QuickStats: Death Rates for Motor Vehicle Traffic Injury, Suicide, and Homicide Among Children and Adolescents aged 10–14 Years — United States, 1999–2014

November 4, 2016

In 1999, the mortality rate for children and adolescents aged 10–14 years for deaths from motor vehicle traffic injury (4.5 per 100,000) was about four times higher than the rate for deaths for suicide and homicide (both at 1.2).

From 1999 to 2014, the death rate for motor vehicle traffic injury declined 58%, to 1.9 in 2014 (384 deaths).

From 1999 to 2007, the death rate for suicide fluctuated and then doubled from 2007 (0.9) to 2014 (2.1, 425 deaths).

The death rate for homicide gradually declined to 0.8 in 2014. In 2013 and 2014, the differences between death rates for motor vehicle traffic injury and suicide were not statistically significant.

Sourcehttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6543a8.htm


Increase in Suicide in the United States, 1999–2014

April 22, 2016

Suicide is an important public health issue involving psychological, biological, and societal factors. After a period of nearly consistent decline in suicide rates in the United States from 1986 through 1999, suicide rates have increased almost steadily from 1999 through 2014.

While suicide among adolescents and young adults is increasing and among the leading causes of death for those demographic groups, suicide among middle-aged adults is also rising.

A new NCHS report presents an overview of suicide mortality in the United States from 1999 through 2014. Suicide rates in 1999 are compared with 2014 for both females and males across age groups, and percentages are compared by method (firearms, poisoning, suffocation, and other means).

Findings:

  • From 1999 through 2014, the age-adjusted suicide rate in the United States increased 24%, from 10.5 to 13.0 per 100,000 population, with the pace of increase greater after 2006.
  • Suicide rates increased from 1999 through 2014 for both males and females and for all ages 10–74.
  • The percent increase in suicide rates for females was greatest for those aged 10–14, and for males, those aged 45–64.
  • The most frequent suicide method in 2014 for males involved the use of firearms (55.4%), while poisoning was the most frequent method for females (34.1%).
  • Percentages of suicides attributable to suffocation increased for both sexes between 1999 and 2014.

 


Racial and Gender Disparities in Suicide Among Young Adults Aged 18–24: United States, 2009–2013

October 1, 2015

Suicide is an act of violence against oneself, resulting in death. Among teenagers and young adults aged 15–24, suicide was the second leading cause of death in 2013. Because patterns of suicide may be different for young adults aged 18–24 than for teens aged 15–17, a new NCHS Health E-Stat examines suicide rates and methods among young adults aged 18–24, by sex and race and Hispanic origin, using recent mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System.

In 2012–2013, young adult males aged 18–24 were more likely than young adult females to commit suicide. This relationship was found for the five race and ethnicity groups studied (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, Asian or Pacific Islander [API], and American Indian or Alaska Native [AIAN]). The suicide rate was highest in the AIAN population for both males and females (34.3 and 9.9 deaths per 100,000 population, respectively). AIAN males were more than twice as likely to commit suicide as most other gender and racial and ethnic subgroups. Suicide rates for AIAN young adults are likely to be underestimated; a previous study found that deaths overall for the AIAN population were underreported by 30%.

Based on combined data from 2009 through 2013 for non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white young adults who committed suicide, firearms was the most common method used, followed by suffocation. For Hispanic, API, and AIAN young adults who committed suicide, suffocation was the most common method used, followed by firearms. Poisoning and falls were more common methods among API young adults who committed suicide (12.6% and 8.1% of suicide deaths, respectively) than among other race and ethnicity groups.


Fact or Fiction: The Mountain West subregion of the U.S. has the highest suicide rate in the nation

September 11, 2015


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rates for Suicide by Urbanization of County of Residence— United States, 2004 and 2013

April 21, 2015

 

The overall age-adjusted suicide rate was 11.0 deaths per 100,000 population in the United States in 2004 and 12.6 in 2013.

From 2004 to 2013, the suicide rate increased in all county urbanization categories, with the smallest increase (7%) in large central metropolitan counties and the largest increases in small metropolitan, town/city (micropolitan) and rural counties (approximately 20% in each).

For both years, suicide rates were increasingly higher as counties became less urbanized. For 2013, the age-adjusted suicide rate in rural counties was 1.7 times the rate for large central metropolitan counties (17.6 compared with 10.3 deaths per 100,000).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6414a9.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Suicide Rates, by State — United States, 2012

November 17, 2014

In 2012, the overall age-adjusted suicide rate in the United States was 12.6 per 100,000 population. Among states, Wyoming had the highest suicide rate (29.6), followed by Alaska (23.0), Montana (22.6), New Mexico (21.3), and Utah (21.0). The District of Columbia had the lowest suicide rate (5.7), followed by New Jersey (7.4), New York (8.3), Massachusetts (8.7), and Rhode Island (9.5). For 34 states, suicide rates were higher than the overall U.S. rate. In 2012, a total of 40,600 suicides were reported in the United States.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6345a10.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Suicide Deaths by Mechanism and Age Group — United States, 2011

September 29, 2014

In 2011, firearm was the leading mechanism for suicide deaths for all age groups, ranging from 44% of suicides among persons aged 5–24 years to 72% of suicides among persons aged 65 years or older. Suffocation was the second leading mechanism in the two younger age groups (41% of suicides among persons aged 5–24 years and 32% of suicides among persons aged 25–44 years). In contrast, poisoning was the second leading mechanism (22%) among adults aged 45–64 years and those aged 65 years or older (8%).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6338a8.htm