Prevalence of HPV in Adults Aged 18–69: United States, 2011–2014

April 6, 2017

Questions for Geraldine McQuillan, Ph.D., Statistician, and Lead Author of “Prevalence of HPV in Adults Aged 18–69: United States, 2011–2014”

Q:  Are these the first HPV estimates you’ve released?  If not, how has this problem changed over time?

GQ:  In this report we do not examine changes over time. But based on a report authored by one of our Co-authors, Dr. Markowitz, analyzing previously released NHANES data, since the highly efficaciously vaccine against HPV 6,11 and 18 was introduced in 2006, the prevalence of high risk HPV in female adolescents has decreased by 64% and among females age 20-24 years by 34%.


Q:  What do you think is the most striking finding in your report?

GQ:  That over 20% of the adult population of the US have high risk HPV detected with significant race/ethnic differences.


Q:  What are we to make of the relatively low HPV prevalence numbers among Asians?  Are they less promiscuous/sexually active?

GQ:  This is a brief report that provides estimates on HPV prevalence overall and by race/ethnic differences.  We did not further examine the characteristics of these individuals and cannot speculate on why the prevalence may be lower among Asian adults.


Q: Your report talks about people with “high risk” HPV being at a higher risk for cancer – but what is the difference between low risk HPV and high risk HPV?  How is that determined medically?

GQ:  It is not determined medically but by a laboratory test looking at subtypes that are associated with cancer. High risk subtypes have been associated with oral, genital and anal cancers, while low risk types have been associated with warts.


Q: Are people with genital HPV at a higher risk to contract other STIs, including HIV?

GQ:  We again did not examine this in the current report, but based on prior research, we know that men who have HIV and men who have sex with men are at particular risk for anal, penile and throat cancers due to persistent HPV infection.


Q: What are the current recommendations for HPV vaccine?

GQ:  According to Dr. Lauri Markowitz with the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC recommends two doses of HPV vaccine for 11 and 12 year olds to prevent HPV cancers. Younger adolescents need fewer doses to complete the HPV vaccination series compared to older adolescents. The first dose is recommended at 11-12 years old. Vaccination can be started at age 9. The second dose of the vaccine should be administered 6 to 12 months after the first dose. Teens and young adults who start the series at ages 15 through 26 years need three doses of HPV vaccine to protect against cancer-causing HPV infections. Adolescents aged 9 through 14 years who have already received two doses of HPV vaccine less than 5 months apart, will require a third dose. Three doses are recommended for people with weakened immune systems aged 9-26 years. Here’s a link to the press release that describes the changes: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p1020-hpv-shots.html


Q: What other findings in your report did you find striking?

GQ:  That among all race/ethnic groups males were significantly more likely to be infected with oral HPV except for high risk HPV among Asian adults.


Confidentiality Concerns and Sexual and Reproductive Health Care Among Adolescents and Young Adults Aged 15–25

December 16, 2016

Confidentiality concerns can impact adolescent and young adults’ access to sexual and reproductive health services. Young people who are covered by their parents’ private health insurance may be deterred from obtaining these services due to concerns that their parents might find out about it.  Similarly, confidentiality concerns may arise because youth seeking such services may not have time alone during a visit with a health care provider.

A new NCHS report describes two measures related to confidentiality concerns and sexual and reproductive health care.

Findings:

  • About 7% of persons aged 15–25 would not seek sexual or reproductive health care because of concerns that their parents might find out about it.
  • For females aged 15–17 and 18–25, those who had confidentiality concerns were less likely to receive sexual and reproductive health services in the past year compared with those without these concerns.
  • Less than one-half of teenagers aged 15–17 (38.1%) spent some time alone in the past year during a visit with a doctor or other health care provider without a parent, relative, or guardian in the room.
  • Teenagers aged 15–17 who spent some time alone during a visit with a health care provider were more likely to have received sexual or reproductive health services in the past year compared with those who had not.

 

 


Trends in Attitudes About Marriage, Childbearing, and Sexual Behavior: United States

March 17, 2016

An NCHS report describes attitudes about marriage, childbearing, and sexual behavior among men and women aged 15–44 in the United States based on the 2002, 2006–2010, and 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth.

