Dental Care Among Adults Aged 65 Years and Over, 2017

May 29, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Ellen Kramarow, Health Statistician, of “Dental Care Among Adults Aged 65 Years and Over, 2017.”

Q: Why focus on dental care among adults aged 65 years or older in the United States?

EK: Dental care is often overlooked as people age, but it is an important component of overall health care. Chronic diseases such as diabetes and osteoporosis, which are common among older persons, can affect oral health; in addition, having poor oral health may contribute to some chronic conditions and impact nutrition. Routine dental care is not covered under fee-for-service Medicare, so older adults may have trouble accessing appropriate dental care.


Q: What are the main findings on dental insurance, dental visits, and unmet dental care due to cost?

EK: In 2017, among adults aged 65 and over, 29.2% had dental insurance; 65.6% had a dental visit in the past 12 months; and 7.7% had an unmet need for dental care due to cost.

No statistically significant differences by sex were observed in any of these dental care indicators. Adults aged 65–74 were more likely to have dental insurance, to have visited the dentist in the past 12 months, and to have unmet need for dental care due to cost compared with adults over age 75.

Poor older adults were less likely to have dental insurance and to have visited the dentist, and more likely to have an unmet need for dental care due to cost compared with not-poor older adults.


Q: Are there any reasons why more U.S. adults aged 65 years or older don’t have dental insurance?

EK: Most older adults have access to health insurance through Medicare, which does not cover routine dental care.  Older adults who do have dental insurance may have obtained it through purchase of a separate dental plan, through retiree health benefits, through a Medicare Advantage plan, or through Medicaid.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

EK: Only 30.3% of older adults who were edentate (had no natural teeth) had a dental visit in the past 12 months, compared with 73.6% who had at least some natural teeth.  Even edentate adults need dental care to help maintain good oral health.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

EK: Many older adults do not receive dental care, and access to dental care varies by age, poverty status, and race and Hispanic origin.

Advertisements

Births: Provisional Data for 2018

May 15, 2019

Questions for Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author of “Births: Provisional Data for 2018.”

Q: How does the provisional 2018 birth data compare to previous years?

BH: The  number of births, the general fertility rate, the total fertility rate, birth rates for women aged 15-34, the cesarean delivery rate and the low-risk cesarean delivery rate declined from 2017 to 2018, whereas the birth rates for women aged 35-44 and the preterm birth rate rose.


Q: When do you expect the final 2018 birth report to come out?

BH: The 2018 final birth report is scheduled for release in the fall of 2019.


Q: How did the data vary by age and race?

BH:  Birth measures shown in the report varied widely by age and race and Hispanic origin groups. Birth rates ranged from 0.2 births per 1,000 females aged 10-14 to 99.6 births per 1,000 women aged 30-34. By race and Hispanic origin, the cesarean delivery rate ranged from 28.7% of births for non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native women to 36.1% for non-Hispanic black women and the preterm birth rate ranged from 8.56% for non-Hispanic Asian women to 14.12% for non-Hispanic black women.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the provisional data that surprised you?

BH: The report includes a number of interesting findings. The record lows reached for the general fertility rate, the total fertility rate and birth rates for females aged 15-19, 15-17, 18-19, and 20-24 are noteworthy. In addition, the magnitude of the continued decline in the birth rate for teens aged 15-19, down 7% from 2017 to 2018, is also historic.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

BH:  The number of births for the United States was down 2% from 2017 to 2018, as were the general fertility rate and the total fertility rate, with both at record lows in 2018. Birth rates declined for nearly all age groups of women under 35, but rose for women in their late 30s and early 40s. The birth rate for teenagers aged 15–19 was down 7% from 2017 to 2018. The cesarean delivery rate and low-risk cesarean delivery rate were down in 2018. The preterm birth rate rose for the fourth year in a row in 2018.


Q: Do you anticipate this drop will continue?

BH: The factors associated with family formation and childbearing are numerous and complex. The data on which the report are based come from all birth certificates registered in the U.S. While the scope of these data is wide, with detailed demographic and health   information on rare events, small areas, or small population groups, the data do not provide information on the attitudes and behavior of the parents regarding family formation and childbearing. Accordingly, these data do not answer the question of why the number of births dropped in 2018 or if the decline will continue.


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Reported That They Needed Dental Care During the Past 12 Months But Didn’t Get It Because They Couldn’t Afford It, by Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin

March 22, 2019

In 2017, more women (12.7%) than men (8.8%) reported that at some time during the past 12 months they needed dental care but didn’t get it because they couldn’t afford it.

This pattern was consistent within each racial/ethnic group: Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black.

Among both men and women, Hispanic adults were most likely to have unmet needs for dental care because they couldn’t afford it.

