Provisional Drug Overdose Deaths from 12 months ending in April 2022

September 14, 2022

New provisional data show that the number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by almost 7% from the 12 months ending in April 2021 to the 12 months ending in April 2022, from 101,167 to 108,174.

The number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in April 2022 (81,692) increased from 76,383 in the previous year.

The number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone; T40.4), psychostimulants with abuse potential (T43.6), and cocaine (T40.5) continued to increase compared to the previous year.


Update to Provisional Drug Overdose Deaths from 12 months ending in February 2022

July 13, 2022

Provisional data show that the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of almost 12% from the 12 months ending in February 2021 to the 12 months ending in February 2022, from 97,109 to 108,642.

The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in February 2022 (81,857) increased from 72,930 in the previous year. Recent trends may be partially due to incomplete data.

The predicted number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone; T40.4), psychostimulants with abuse potential (T43.6), and cocaine (T40.5) continued to increase compared to the previous year.


Update to Provisional Drug Overdose Deaths from 12 months ending in January 2022

June 15, 2022

Provisional data show that the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 12.5% from 12 months ending in January 2022, from 95,440 to 107,375.

The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in January 2022 (80,590) increased from 71,469 in the previous year.

The number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids and psychostimulants with abuse potential continue to increase compared to the previous year.

Drug overdose deaths involving cocaine also increased compared to the previous year.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Monthly Provisional Drug Overdose Counts through September 2021

February 16, 2022

NCHS has released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.  The monthly counts are released under the Vital Statistics Rapid Release program as an interactive data visualization.

Note that due to recent improvements in the timeliness of death certificate reporting, provisional estimates of drug overdose deaths will now be reported 4 months after the date of death, shortening the previous 6-month lag by 2 months (Please see the Technical Notes of the dashboard for more information). Thus, the new update today features data on the 12-month period ending in September 2021.


Drug Overdose Deaths in the U.S. Top 100,000 Annually

November 17, 2021

Provisional data from NCHS indicate that there were an estimated 100,306 drug overdose deaths in the United States during 12-month period ending in April 2021, an increase of 28.5% from the 78,056 deaths during the same period the year before.

Read more here:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/nchs_press_releases/2021/20211117.htm

The interactive web dashboard is available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Drug Overdose Deaths in the U.S. Up Nearly 30% in 2020

July 14, 2021

drug_OD_2020The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has released full-year 2020 provisional drug overdose death data that estimates 93,331 drug overdose deaths in the United States during 2020, an increase of 29.4% from the 72,151 deaths predicted in 2019.

The data featured in an interactive web data visualization estimates overdose deaths from opioids increased from 50,963 in 2019 to 69,710 in 2020. Overdose deaths from synthetic opioids (primarily fentanyl) and psychostimulants such as methamphetamine also increased in 2020 compared to 2019. Cocaine deaths also increased in 2020, as did deaths from natural and semi-synthetic opioids (such as prescription pain medication).


Urban-Rural Differences in Drug Overdose Death Rates, 1999-2019

March 17, 2021

Questions for Holly Hedegaard, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Urban-Rural Differences in Drug Overdose Death Rates, 1999-2019.”

Q: How do drug overdose death rates in urban and rural areas compare?

HH: Over the past 20 years, rates of drug overdose deaths have increased in both urban and rural areas. Rates in rural areas were higher than in urban areas from 2007 through 2015, but in 2016 that pattern changed. From 2016 through 2019, rates have been higher in urban areas than in rural areas.

Although urban rates are higher than rural rates nationally, for 5 states (California, Connecticut, North Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia), rates are higher in rural areas than in urban areas.


Q: Is this the most recent data you have on this topic?  When do you plan on releasing 2020 data?

HH: Final 2020 data won’t be released until the end of 2021. In the interim, monthly provisional estimates of drug overdose death rates are available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

HH: In this report, we looked at trends in rates for drug overdose deaths involving certain types of opioids, including natural and semisynthetic opioids. This group includes such drugs as hydrocodone, oxycodone, and codeine – drugs that are often thought of as prescription opioids. In looking at the trends from 1999 through 2019, the rates of drug overdose deaths involving natural and semisynthetic opioids were higher in rural than in urban areas from 2004 through 2017, but in 2018 and 2019, the urban and rural rates were similar, because of a decline in the rates in rural areas. We will continue to monitor whether this decline in the rate continues.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

HH: The key messages from this report are: 1) for the past 20 years, drug overdose death rates have increased in both urban and rural areas, and 2) there are urban-rural differences in the rates of drug overdose deaths involving specific types of drugs. For example, for the past 20 years, rates of drug overdose deaths involving cocaine or heroin have been consistently higher in urban areas than in rural areas. In contrast, in recent years, rates of drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants (such as methamphetamine) have been higher in rural areas than in urban areas.


