206000.2

Source: CDC WONDER, https://wonder.cdc.gov

ICD-10 Codes: A16-A19 (Tuberculosis)


PODCAST: Alcohol Deaths on the Rise and Suicide Declines

March 18, 2022

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/podcasts/2022/20220318/20220318.htm

HOST:  The month of March is often associated with St. Patrick’s Day, which for some is also an occasion of heavy alcohol use.  NCHS has historically collected data on various health behaviors, including alcohol use, and since the arrival of the pandemic, vital statistics show that there has been a surge in alcohol-induced deaths, an increase from slightly over 39,000 deaths in 2019 to just over 49,000 deaths in 2020 – an increase of more than 25 percent.  Provisional data from 2021 show the number of alcohol-induced deaths have continued to increase, to more than 52,000, up 34 percent from pre-pandemic levels.

Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is another, long-term adverse consequence of alcohol abuse, and those deaths have increased during the pandemic as well, from over 44,000 deaths in 2019 to over 56,000 deaths in 2021 – an increase of more than 26 percent.  Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis became the 9th leading cause of death of all Americans in 2021, up from 11th prior to the pandemic.

Drug abuse of course is a well-documented scourge in the country, and in March, NCHS released the latest monthly provisional tally of overdose deaths in the U.S., for the one-year period ending in October 2021.  105,752 people died of drug overdoses during this stretch.  Synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl, accounted for the largest proportion of overdose deaths.

On March 17, NCHS released its latest estimates on emergency department visits in the United States from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, documenting that more than 151 million ER visits occurred in the U.S. during 2019.

Earlier in the month, NCHS released a new studypdf icon looking at births during the pandemic.  The new report shows that the decline in births appears to have slowed during the first half of 2021, compared to the second half of 2020.  The decline in births during the first half of 2021 would have been even smaller except for a large drop during the month of January.

Finally, NCHS released the latest official trend report on suicide in America.  The latest trends were presented in November in a separate report, and we talked with the author of that report, Sally Curtin, about the latest numbers:

HOST: Despite other causes of death such as drug overdoses and homicides spiking during the pandemic, your data show suicide actually declined, correct?

SALLY CURTIN: Yes that is correct. The number, just under 46,000 in 2020, was 3% lower than in 2019 and also the rate of suicide per 100,000 population was 3% lower as well.  Now, this is actually building on a decline which actually had started before COVID.  There was the first decline in almost 20 years from 2018 to 2019 in suicide – of about 2% – and that’s after an almost steady increase in suicide between about the year 2000 and 2018… it had increased by 35% during that time

HOST: Was it a surprise that suicide dropped in 2020, particularly given the historic increases in homicide and drug overdose deaths?

SALLY CURTIN: That’s a good question because we do know – there’s documented evidence – that some risk factors for suicide definitely increased during 2020.  And some of those risk factors are mental health issues such as depression, anxiety… Also, substance abuse increased during 2020 as well as job and financial stress.  And those are known risk factors for suicide.  So, people were concerned that the actual suicide deaths would increase.  But in the very first sentence of our report we say that suicide is complex and it’s a multi-faceted public health issue.  So it’s not as easy to say, “OK, these risk factors went up for this cause of death; therefore, you know, the deaths are going to go up.”  Suicide is much more complex than that.  There are, as well as risk factors there are elements of, obviously, prevention as well as intervention.  So some of those factors – prevention and intervention – were definitely going on during 2020, and so therefore it’s hard to say and I think in general suicide is just harder to predict than a lot of other causes of death.

HOST: So then would you say that (with) the fact that suicide declined two years in a row, is this officially a new trend?

SALLY CURTIN: It’s hard to say.  I mean, certainly it’s positive in that it’s not continuing to trend upward as it had been for so many years.  But also let me point out it still is historically high – the number is historically high as well as the rate.  They’re both high over the last 20 years.  They’re just a little bit lower than the peak in 2018.  But certainly having two years of declines gives you some hope that it might continue.

HOST: Your new study looked at suicide during 2020 on a monthly basis – what were some things that stood out in your analysis?