Nearly 17% of Hispanic women could not afford to meet their dental care needs, compared with 12.8% of non-Hispanic black women and 11.8% of non-Hispanic white women; 12.3% of Hispanic men had unmet dental care needs, compared with 8.6% of non-Hispanic black men and 8.3% of non-Hispanic white men.

Source: Tables of Summary Health Statistics, 2017.

https://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/NHIS/SHS/2017_SHS_Table_A-19.pdf.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6811a4.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of U.S. Women Aged 50–74 Years Who Have Ever Had Breast Cancer by Race and Hispanic Origin

January 25, 2019

During 2015–2017, 5.3% of U.S. women aged 50–74 years had ever been told they had breast cancer.

Non-Hispanic white women were more likely to have ever been told they had breast cancer (6.1%) compared with Hispanic women (3.2%) and non-Hispanic black women (3.6%).

There was no significant difference in the prevalence of breast cancer between Hispanic and non-Hispanic black women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2015–2017

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6803a6.htm


Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017

January 10, 2019

Questions for Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author of “Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on the total fertility rate in the United States?

BH: We produced this report because we were interested in what differences there were in the total fertility rate (TFR) by state and population group (race and Hispanic origin). This report presents the TFR for each state in 2017, both overall and for the three largest population groups — non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic. As noted in the report, fertility levels affect the size and composition of the population, and family size is associated with female labor force participation and economic growth, as well as other social and economic changes.


Q: Can you explain what the total fertility rate is and how is it different from the general fertility rate and crude birth rate?

BH: The total fertility rate is the number of births expected for a (hypothetical) group of 1,000 women over their lifetime, assuming the current age-specific birth rate hold. The crude birth rate and general fertility rate measure the number of births occurring for either the whole population or the population of women in their childbearing years (ages 15-44 year) in a given year. The TFR, on the other hand, estimates the number of births for women over a generation. For that reason, the TFR can be used to ascertain whether the number of births is at “replacement,” that is, the level at which a given group of women can exactly replace themselves (generally considered to be 2,100 births per 1,000 women for the TFR).


Q: How did total fertility rates vary by state and race in 2017?

BH: Differences in the total fertility rates among the states by race and Hispanic origin were considerable. For non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah (2,099.5, the highest) was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia (1,012.0, the lowest). For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine (4,003.5) was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming (1,146.0). For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama (3,085.0) was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont (1,200.5). In addition, there were no states with TFRs above replacement for non-Hispanic white women in 2017. However, for non-Hispanic black women, the TFRs for 12 states was above replacement. The TFRs for Hispanic women were above replacement in 29 states.


Q: Do you have trend data on total fertility rates that goes back 10 or 20 years?

BH: The report includes only data for 2017. However, trend data for the total fertility rate at the national level, by race and Hispanic origin group, are available from Births: Final Data for 2017 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf), Births: Final Data for 2015 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf), and Trends and Variations in Reproduction and Intrinsic Rates: United States, 1990-2014 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_02.pdf). In general, the TFR has declined over the last six decades, with the TFR being below replacement for all but two years (2006 and 2007) since 1971. In 2017, the rates for all groups were below replacement.


Q: Is there a finding in this report that surprised you?

BH: The range between the highest and lowest total fertility rate among the states by race and Hispanic origin groups is noteworthy. As we mentioned, for non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia. For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming. For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont.


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates from Lung Cancer by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2001–2016

August 6, 2018

During 2001–2016, the lung cancer death rates for the total population declined from 55.3 to 38.3 as well as for each racial/ethnic group shown.

During 2001–2016, the death rate for the non-Hispanic black population decreased from 63.3 to 41.2, for the non-Hispanic white population from 57.7 to 41.5, and for the Hispanic population from 23.9 to 16.6.

Throughout this period, the Hispanic population had the lowest death rate.

SOURCE: CDC/National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, 2001–2016, Mortality. CDC Wonder online database. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6730a8.htm?


QuickStats: Breast Cancer Death Rates Among Women Aged 50–74 Years, by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2006 and 2016

June 4, 2018

The U.S. death rate from breast cancer among all women aged 50–74 years decreased 15.1%, from 53.8 per 100,000 in 2006 to 45.7 in 2016.

In both 2006 and 2016, the death rate was higher among non-Hispanic black women compared with non-Hispanic white women and Hispanic women.

From 2006 to 2016, the death rate from breast cancer decreased for non-Hispanic white women from 54.6 per 100,000 to 46.2, for Hispanic women from 34.8 to 31.0, and for non-Hispanic black women from 71.7 to 64.1.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, 2006 and 2016. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6721a8.htm