QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥65 Years Who Received Care at Home From a Nurse or Other Health Care Professional During the Past 12 Months

July 10, 2020

In 2018, the percentage of adults aged ≥65 years who received care at home from a nurse or other health care professional during the past 12 months increased with age from 4.5% for adults aged 65–69 years, to 8.2% for those aged 70–74 years and 13.2% for those aged ≥75 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6927a7.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Currently Have Asthma by Sex and Race/Ethnicity

June 26, 2020

During 2017–2018, women aged 18 years or older were more likely than men (9.7% versus 5.5%) to currently have asthma.

This pattern prevailed in each of the race/ethnicity groups: Hispanic adults (7.8% versus 3.9%); non-Hispanic white adults (10.3% versus 5.9%); non-Hispanic black adults (11.4% versus 6.2%); and non-Hispanic Asian adults (5.0% versus 3.3%).

Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men were more likely to currently have asthma than were Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian men.

The same pattern existed among women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017–2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6925a7.htm


QuickStats: Reason for the Most Recent Colonoscopy Among Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Had a Test in the Past 10 Years

June 19, 2020

In 2018, 60.6% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years without a personal history of colorectal cancer had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years.

Of these, 81.2% had their most recent colonoscopy as part of routine screening, 10.6% had their most recent colonoscopy because of a problem, 5.2% as a follow-up to an earlier test or screening exam, and 2.8% for some other reason.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6924a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Families That Did Not Get Needed Medical Care Because of Cost by Poverty Status

June 12, 2020

The percentage of all families that did not get needed medical care because of cost in the past 12 months decreased from 12.1% in 2013 to 9.7% 2018.

From 2013 to 2018, the percentage of poor families that did not get medical care decreased (22.7% to 17.3%) as did the percentage of near-poor families (20.4% to 16.0%); no significant change occurred for not-poor families (7.1% and 6.6%).

In 2013 and 2018, the percentage of families that did not get needed medical care because of cost was lowest among the not poor.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2013 and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6923a4.htm


QuickStats: Prevalence of High Total Cholesterol Among Adults Aged 20 Years or Older by Age Group and Sex

June 5, 2020

During 2015–2018, the prevalence of high total cholesterol among adults aged 20 years or older was 11.4%, with no significant difference between men (10.5%) and women (12.1%). Prevalence was highest among adults aged 40–59 years (15.7%), followed by those aged 60 years or older (11.4%), and lowest among those aged 20–39 years (7.5%).

Among men, the prevalence was highest among those aged 40–59 years (14.5%), followed by those aged 20–39 years (9.5%), and lowest among those aged 60 years or older (6.0%).

Among women, the pattern was different, with women aged 20–39 years (5.5%) having a lower prevalence than either women aged 40–59 years (16.9%) or women aged 60 years or older (15.9%).

Prevalence among women aged 20–39 years was lower than that among men in this age group, but prevalence was higher among women aged 60 years or older than it was among men of that age group. There was no significant difference between men and women for adults aged 40–59 years.

Sources: Carroll MD, Fryar CD. Total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in adults: United States, 2015–2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 363. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db363.htm. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6922a5.htm


Quickstats: Cancer and Heart Disease Death Rates Among Men and Women Aged 45–64 Years — United States, 1999–2018

May 29, 2020

The cancer death rate for both men and women aged 45–64 years declined steadily from 247.0 per 100,000 in 1999 to 194.9 in 2018 for men and from 204.1 to 166.3 for women.

The heart disease death rate for men declined from 1999 (235.7) to 2011 (183.5) but then increased to 192.9 in 2018. For women, the heart disease death rate declined from 1999 (96.8) to 2011 (74.9), increased through 2016 (80.3), and then leveled off.

In 2018, the cancer death rate for men aged 45–64 years was 1% higher than the heart disease death rate; for women, the cancer death rate was approximately twice the heart disease death rate.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6921a4.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older with Disability by Diagnosed Diabetes Status and Age Group

May 22, 2020

In 2018, among adults aged 18 years or older, those ever receiving a diagnosis of diabetes were more likely to have disability than those never receiving a diagnosis of diabetes (27.1% versus 8.1%).

This pattern was consistent among adults aged 18–44 (16.3% versus 4.4%), 45–64 (24.5% versus 8.1%), and 65 years or older (33.3% versus 18.5%).

Regardless of diabetes status, the percentage of adults with disability increased with age.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6920a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Deaths, by Place of Death — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000–2018

May 15, 2020

The percentage of deaths from all causes that occurred in a hospital decreased from 48.0% in 2000 to 35.1% in 2018.

During that period, the percentage of deaths that occurred in the decedent’s home increased from 22.7% to 31.4%, and the percentage that occurred in a long-term care facility (hospice, nursing home, long-term care) increased from 22.9% to 26.8%.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Underlying cause of death data, 2000–2018. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Who Have Difficulty Seeing Even When Wearing Glasses by Poverty Status

May 8, 2020

In 2018, 14.9% of adults aged 18 years or older had some difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses, and 1.6% had a lot of difficulty or could not see at all.

The percentage of adults who had some difficulty seeing even when wearing glasses decreased as income increased, from 19.3% among those with income below the poverty threshold to 11.3% among those with income more than 400% of the poverty threshold.

The percentage of adults who had a lot of difficulty or could not see at all also decreased as income increased, from 4.2% among those with income below the poverty threshold to 0.8% among those with income more than 400% of the poverty threshold.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.


QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Reported an Average of 6 Hours of Sleep or less per 24-Hour Period, by Employment Category

April 24, 2020

The percentage of employed adults who reported an average of 6 hours or less of sleep per 24-hour period increased from 28.4% during 2008–2009 to 32.6% during 2017–2018.

During this period, increases were noted among private sector employees (29.5% to 33.3%), government employees (28.8% to 32.8%), and the self-employed (24.3% to 31.4%).

A lower percentage of the self- employed reported 6 hours or less of sleep compared with private sector and government employees during 2008–2009.

The smaller differences by employment categories noted during 2017–2018 were not statistically significant.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2008–2009 and 2017–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6916a5.htm