State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm

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Births: Final Data for 2015

January 5, 2017

Questions for Joyce A. Martin, M.P.H., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author on “Births: Final Data for 2015

Q: Was there a result in your study’s analysis of births in the United States that you hadn’t expected and that really surprised you?

JM: Although small, (from 9.57% to 9.63%) the rise in the preterm birth rate (births of less than 37 completed weeks of gestation) was unexpected. This rate had been declining steadily since 2007.

Also of note is the decline in the triplet and higher-order multiple birth rate, down 9% from 2014 to 2015, and a decrease of 46% since 1998. The year 2015 also is the third straight year of declines in the rate of cesarean delivery (rate of 32.0% in 2015).

The continued, large decline in the teen birth rate (down 8% from 2014 to 2015) was also somewhat surprising, although not unprecedented. From 2007 through 2014, the teen birth rates had declined 7% annually.


Q: What is the difference between this new births report and the other reports your office produced on 2015 birth data, like the preliminary data report on 2015 births and the Data Brief on teen births?

JM: The annual report “Births: Final Data for 2015” offers substantially more detail (e.g., age, race and Hispanic origin of mother, state) on key topics, than does the report on preliminary birth statistics (“Births: Preliminary Data for 2015”). The final report also includes information on topics not included in the preliminary reports such as multiple births, attendant and place of birth, birth order and birth rates for fathers.


Q: How has the number of births in the United States changed in 2015 from previous years?

JM: The number of births in the United States declined slightly in 2015 (by 9,579 births to 3,978,497) from 2014. The decline for 2015 followed an increase in births for 2014, which was the first increase since 2007.


Q: What differences, if any, did you see among race and ethnic groups, and among various ages?

JM: Of continued concern are the higher risks of poor birth outcomes as measured by levels of preterm birth and low birthweight among non-Hispanic black mothers compared with total births and other race and Hispanic origin groups. For example, in 2015 the preterm birth rate for births to non-Hispanic black mothers was more than 50% higher at 13.41% than for non-Hispanic white women (8.88%) and nearly 50% higher than the rate for births to Hispanic mothers (9.14%).


Q: Did you observe any regional or state differences in this study on births?

JM: Differences by state were observed for many of the demographic and medical/health items included in the 2015 final birth report. For example, from 2014 to 2015, the general fertility rate–which is the number of births per 1,000 women aged 15–44–declined in eight states and was essentially unchanged in the 42 states and the District of Columbia (DC). In 2015, the general fertility rate ranged among states from 51.1 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44 in Vermont to 78.2 in South Dakota.

Also, increases in preterm birth rates were limited to four states from 2014 to 2015: Arkansas, California, Nebraska, and North Carolina. Rates declined in four states: Montana, New York, Texas and Wyoming. Nonsignificant differences were reported for the remaining states and DC.


Q & A from Lead Author of “State Variation in Electronic Sharing of Information in Physician Offices: United States, 2015”

October 28, 2016
Eric Jamoom, Research Scientist Officer

Eric Jamoom, Research Scientist Officer

Questions for Eric Jamoom, Research Scientist Officer at the Collaborating Center for Questionnaire Design and Evaluation Research and Lead Author on “State Variation in Electronic Sharing of Information in Physician Offices: United States, 2015.”

Q: What findings in the report surprised you and why?

EJ: In this data brief, we are capturing for the first time four elements for measuring the electronic sharing of health information. Specifically, we now have insight into the number of office-based physicians that electronically sent, received, integrated and searched for patient health information from other providers.

Coupled with the recent release of a September 2, 2016 MMWR Quickstat that provided estimates on the number of physicians having electronic access to patient health information at the point of care, information is now available about the state of electronic information sharing by office-based physicians in the United States.


Q: How many office-based physicians electronically sent, received, integrated or searched for patient health information from other providers in 2015?

EJ: In 2015, roughly one-third of physicians indicated they either electronically sent, received, integrated, or searched patient health information in 2015.

Specifically, 38.2% of physicians had electronically sent patient health information to other providers, 38.3% of physicians had electronically received patient health information from other providers, 31.1% of physicians had electronically integrated patient health information from other providers, and 34.0% of physicians had electronically searched for patient health information from other providers.


Q: Which states did you find that electronically sent patient health information to other providers that were higher and lower than the national average?

