Provisional Monthly Drug Overdose Deaths from July 2019 to July 2020

February 17, 2021

On Wednesday (February 17) NCHS released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 22.8% from the 12 months ending in July 2019 to the 12 months ending in July 2020, from  68,023 to  83,544.  After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 24.2% from the 12 months ending in July 2019 to the 12 months ending in July 2020, from 69,266 to  86,001.

The reported number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in July 2020 (61,297) increased from 47,474 in the previous year. The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in July 2020 (63,129) increased from 48,429 in the previous year. Recent trends may still be partially due to incomplete data.

The reported and predicted number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone; T40.4) and psychostimulants with abuse potential (T43.6) continued to increase compared to the previous year. Both reported and predicted overdose deaths involving cocaine increased compared to the previous year. The reported and predicted number of natural and semi-synthetic opioid deaths also increased compared to the previous year


QuickStats: Death Rates for Motor-Vehicle–Traffic Injuries, Suicide, and Homicide Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–24 Years — United States, 1999–2019

February 5, 2021

Mortality rates for adolescents and young adults aged 15–24 years for deaths from motor-vehicle–traffic injury, suicide, and homicide remained relatively stable during 1999–2006 and then exhibited different patterns through 2019.

In 1999, the rate for motor-vehicle–traffic deaths was 25.6 per 100,000 population and declined to 13.7 in 2019. The suicide rate was 10.1 in 1999 and increased to 14.5 in 2018 before declining to 13.9 in 2019.

The homicide rate was 12.9 in 1999 and declined to 9.5 in 2014 before increasing to 11.2 in 2019.

In 2019, the death rates for motor-vehicle–traffic injury and suicide were similar; both rates were higher than the homicide rate.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2009–2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7005a6.htm


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru June 2020)

January 14, 2021

 

NCHS released the latest monthly provisional data on drug overdose deaths in America on Wednesday.  This release covers the one-year period ending in June of 2020, and the impact of the pandemic on drug abuse in the country is reflected in the new numbers.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 19.5% from the 12 months ending in June 2019 to the 12 months ending in June 2020, from 67,787 to 81,003.  After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 21.3% from the 12 months ending in June 2019 to the 12 months ending in June 2020, from 68,711 to 83,335.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm

 


Increases in Prepregnancy Obesity: United States, 2016–2019

November 25, 2020

A new NCHS report presents trends in prepregnancy obesity for 2016 through 2019 by maternal race and Hispanic origin, age, and educational attainment. Trends by state for 2016–2019 and 2019 rates also are shown.

Key Findings:

  • Prepregnancy obesity in the United States rose from 26.1% in 2016 to 29.0% in 2019 and increased steadily for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women.
  • From 2016 through 2019, prepregnancy obesity increased among women of all ages and was lowest for women under age 20 (20.5% in 2019).
  • From 2016 through 2019, women with less than a bachelor’s degree were more likely to have prepregnancy obesity than those with a bachelor’s degree or higher, but obesity increased over time among all education levels.
  • Compared with 2016, prepregnancy obesity rose in every state but Vermont in 2019.

QuickStats: Death Rates from Unintentional Falls Among Persons Aged ≥65 Years, by Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–2018

November 13, 2020

From 1999 to 2018, death rates from unintentional falls among persons aged ≥65 years increased among all age groups.

The largest increase occurred among persons aged ≥85 years, from 110.2 per 100,000 in 1999 to 270.5 in 2018.

For persons aged 75–84 years, the rate increased from 31.5 to 63.1, and among those aged 65–74 years, the rate increased from 9.0 to 16.8.

Throughout the period, rates were highest among persons aged ≥85 years, followed by rates among persons aged 75–84 years, and were lowest among persons aged 65–74 years.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6945a10.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Alzheimer Disease Among Adults Aged 65 Years or Older, by Sex and Race/Hispanic Origin

November 6, 2020

In 2018, the age-adjusted death rate for Alzheimer disease among adults aged 65 years or older was higher for women (267.9 deaths per 100,000) than for men (191.9).

Among men, non-Hispanic White men had the highest death rate (201.7) compared with non-Hispanic Black (176.8) and Hispanic (168.4) men.