Findings:

  • An increase in the percentage of men and women who agreed with premarital cohabitation.
  • An increase in the percentage of men and women who agreed with nonmarital childbearing.
  • An increase in the percentage of men and women who agreed with the right for gay and lesbian adults to adopt children.
  • An increase in the percentage of men and women who agreed with the right for same-sex sexual relations, as well as premarital sex for 18 year olds.
  • A decrease in the percentage who agreed with divorce.
  • No change from 2006-2010 to 2011-2013 in attitudes regarding marriage, cohabitation and the risk of divorce.
  • No change in attitudes about the necessity of having children for one’s happiness.
  • No change in attitudes about raising children in a cohabiting union.
  • No change in attitudes about premarital sex for 16 year olds.

Sexual Behavior, Sexual Attraction, and Sexual Orientation Among Adults Aged 18–44 in the United States

January 12, 2016

An NCHS report provides national estimates of sexual behavior, sexual attraction, and sexual orientation among women and men aged 18–44 in the United States, based on the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth.

Findings:

  • Regarding opposite-sex sexual behavior, 94.2% of women and 92% of men aged 18–44 had ever had vaginal intercourse.
  • 86.2% of women and 87.4% of men had ever had oral sex; and 35.9% of women and 42.3% of men had ever had
    anal sex.
  • Almost three times as many women (17.4%) reported any same-sex contact in their lifetime compared with men (6.2%) aged 18–44.
  • Feelings of attraction “only to the opposite sex” were more common for men (92.1%) compared with women
    (81%) aged 18–44. Among those aged 18–44, 92.3% of women and 95.1% of men said they were “heterosexual or straight”; 1.3% of women and 1.9% of men said they were “homosexual, gay, or lesbian”; 5.5% of women and 2.0% of men said they were bisexual; and 0.9% of women and 1% of men said “don’t know” or “refused” (i.e., “did not report”) on sexual orientation.
  • Sexual attraction and sexual orientation correlate closely but not completely with reports of sexual behavior. Sexual behavior, sexual attraction, and sexual orientation vary by age, marital or cohabiting status, education, and race and Hispanic origin.

Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing of Teenagers Aged 15–19 in the United States

July 22, 2015

Monitoring sexual activity and contraceptive use among U.S. adolescents is important for understanding differences in their risk of pregnancy. In 2013, the U.S. birth rate for teenagers aged 15–19 dropped 57% from its peak in 1991, paralleling a decline in the teen pregnancy rate. But these rates are still higher than those in other developed countries.

Using data from the 1988 to 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth, this report provides trends and recent national estimates of sexual activity, contraceptive use, and childbearing among teenagers aged 15–19.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2011–2013, 44% of female teenagers and 47% of male teenagers aged 15–19 had experienced sexual intercourse; the percentage has declined significantly, by 14% for female and 22% for male teenagers, over the past 25 years.
  • In the early teen years males were more likely than females to have had sexual intercourse. But the percentage of older teenagers who had sexual intercourse was similar for female and male teenagers.
  • In 2011–2013, 79% of female teenagers and 84% of male teenagers used a contraceptive method at first sexual intercourse.
  • The condom remained the most common contraceptive method used among teenagers.
  • Young women who did not use a method of contraception at first sexual intercourse were twice as likely to become teen mothers as those who used a method.

 


Report card for Nation’s health focuses on young adults aged 18-29

February 18, 2009
Young adults in the United States aged 18-29 face a number of health challenges, including increases in obesity, high injury rates, and a lack of insurance coverage compared to other adults, according to the latest report on the nation’s health from NCHS.
  • Obesity rates have tripled among young adults in the past three decades, rising from 8 percent in 1971-74 to 24 percent in 2005-06.
  • In 2006, 29 percent of young men were current cigarette smokers compared to 21 percent of young adult women.  
  • In 2005, unintentional injuries (‘‘accidents’’), homicide, and suicide accounted for 70 percent of deaths among young adults 18–29 years of age. Three-quarters of the 47,000 deaths in this age group occurred among young men. 
  • In 2006, young adults aged 20–24 were more likely to be uninsured (34 percent) than those aged 18–19 (21 percent) and those aged 25–29 (29 percent). 

    For more visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf.


America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being

July 19, 2007

Last Friday we released the 10th anniversary edition of America’s Children, a product of the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics.

The Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics (Forum) is a collection of 22 Federal government agencies involved in research and activities related to children and families. The Forum was founded in 1994 and formally established in April 1997 under Executive Order No. 13045. The mission of the Forum is to foster coordination and collaboration and to enhance and improve consistency in the collection and reporting of Federal data on children and families. The Forum also aims to improve the reporting and dissemination of information on the status of children and families.

Quite a bit of media interest was generated (here | here) on the subject of teen sexual behavior but there was much more to the report. The full report is available here and our overview of the data on health indicators which we contributed to is below the fold.

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