QuickStats: Percentage of Children Aged 4–17 Years Who Had Ever Had Varicella (Chickenpox), by Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, 2007–2016

December 11, 2017

During 2007–2016, the percentage of children aged 4–17 years who had ever had chickenpox decreased among both younger children (aged 4–11 years) and older children (aged 12–17 years).

Among younger children, the percentage of children who had ever had chickenpox declined by 73.9%, from 16.1% in 2007 to 4.2% in 2016.

Among older children the percentage who had ever had chickenpox declined by 76.9%, from 61.4% in 2007 to 14.2% in 2016.

During 2007–2016, older children were more likely than younger children to have ever had chickenpox.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2007–2016

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6648a7.htm

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QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20–64 Years With a Fasting Test in the Past 12 Months for High Blood Sugar or Diabetes, by Race/Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2011 and 2016

December 4, 2017

The percentage of U.S. adults aged 20–64 years who had a fasting test for high blood sugar or diabetes in the past 12 months increased from 39.7% in 2011 to 45.7% in 2016.

From 2011 to 2016, there was an increase in the percentage for all racial/ethnic groups examined: Hispanic (38.3% to 43.0%), non-Hispanic white (39.6% to 46.5%), non-Hispanic black (41.2% to 44.9%), and non-Hispanic Asian (41.5% to 49.6%) adults.

In 2011, there was no statistically significant difference among the four groups examined, but in 2016, Hispanic adults were less likely than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian adults to have had a fasting test, and non-Hispanic Asian adults were more likely than non-Hispanic black adults to have had one.

Source: National Health Interview Survey

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6647a7.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Visits to Office-Based Physicians by Adults Aged 18 Years or Older for Diabetes Mellitus, by Sex and Age — National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015

November 27, 2017

In 2015, diabetes was a reason for 4.2% of visits by adults to office-based physicians.

Men aged 18–44 years had a higher percentage of visits for diabetes compared with women aged 18–44 years (2.2% versus 0.4%, respectively).

Both women and men aged 18–44 years had a lower percentage of visits for diabetes compared with adults aged 45–64 and over 65 years.

Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015 data

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6646a7.htm 

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Children and Teens Aged 6–17 Years Who Missed More Than 10 Days of School in the Past 12 Months Because of Illness or Injury, by Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties Status and Age Group

November 13, 2017

During 2014–2016, children aged 6–17 years whose parent or guardian indicated the child had serious emotional or behavioral difficulties (EBDs) were almost four times as likely to miss more than 10 days of school because of illness or injury compared with children without serious EBDs (13.4% compared with 3.5%).

Among children with serious EBDs, those aged 6–10 years were less likely (8%) to miss more than 10 days of school compared with children aged 11–14 years (15.6%) and children aged 15–17 years (19.5%).

Among children without serious EBDs those aged 15–17 years (4.7%) were more likely to miss >10 school days compared with children aged 6–10 years (3%) and children aged 11–14 years (3.3%).

Source: National Center for Health Statistics. National Health Interview Survey, 2014–2016

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6644a13.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 45 Years or Older Who Were Limited in Any Way Because of Difficulty Remembering or Periods of Confusion,† by Race/Ethnicity — United States, 2014–2016

November 6, 2017

Overall, 5.1% of adults aged 45 years or older were limited in any way because of difficulty remembering or periods of confusion.

The percentage of adults experiencing this limitation was highest among non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native adults (9.8%) and non-Hispanic black adults (7.4%), followed by Hispanic adults (5.6%), non-Hispanic white adults (4.7%), and non-Hispanic Asian adults (4.1%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2014–2016 data.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6643a10.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20 or Older Years Who Reported Being Told by a Doctor or Health Professional to Increase Their Physical Activity by Age Group and Obesity Status

October 27, 2017

During 2011–2014, 33.2% of adults aged 20 years or older reported that a doctor or health professional told them to increase their physical activity.

More than half (52.2%) of adults aged 20 years or older with obesity reported that a doctor or health professional told them to increase their physical activity compared with less than a quarter (22.3%) of adults without obesity.

This pattern remained the same for all age groups examined. For both adults with and without obesity, the proportion who reported being told to increase their physical activity increased with age.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2014.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6642a11.htm


QuickStats: Infant Mortality Rate, by Urbanization Level — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2007 and 2015

October 20, 2017

In both 2007 and 2015, infant mortality rates were highest in rural counties (7.5 infant deaths per 1,000 live births and 6.8, respectively).

Rates were lower in small and medium urban counties (7.1 in 2007 and 6.4 in 2015) and lowest in large urban counties (6.4 in 2007 and 5.4 in 2015).

For all three urbanization levels, infant mortality rates were significantly lower in 2015, compared with rates in 2007.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, linked birth/infant death period files, 2007 and 2015.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6641a8.htm