QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 50 Years or Older with Osteoporosis, by Race and Hispanic Origin — United States, 2017–2018

May 14, 2021

mm7019a5-f

During 2017–2018, the age-adjusted prevalence of osteoporosis among adults aged 50 years or older was 12.6%.

A lower percentage of non-Hispanic Black adults (6.8%) had osteoporosis compared with non-Hispanic White adults (12.9%), non-Hispanic Asian adults (18.4%), and Hispanic adults (14.7%).

The observed differences among non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic adults did not reach statistical significance.

Sources: Sarafrazi N, Wambogo EA, Shepherd JA. Osteoporosis or low bone mass in older adults: United States, 2017–2018. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief, no. 405. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db405.htm; NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHNES) data, NHNES 2017–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7019a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 or Older with Diagnosed Diabetes by Urbanization Level and Age Group

May 7, 2021

mm7018a4-fIn 2019, the percentage of adults aged 18 years or older with diagnosed diabetes was higher among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (12.4%) than among those living in metropolitan areas (8.9%).

Percentages of adults with diagnosed diabetes were higher in nonmetropolitan than metropolitan areas for those aged 18–44 years (3.5% versus 2.3%) and 45–64 years (15.2% versus 11.6%).

Among adults aged 65 years or older, the difference by urbanization level (21.9% in nonmetropolitan areas versus 19.8% in metropolitan areas) did not reach statistical significance.

The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes increased with age in both nonmetropolitan and metropolitan areas.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7018a4.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Arthritis, by Sex and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2019

April 30, 2021

mm7017a7-F

In 2019, among adults aged 18 years or older, prevalence of arthritis (including rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia) increased with age among both men and women.

For men, prevalence increased from 5.8% among those aged 18–44 years to 22.3% among those aged 45–64 years, 40.1% among those aged 65–74 years, and 44.7% among those aged 75 years or older.

For women, prevalence increased from 6.6% among those aged 18–44 years to 29.3% among those aged 45–64 years, 48.6% among those aged 65–74 years, and 57.8% among those aged 75 years or older.

Women were more likely to have arthritis than were men overall (24.3% versus 18.3%) and in all age groups except 18–44 years, where the difference did not reach statistical significance.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics. National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7017a7.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Alzheimer Disease Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years, by Sex — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–2019

April 23, 2021

mm7016a5-f

The age-adjusted death rate for Alzheimer disease increased from 128.8 per 100,000 in 1999 to 233.8 in 2019.

The trend for the total population and for men and women alternated between periods of general increase and periods of stability. Rates were stable from 2016 to 2019, and in 2019 were 263.0 for women and 186.3 for men.

Throughout the 1999–2019 period, the rate was higher for women than for men.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 1999–2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 25–64 Years Who Are Very Worried About Their Ability to Pay Medical Bills if They Get Sick or Have an Accident, by Sex and Veteran Status

April 16, 2021

mm7015a8-f-medium

In 2019, among adults aged 25–64 years, veterans (11.5%) were less likely than nonveterans (20.1%) to be very worried about their ability to pay their medical bills if they get sick or have an accident.

This pattern was found for both men and women, with veterans less likely than nonveterans to be very worried about medical bills: 11.4% versus 17.5% for men and 12.5% versus 22.4% for women, respectively.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7015a8.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Influenza and Pneumonia, by Urbanization Level and Sex — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2019

March 26, 2021

mm7012a5-f

In 2019, age-adjusted death rates for influenza and pneumonia were higher among males (14.4 per 100,000) than females (10.7) and among those who lived in rural counties (15.3) compared with those who lived in urban counties (11.7).

Among males, the age-adjusted death rate for influenza and pneumonia was 17.4 in rural counties and 13.9 in urban counties.

Among females, the age-adjusted death rate for influenza and pneumonia was 13.6 in rural counties and 10.2 in urban counties.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality file. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7012a5.htm


QuickStats: Rates of Firearm-Related Deaths Among Persons Aged 15 Years or Older, by Selected Intent and Age Group

March 12, 2021

Among persons aged 15 years or older, for all firearm-related deaths (all intents), rates were highest among those aged 15–24 years (17.4 per 100,000).

For deaths involving firearm-related suicides, rates increased with age, from 6.6 among persons aged 15–24 years to 11.8 among those aged 65 years or older.

A different pattern was found for firearm-related homicides, in which rates decreased with age, from 10.2 among those aged 15–24 years to 0.9 among those aged 65 years or older.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7010a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults in Fair or Poor Health, by Age Group and Race and Ethnicity

March 5, 2021

In 2019, the percentage of adults in fair or poor health increased by age (7.8% for those aged 18–39 years, 17.2% for those 40–64 years, and 25.1% for those ≥65 years) and for each racial/ethnic group shown.

Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black adults were most likely to be in fair or poor health in each age group.

Among persons aged 18–39 and 40–64 years, non-Hispanic Asian adults were least likely to be in fair or poor health.

Among persons aged ≥65 years, non-Hispanic Asian and non-Hispanic White adults were least likely to be in fair or poor health.

Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black adults aged ≥65 years had the highest percentages of fair or poor health (40.3% and 35.5%, respectively), and non-Hispanic Asian adults aged 18–39 years had the lowest percentage of fair or poor health (4.1%).

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm


QuickStats: Motor-Vehicle–Traffic Death Rates Among Persons Aged 15–24 Years and ≥25 Years — United States, 2000–2019

February 26, 2021

From 2000 to 2006, rates of death caused by motor-vehicle–traffic injuries among persons aged 15–24 years and ≥25 years did not change significantly.

From 2006 to 2010, motor-vehicle–traffic death rates per 100,000 population declined among those aged 15–24 years, from 25.1 (2006) to 16.1 (2010), and among those aged ≥25 years, from 15.9 (2006) to 12.5 (2010).

Throughout most of the period, motor-vehicle–traffic death rates were higher among persons aged 15–24 years; however, motor-vehicle–traffic death rates began to converge in more recent years, and by 2019, the difference in the rate among those aged 15–24 years (13.7) and those aged ≥25 years (13.6) was not statistically significant.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2000–2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7008a6.htm


QuickStats: Death Rates Attributed to Excessive Cold or Hypothermia† Among Persons Aged15 Years or older, by Urban-Rural Status and Age Group

February 19, 2021

In 2019, among persons aged 15 years or older, death rates attributed to excessive cold or hypothermia were higher in rural areas than in urban areas across every age group.

Crude rates were lowest among those aged 15–34 years at 0.2 and 0.5 per 100,000 population in urban and rural areas, respectively.

Rates increased with age, with the highest rates among those aged 85 years or older at 4.6 in urban areas and 8.6 in rural areas. Differences between urban and rural rates also increased with age.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data 2019. https://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd-icd10.html

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7007a6.htm