Among women, non-Hispanic White women (285.1) had the highest death rate, followed by non-Hispanic Black (234.7) and Hispanic (218.8) women.

Compared with men, women had higher age-adjusted death rates from Alzheimer disease in all three race and Hispanic-origin groups.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6944a7.htm


QuickStats: Rate of Unintentional Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)–Related Deaths Among Persons Aged 24 Years and Under, by Age Group

October 16, 2020

From 1999 to 2018, death rates for unintentional TBI among persons aged 24 years and under declined across all age groups.

During the 20-year period, TBI-related death rates declined from 3.7 per 100,000 to 1.5 among children aged 0–4 years, from 3.0 to 0.9 for children and adolescents aged 5–14 years, from 14.7 to 4.4 for adolescents and young adults aged 15–19 years, and from 14.1 to 6.9 for young adults aged 20–24 years.

For most of the period, rates were highest for persons aged 20–24 years followed by those aged 15–19, 0–4, and 5–14 years.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6941a5.htm


QuickStats: Death Rates from Influenza and Pneumonia Among Persons Aged 65 Years or Older

October 9, 2020

In 2018, the death rate from influenza and pneumonia among persons aged 65 years or older was 93.2 deaths per 100,000 population.

Death rates increased with age from 31.7 deaths per 100,000 population among adults aged 65–74 years, to 94.2 among adults aged 75–84 years, to 377.6 among those aged 85 years or older.

Rates increased with age for both men and women, and in each age group the death rates were higher for men than for women.

Source: National Vital Statistics System mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6940a5.htm


Births in the United States, 2019

October 9, 2020

A new NCHS report presents selected highlights from 2019 final birth data on key demographic, health care utilization, and infant health indicators.

General fertility rates (the number of births per 1,000 women aged 15–44), prenatal care timing (the percentage of mothers with first trimester care), source of payment for the delivery (the percentage of births covered by Medicaid), and preterm birth rates are presented.

All indicators are compared between 2018 and 2019 and are presented for all births and for the three largest race and Hispanic-origin groups: non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic.

Findings from the Report:

  • The U.S. general fertility rate declined 1% in 2019 to 58.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44 from 59.1 in 2018; rates declined for non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women.
  • The percentage of mothers beginning prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy increased from 2018 to 2019 among non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black women, but decreased among Hispanic women.
  • Medicaid as the source of payment for the delivery declined from 42.3% to 42.1% from 2018 to 2019.
  • The preterm birth rate rose 2% from 2018 to 2019 from 10.02% to 10.23%; rates rose for each race and Hispanic origin group.

Motor Vehicle Traffic Death Rates Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–24, by Urbanicity: United States, 2000–2018

October 8, 2020

Questions for Sally Curtin, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Motor Vehicle Traffic Death Rates Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–24, by Urbanicity: United States, 2000–2018.”


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

SC: The finding that the difference in MVT death rates between persons aged 15-24 and 25 years and over has narrowed so much since 2000 so that the rate is only 7% higher for 15-24 year-olds in 2018.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

SC: These data are from the National Vital Statistics System and come from the information from death certificates in the United States.  All of the rates in this report are reproducible from the CDC WONDER online database.


Q: How do you classify urban and rural areas?

SC: The National Center for Health Statistics developed a scheme (the latest published in 2013) to classify the urbanicity of counties by combining information on whether the county was considered to be part of a metropolitan area and the population of the county.  Based on this, there are four categories of Metropolitan (urban) counties, from largest to smallest, and two categories of rural counties.


Q: Is this the first report on motor vehicle deaths with an urban and rural breakdown?  Is there any trend data that goes back further than 2000?

SC: A recent NCHS report examined trends in MVT deaths by urban-rural classification but it was for all ages combined.  This is the first report to focus on trends in younger adults, aged 15-24, by urban-rural.

There is MVT trends data prior to 2000, although they are not entirely comparable to the data from 1999 to the present.  However, trends from 1980-1999 rates are generally downward.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

SC: There has been great progress in reducing death rates to young adults aged 15-24, for whom this has been a leading cause of death.  However, the disparity in rates that still exist between rural and urban counties shows that there is more work to be done, particularly in the most rural areas.