QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Suicide Rates for Males and Females, by Race and Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000–2020

February 25, 2022

After increasing from 2000 to 2018, age-adjusted suicide rates for non-Hispanic White males and females declined from 2018 to 2020, from 28.6 per 100,000 to 27.2 for males and from 8.0 to 6.9 for females.

Rates for non-Hispanic Black males and Hispanic males were lower than that for non-Hispanic White males over the entire period and increased more recently to 13.1 and 12.3, respectively, in 2020.

Rates for non-Hispanic Black females and Hispanic females, also lower than rates for non-Hispanic White females over the entire period, generally increased throughout most of the period and then leveled off to 2.9 and 2.8, respectively, in 2020.

Rates for all races and ethnic groups were higher for males than for females throughout the period.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7108a7.htm


Q & A with Author: Mortality Profile of the Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native Population, 2019

November 9, 2021

Questions for Elizabeth Arias, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Mortality Profile of the Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native Population, 2019.”

Q: Is the first report on non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) mortality? 

EA: Yes. This is the first report that NCHS publishes exclusively on non-Hispanic AIAN mortality.  Limited mortality statistics for this population has been included in our standard mortality reports.


Q: Why is there an issue of misclassification of race and ethnicity on U.S. death certificates for the AIAN population?

EA: We do not know exactly why individuals who self-identify as AIAN while alive have a higher rate of being classified as a different race on their death certificates than other racial and ethnic populations.  What we know is that funeral directors who are responsible for filling out the demographic portion of the death certificate may rely on visual observation rather than ask family informants the race of decedent.  An important factor in visual misclassification is that the proportion of multiple race individuals, predominantly individuals who identify as both AIAN and white, within the AIAN population is relatively large.   


Q: Are there any differences in the leading causes of death order for the AIAN population compared to U.S. overall?

EA: Most of the 15 leading causes of death experienced by the non-Hispanic AIAN population are the same as those affecting the total US population.  However, there are important differences.  For the non-Hispanic AIAN population, homicide is the 13th leading cause of death whereas homicide is not one of the 15 leading causes of death for the total population. The order of the 15 leading causes of death differs for the non-Hispanic AIAN population.  Of note, Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is the 4th leading cause for this population but the 11th cause for the US overall, Suicide is the 8th vs 10th cause, and Alzheimer is the 11th vs 6th cause.


Q: Is there any trend data on life expectancy for the AIAN population prior to 2019?

EA: We publish death counts, and age-specific and age-adjusted death rates for the AIAN population annually in our final mortality reports.  However, these estimates are not adjusted for misclassification.  The most reliable mortality estimates published prior to this report were based on a linkage of Indian Health Service (HIS) patient registration data and vital statistics mortality data covering years 1990-2009.  The data covered 65% of the non-Hispanic AIAN population, those living in Contract Health Service Delivery Areas of the IHS.  A special issue of the American Journal of Publish Health was published (see American Journal of Public Health – Volume 104, Issue S3 (aphapublications.org).


Q: What is the main takeaway message from this report?

EA: Racial and ethnic health and mortality disparities in the US are profound.  The non-Hispanic AIAN mortality profile resembles that of some of the populations in the poorest, under developed countries in the world.


QuickStats: Infant Mortality Rates for Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Counties by Single Race and Hispanic Origin — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2019

November 5, 2021

In metropolitan counties, infant mortality rates were highest for infants of non-Hispanic Black mothers (10.60 infant deaths per 1,000 live births), followed by infants of non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (5.95), Hispanic (4.96), non-Hispanic White (4.22), and non-Hispanic Asian (3.34) mothers.

In nonmetropolitan counties, the mortality rate was also highest for infants of non-Hispanic Black mothers (10.85), followed by infants of non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (9.78), Hispanic (5.97), non-Hispanic White (5.63), and non-Hispanic Asian (4.85) mothers.

The infant mortality rate was significantly lower for infants of non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, and Hispanic mothers in metropolitan counties compared with nonmetropolitan counties; differences in rates between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties for infants of non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic Asian mothers were not statistically significant.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Linked Birth and Infant Death Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/linked-birth.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rates of Firearm-Related Homicide by Race, Hispanic Origin, and Sex — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2019

October 22, 2021

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In 2019, among males, non-Hispanic Black males had the highest age-adjusted rate of firearm-related homicide at 34.9 per 100,000 population and non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander males had the lowest rate (1.6).

Among females, non-Hispanic Black females had the highest rate (4.1) and non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander females had the lowest rate (0.5).

Males had higher rates than females across all race and Hispanic origin groups.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7042a6.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20 Years or Older Who Consumed Fruit on a Given Day, by Race and Hispanic Origin — United States, 2015–2018

September 10, 2021

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During 2015–2018, on a given day, 67.3% of adults aged ≥20 years consumed any fruit; 29.7% consumed citrus, melons, or berries; 47.5% consumed other whole fruits; and 30.8% consumed 100% fruit juice.

Non-Hispanic Asian (76.5%) and Hispanic adults (72.2%) were more likely to consume any fruit on a given day than non-Hispanic White (66.3%) and non-Hispanic Black adults (63.7%).

Non-Hispanic Black adults were least likely to consume citrus, melons, or berries (20.5%) and other whole fruit (35.6%), and non-Hispanic Asian adults were most likely to consume other whole fruits (60.1%).

A higher percentage of non-Hispanic Black (37.7%) and Hispanic (37.5%) adults consumed 100% fruit juice compared with non-Hispanic White (28.5%) and non-Hispanic Asian (28.9%) adults.