Q: Do you think rural counties will go back to having higher drug overdose death rates in the future?

HH: It’s impossible to predict what will happen in the future. While a lot of resources have been devoted to prevention and treatment of drug overdose in recent years, new drugs are becoming available all the time. NCHS will continue to monitor drug overdose deaths to identify patterns to help inform public health efforts.


Opioid-involved Emergency Department Visits in the National Hospital Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

December 15, 2020

Questions for Geoffrey Jackson, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Opioid-involved Emergency Department Visits in the National Hospital Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.”

Q: Why did you decide to research opioid-involved emergency department (ED) visits?

GJ: From 2005 through 2014, it is estimated that the rate of ED visits due to opioid use increased 99.4%, from 89.1 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 177.7 per 100,000 population in 2014. We were struck by the large increase and know that ED data can provide critical information on opioid use-related treatments, such as opioid use disorder treatment, detoxification for safe opioid withdrawal, and management of adverse effects. NCHS hospital surveys can be used to monitor trends in opioid overdoses, as well as other opioid-related morbidity and mortality measures.


Q: Can describe the difference between the difference between the National Hospital Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey?

GJ: Even though both surveys collect data from hospital emergency departments, the mode of data collection differs between the two surveys. The National Hospital Care Survey (NHCS) is an all-electronic data collection of administrative claims or billing data. NCHS receives all inpatient, ED, and outpatient hospitals for a calendar year.  In addition, to patient demographics, diagnoses, procedures, laboratory tests, and medications, NHCS collects patient name, address, and Social Security number, which allows patients to be followed over time and linkage to external data sources, such as the National Death Index, providing a more complete picture of patient care and post-acute mortality.

In contrast, the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) data collection relies on medical record abstraction by U.S. Census Bureau field representatives during a 4-week period. A random sample of about 100 ED visits are selected from all visits during the reporting period, and data are manually abstracted directly from medical records by Census staff. NHAMCS collects similar information as NHCS, but NHAMCS does not collect patient identifiers.  As a consequence, NHAMCS data cannot be linked to other sources nor can patients be collected over time.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

GJ: One finding that surprised me was the increase in percentage the patients that died of an opioid overdose 90 days after their hospital visits. Specifically, of the patients with an opioid-involved ED visit that died with 91 and 365 days after their ED visit, 20.6% died with an opioid overdose, compared to approximately 15% that died within 90 days post-ED visit died of an opioid overdose.


Q: Is this the most recent data you have on this topic?

GJ: The most recent NHCS data available in the NCHS Research Data Center (RDC) are from 2016. The 2016 NHCS data are linked to the 2016 and 2017 National Death Index and include information on specific drugs mentioned on the death certificate from the Drug-Involved Mortality file. Additionally, the 2016 NHCS RDC data include identification of opioids using an enhanced methodology that uses natural language processing and machine learning techniques. The most recent NHAMCS public use data file available are from 2018.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

GJ: NHCS is an important data source for studying opioid-involved ED visits. Through the collection of patient identifiers, the data can be linked to the National Death Index to provide information on post-acute mortality. The information on post-acute mortality is not available in other hospital data sources. Even though the NHCS data are not nationally representative, the NHCS data have similar distributions to NHAMCS data for national estimates of ED visits of male and female opioid-involved ED visits and for persons aged 35 and over.


Prevalence of Prescription Pain Medication Use Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018

June 24, 2020

FROM THE AUTHOR

In 2015–2018, 10.7% of U.S. adults used one or more prescription pain medications in the past 30 days.  Prescription pain medication use was higher among women than men overall and within each age category. Use increased with age overall and among men and women. Prescription pain medication use was lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults, and use among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults. This same pattern of prescription pain medication use was observed among both men and women.

Additionally, this report estimated the percentage of adults who used one or more opioid prescription pain medications (with or without use of non-opioid prescription pain medications) and the percentage who used one ore more non-opioid prescription pain medication (without use of prescription opioids).  In 2015–2018, 5.7% of U.S. adults used prescription opioids and 5.0% used non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) in the past 30 days. Use of one or more prescription opioids and use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) were higher among women than men, and increased with age, and were lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults.  Use of one or more prescription opioids among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults.

From 2009–2010 to 2017–2018, there was no significant increase in use of prescription opioids, but use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) increased.

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018.


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru November 2019)

June 17, 2020

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm