QuickStats: Homicide and Suicide† Death Rates for Persons Aged 15–19 Years — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–201

June 8, 2018

In 1999, the homicide death rate for persons aged 15–19 years (10.4 per 100,000) was higher than the suicide rate (8.0). By 2010–2011, the homicide and suicide rates had converged.

After 2011, the suicide rate increased to 10.0 in 2016; the homicide rate declined through 2013 but then increased to 8.6 in 2016.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. 1999–2016. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6722a7.htm

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QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Suicide Rates by Race/Ethnicity — United States, 2015–2016

April 16, 2018

From 2015 to 2016, the age-adjusted suicide rate for the total U.S. population increased from 13.3 per 100,000 standard population to 13.5 (an increase of 1.5%).

The rate increased from 5.8 to 6.3 (8.6%) for non-Hispanic blacks and from 6.2 to 6.7 (8.1%) for Hispanics; it remained unchanged for non-Hispanic whites.

In both 2015 and 2016, the non-Hispanic white rate was nearly three times the non-Hispanic black rate and 2.5 times the rate for the Hispanic population.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Underlying cause of death data, 1999–2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6714a6.htm


Stat of the Day – December 20, 2017

December 20, 2017


Health, United States Spotlight Infographics – December 2017

December 13, 2017

A new Health, United States Spotlight Infographic from the National Center for Health Statistics is now available online. This infographic features data on teenage childbearing, tobacco use, suicide deaths and obesity.

Health, United States Spotlights are infographics of selected health data available in Health, United States, the annual report on the health of the nation sub

mitted by the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to the President and Congress.

Content includes selected indicators on important public health issues from the report’s four subject areas: health status and determinants, utilization of health resources, health care resources, and health care expenditures and payers. Like the report, the Spotlights display the most current data available and, where possible, trends over a ten-year period.

For some indicators, a different set of data years or combined years of data may be shown, depending on survey cycles and design changes. Data sources are identified for each health indicator to enable further exploration and include data systems from both the National Center for Health Statistics and partnering government and private agencies. Changes over time and differences among groups are presented using standard statistical techniques used in Health, United States.

Each Spotlight displays approximately four health indicators allowing users to visualize and interpret complex information from different data systems and Health, United States subject areas. Multiple infographics will be released throughout the year to spotlight important and relevant health data from Health, United States.

For more information on past and present infographics, please visit: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/hus/hus_infographic.htm.


Stat of the Day – September 14, 2017

September 14, 2017


QuickStats: Suicide Rates for Teens Aged 15–19 Years, by Sex — United States, 1975–2015

August 7, 2017

The suicide rate for males aged 15–19 years increased from 12.0 to 18.1 per 100,000 population from 1975 to 1990, declined to 10.8 by 2007, and then increased 31% to 14.2 by 2015.

The rate in 2015 for males was still lower than the peak rates in the mid- 1980s to mid-1990s.

Rates for females aged 15–19 were lower than for males aged 15–19 but followed a similar pattern during 1975–2007 (increasing from 2.9 to 3.7 from 1975 to 1990, followed by a decline from 1990 to 2007).

The rates for females then doubled from 2007 to 2015 (from 2.4 to 5.1). The rate in 2015 was the highest for females for the 1975–2015 period.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6630a6.htm


QuickStats: Average Number of Deaths from Motor Vehicle Injuries, Suicide, and Homicide by Day of the Week

June 12, 2017

In 2015, an average of 103 motor vehicle injury deaths, 121 suicides, and 49 homicides occurred each day.

Motor vehicle injury deaths were more likely to occur on Saturdays and Sundays and least likely to occur on Tuesdays.

The highest number of suicides occurred on Mondays and Tuesdays and the lowest on Saturdays.

Homicides peaked on Sundays, followed by Saturdays; homicides were less likely to occur on weekdays.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6622a5.htm