EJ: In 2015, the percentage of physicians that sent patient health information to other providers ranged from 19.4% in Idaho to 56.3% in Arizona. Arizona was significantly greater than the national percentage, while three states – Idaho, New Jersey, and Connecticut – were significantly less than the national percentage.


Q: Can you explain what you found from state variation among physicians who had electronically searched for information from other providers?

EJ: In 2015, 34% of physicians had electronically searched for patient health information from other providers, ranging from 15.1% in the District of Columbia to 61.2% in Oregon. Five states, which include Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Mississippi, and Pennsylvania, as well as the District of Columbia were significantly less than the national percentage. Whereas, 10 states were significantly greater than the national percentage: Alaska, Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Wisconsin, Ohio, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware.


Q: Do you have trend data that goes further back than 2015 on this topic?

EJ: These data represent new information previously not available before on electronic information sharing of patient health information. Therefore, the information contained in this report represents a baseline for which future data can be used for trend data on these four elements of electronic information sharing among office-based physicians.


Q: Why did you decide to study state variation in electronic sharing of information in physician offices?

EJ: The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act provided financial incentives to eligible providers to demonstrate the meaningful use of a certified electronic health record (EHR) system, which also includes capacity to share patient health information.

In 2015, a federal plan was published to enhance the nation’s health IT infrastructure to support sending, receiving, integrating, and searching for patient health information electronically. The 2015 data from the National Electronic Health Records Survey provides national and state based estimates about physician EHR adoption and use.

 


State Variation in Electronic Sharing of Information in Physician Offices: United States, 2015

October 27, 2016

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) provides financial incentives to eligible providers using a certified electronic health record (EHR) system.

In 2015, 77.9% of office-based physicians had a certified EHR system, up from 74.1% in 2014. A federal plan to enhance the nation’s health information technology infrastructure was published in 2015 to support information sharing.

A new NCHS report uses the 2015 National Electronic Health Records Survey to describe the extent to which physicians can electronically send, receive, integrate, and search for patient health information.

Findings:

  • In 2015, the percentage of physicians who had electronically sent patient health information ranged from 19.4% in Idaho to 56.3% in Arizona.
  • In 2015, the percentage of physicians who had electronically received patient health information ranged from 23.6% in Louisiana
    and Mississippi to 65.5% in Wisconsin.
  • In 2015, the percentage of physicians who had electronically integrated patient health information from other providers ranged from 18.4% in Alaska to 49.3% in Delaware.
  • In 2015, the percentage of physicians who had electronically searched for patient health information ranged from 15.1% in the
    District of Columbia to 61.2% in Oregon.

QuickStats: Percentage of Physicians Who Have Electronic Access to Patient Health Information from Outside Their Medical Practice by State

September 2, 2016

In 2015, approximately half (50.3%) of the physicians in the United States had information from other providers outside of their practice electronically available at the point of care.

There was wide variation by state, ranging from 34.6% in Idaho to 76.4% in South Dakota.

Sixteen states and the District of Columbia were in the range with the lowest percentage of physicians with electronic access to more comprehensive patient information (34.6%–47.2%).

Another 16 states were in the middle range (47.3%–57%). The 18 states with the highest percentage of physicians having such information electronically available were in the top range (57.1%– 76.4%).

LINK: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6534a7.htm?s_cid=mm6534a7_e


State Variation in Health Care Service Utilization: United States, 2014

May 5, 2016

State-level differences in the percentage of uninsured Americans, along with other factors, may affect health care access and utilization.

An NCHS report examines the prevalence of two health care utilization measures among adults aged 18–64 by state. Additionally, differences by Medicaid expansion status and state Health Insurance Marketplace type are examined.

Findings: 

  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care ranged from 2.8% in Vermont to 26.7% in Nevada.
  • The percentage of adults who did not have a general doctor visit in the past 12 months ranged from 15.9% in Vermont to 48.1% in Montana.
  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care was lower in states that expanded Medicaid compared with nonexpansion states.
  • The percentage of adults without a usual place of medical care or who did not see a general doctor in the past 12 months was lower in states with partnership marketplaces compared with Federally Facilitated Marketplace states.

New Stats of the States Navigational Map

August 20, 2015

Click on map for individual state data in PDF format.

Stats of the States