SALLY CURTIN: For the most part, in early 2020 – in January and February – the numbers were higher than in 2019.  But starting in March they went lower, and pretty much suicide numbers in 2020 were lower than in 2019 for the rest of the year, except in the month of November where they were just slightly higher.  Now what really stood out is the month of April, where the suicide number in 2020 was 14% lower than in 2019, and that was the greatest percentage difference of any month. And we typically don’t see that big of a change year over year in monthly numbers, so that stood out.  And also it changed sort of the yearly pattern of suicides in general – the month that has the lowest number tends to be in the winter or maybe late Fall but in 2020, April was the month with the lowest number

HOST: That is interesting – would you say that it’s counter-intuitive given that everyone was in lockdown and a lot of people weren’t working etc?

SALLY CURTIN: You would think so and we definitely heard that calls to suicide hotlines just, they just blew up and one study said they went up 800%.  So we do know that people were stressed, but we also know that they were reaching out a lot and so… yeah it is (a surprise) – I think most people will be surprised there was that large drop in April.  And I’ll leave it to others to really sort of explain what was going on – you know, whether everyone was just sort of in shock or if the stigma of maybe reaching out wasn’t quite what it normally is during regular times.

HOST: It looks like the data suggest that the declines were pretty much across the board.  Is that correct?

SALLY CURTIN: Well, for females that’s pretty much correct.  And I mean by race and ethnicity groups – all of the groups for females were lower in 2020 than 2019.  And the greatest percent decline was for Non-Hispanic white females.  There was actually a drop of 10%, and that decline reached statistical significance.  But even for females the declines really started at age 35 and over. For the younger females ages 10 to 34, rates were either the same or actually increased a bit.  For males, there was a mixed picture.  Non-Hispanic white males, as well as Non-Hispanic Asian males, had a decline but groups of minority males had increases.  Non-Hispanic black men had an increase in their rates… Hispanic men… as well as Non-Hispanic American Indian men… And once again, for men, the groups for which there was a decline tended to be in middle-age or older ages, starting with age 35.  It was not apparent in the young people ages 10 to 34.

HOST: The increases among Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic and any other minority group – had these increases been happening prior to 2020 as well?

SALLY CURTIN: Yes, pretty much all of these groups that saw those increases from 2019 and 2020 had been trending upward.  The difference is for white and Asian, they had also been trending upward but now they’ve turned.  So yes, it was just a continuation of a generally upward trend.

HOST: Do you have any indications that the decline in suicide is continuing in 2021?

SALLY CURTIN: So far we do not have any provisional data for 2021 and something that is brought out in the report is that we don’t typically do suicide reports with provisional data because unlike other causes of death it can take longer to get an accurate cause of death saying that it’s suicide.  An example is in the context of a drug overdose.  Often, they have to do toxicology analysis to figure out if the intent was actually suicidal or if it was just accidental.  So for that reason suicide figures tend to lag behind other causes of death and unfortunately right now we don’t have any numbers at all for 2021.

HOST: OK, well any other points to add?

SALLY CURTIN: I think just you know that the overall decline – it’s probably unexpected or for a lot of people because there were known increases in risk factors.  But to just point out once again that although there was an overall decline, this was a lot driven by what happened with the majority group, with Non-Hispanic whites who have among the highest rates and the numbers of suicide.  So the fact that Non- Hispanic white women were down 10%, Non-Hispanic white men were down 3% , it sort of drove the overall decline.  And there were some groups that just did not experience declines – in fact, they experienced increases.  In particular, Hispanic men had an increase of 5% and that did reach statistical significance, but there were also increases for Non-Hispanic black men and Non-Hispanic American Indian men.  So it is encouraging that the overall rate declined, but we certainly need to continue to be vigilant and to realize that this decline was not experienced by everyone.

HOST: Alright, thank you Sally for joining us.

SALLY CURTIN: Oh sure.  Thank you.


QuickStats: Rate of Unintentional Traumatic Brain Injury–Related Deaths Among Persons Aged ≤19 Years, by Age Group and Sex — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2018–2020

March 18, 2022

During 2018–2020, death rates for unintentional traumatic brain injury among persons aged ≤19 years were higher for males than for females in each age group.

Rates were highest for males (6.1 per 100,000) and females (2.9) among persons aged 15–19 years.

Rates were lowest for males and females aged 5–9 years (1.1 and 0.8, respectively) and for males and females aged 10–14 years (1.3 and 0.8, respectively).

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7111a5.htm