Source: NCHS Data Brief, no. 397, National Center for Health Statistics. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db397-H.pdf

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7036a5.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–26 Years Who Ever Received a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine, by Race and Hispanic Origin§ and Sex

May 28, 2021

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Overall, in 2019, 47.0% of adults aged 18–26 years had ever received an HPV vaccination.

Non-Hispanic White adults (49.7%) were more likely than Hispanic adults (40.6%) to have ever received an HPV vaccination; differences between non-Hispanic Black adults (45.8%) and the other two groups were not statistically significant.

Overall, women were more likely than men to have been vaccinated (56.6% versus 37.2%), and this pattern was seen for non-Hispanic White women and men (60.6% versus 38.6%) and for Hispanic women and men (50.2% versus 30.8%).

However, the difference between non-Hispanic Black women and men (48.9% versus 43.0%) was not statistically significant.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7021a5.htm


Total Fertility Rates, by Maternal Educational Attainment and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2019

May 12, 2021

NVSR70_5_cover1Questions for Brady Hamilton, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Total Fertility Rates, by Maternal Educational Attainment and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2019.”

Q: What is the difference between general fertility rates and total fertility rates?

BH: The general fertility rate is the number of births per 1,000 females aged 15–44 in a given year, whereas, the total fertility rate is the estimated number of births that a group of 1,000 women would have over their lifetimes, based on age-specific birth rates in a given year.


Q: Why did you decide to compare educational attainment with total fertility rates?

BH: Educational attainment is considered an important measure of socioeconomic status and can be useful in interpreting patterns and differences in fertility behavior both overall and among population groups. Maternal education has been shown to be associated with contraceptive use, the timing of childbearing, and the total number of children women have in their lifetimes. I wanted to examine the association between educational attainment and the expected number of births for women using the latest available vital statistics birth data (2019) from NCHS.


Q: How did the total fertility rates differ by educational attainment?

BH: Total fertility rates decreased as level of education increased from women with a 12th grade education or less through an associate’s and bachelor’s degree, and then increased from bachelor’s degree through a doctorate or professional degree, although the increase from master’s to doctorate or professional degree was not statistically significant.


Q: How did the total fertility rates by educational attainment differ by race?

BH: The patterns in and levels of the total fertility rates by educational attainment differed across the three race and Hispanic-origin groups shown in the report.

Total fertility rates generally declined from the lowest educational level through a bachelor’s degree for non-Hispanic white women, and through an associate’s degree for Hispanic women, and then generally rose for both groups for women with advanced degrees. Rates for non-Hispanic black women declined by educational level through a master’s degree.

Total fertility rates for non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with some college credit or less were generally higher than the rates for non-Hispanic white women, but TFRs for non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with a master’s degree or more were generally lower than the rates for non-Hispanic white women


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

BH: Yes, the span of the range in the total fertility rates was surprising, from the low of 1,284 for women with a bachelor’s degree to the high of 2,791 for women with a 12th grade education or less. To put this difference in perspective, a woman with a 12th grade education or less would be expected to have more than one additional birth compared with a woman with a bachelor’s degree.


Race and Hispanic-origin Disparities in Underlying Medical Conditions Associated With Severe COVID-19 Illness: U.S. Adults, 2015–2018

April 28, 2021

Figure_02192021A new NCHS report calculates the prevalence of selected conditions by race and Hispanic origin among U.S. adults (aged 20 and over) during 2015–2018.

Data were used from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Conditions included asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart disease based on self-report; and obesity, severe obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, smoking, and hypertension based on physical measurements

Findings:

  • An estimated 180.3 million (76.2%) U.S. adults had at least one condition during 2015–2018.
  • Approximately 86.4% of non-Hispanic black adults had at least one condition, 58.5% had at least two conditions, and 29% had at least three conditions; these prevalence estimates were significantly higher than among other race and Hispanic-origin groups.
  • Compared with non-Hispanic white adults, Hispanic adults had higher rates of obesity and diabetes.
  • Non-Hispanic Asian adults had lower rates of at least one condition, but higher rates of diabetes compared with non-Hispanic white adults.
  • Non-Hispanic black women were more likely to have multiple conditions, obesity, severe obesity, diabetes, and hypertension compared with non-Hispanic white women.
  • Non-Hispanic black men were more likely to have one or more conditions and hypertension compared with non-Hispanic white men.
  • Hispanic men were more likely to have diabetes compared with non-Hispanic white men.

QuickStats: Trends in Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Nonsmoking Adults, by Race† and Hispanic Origin — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 2009–2018

February 12, 2021

The percentage of nonsmoking adults exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) declined from 27.7% in 2009–2010 to 20.7% in 2017–2018.

During this period, decreasing trends in the percentage of persons with SHS exposure also were observed for nonsmoking non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, and Hispanic adults.

There was no significant decline in the percentage of persons with exposure for nonsmoking non-Hispanic Asian adults from 2011–2012 to 2017–2018.

The percentage of persons with SHS exposure was consistently higher for nonsmoking non-Hispanic Black adults throughout the period.

During 2017–2018, 41.5% of nonsmoking non-Hispanic Black adults were exposed to SHS compared with 22.7% non-Hispanic Asian, 17.8% non-Hispanic White, and 16.2% nonsmoking Hispanic adults.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7006a6.htm


Fact or Fiction: The gap in life expectancy between the black and white populations shrinks as people age

November 19, 2020

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/videos/2020/19november2020/FOF_19November_2020.htm