State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm


Health Insurance Data from the National Health Interview Survey

September 16, 2016

The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957 and collects data on a broad range of health topics through personal household interviews. NHIS has collected health insurance data periodically since 1959 and annually since 1989. The NHIS health insurance questions have changed and expanded over time to reflect changes in health insurance coverage as well as questionnaire design. Since 1997, the content and flow of the health insurance section has remained relatively stable, incorporating new programs where necessary. For example, new questions added in 2014 obtain information about whether coverage was obtained through the Federal Health Insurance Marketplace and state-based exchanges.

The NHIS allows for both point-in-time uninsured estimates as well as full-year and part-year uninsured estimates. Three estimates of lack of health insurance coverage are published for each calendar quarter: (a) uninsured at the time of interview, (b) uninsured at least part of the year prior to interview (which includes persons uninsured for more than a year), and (c) uninsured for more than a year at the time of interview. In addition, NHIS provides estimates of both public and private coverage as well as enrollment in high-deductible health plans and exchange-based coverage. The NHIS may be used to monitor changes in health insurance coverage throughout the year as the survey is fielded continuously throughout the year.

To see the latest quarterly numbers on health insurance coverage through January-March 2016, check out: Health Insurance Coverage: Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-March 2016, released on September 7, 2016.


Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-March 2016

September 7, 2016

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Questions for Robin Cohen, Ph.D., Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January-March 2016

Q: How have trends in health insurance coverage in the United States changed in the first quarter of 2016 compared to last year, and compared to 2010 when the Affordable Care Act was established?

RC: In the first 3 months of 2016, 27.3 million — or 8.6 percent of persons of all ages — were uninsured. This is 1.3 million fewer persons than in 2015 and 21.3 million fewer persons than in 2010. In 2015, the uninsured rate is in the single digits for the first time since the National Health Interview Survey began measuring health insurance in 1959.

Also, from January through March 2016, among adults aged 18 to 64, 11.9 percent were uninsured at the time of interview, 19.5 percent had public coverage, and 70.2 percent had private health insurance coverage. Among the 138.2 million adults in this age group with private coverage, 9.2 million or 4.7 percent were covered by private health insurance plans obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges.


Q: What explains the drop in the uninsured rate during the first quarter of 2016, after the rate was essentially unchanged during the last three periods for 2015?

RC: The estimates for the previous three reports are based on an average over 6 months, 9 months, and 12 months of data for the November 2015, February 2016, and May 2016 reports respectively.


Q: How is health insurance coverage looking this year for our youngest population – children under 18 years of age?

RC: In the first quarter of 2016, 5 percent of children under 18 years of age were uninsured; 42.1 percent had public coverage, and 54.9 percent had private coverage. The percentage of children who were uninsured decreased from 13.9 percent in 1997 to 5 percent in the first 3 months of 2016.


Q: Where do high-deductible plans through private health insurance fit into 2016 estimates compared to earlier years?

RC: Forty percent of persons under age 65 with private health insurance were enrolled in a high-deductible health plan in the first 3 months of 2016. The percentage who were enrolled in a high deductible health plan increased almost 15 percentage points from 25.3 percent in 2010 to 40 percent in 2016’s first quarter. More recently, the percentage enrolled in a high-deductible plan increased from 36.7 percent in 2015 to 40 percent in 2016.


Q: What are the trends among race and ethnicity groups in health insurance coverage this year and compared over time?

RC: In the first 3 months of 2016, 24.5 percent of Hispanic, 13 percent of non-Hispanic black, 8.4 percent of non-Hispanic white, and 6.7 percent of non-Hispanic Asian adults aged 18 to 64 lacked health insurance coverage. There were significant decreases in the percentage of uninsured adults observed between 2015 and the first 3 months of 2016 among these four race and ethnicity groups. Hispanic adults had the greatest percentage point decrease of 16.1 percentage points in the uninsured rate between 2013 and the first 3 months of 2016.


Number of Uninsured in U.S. Continues to Decline

November 6, 2015

NCHS has released selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the January–June 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), along with comparable estimates from the 2010–2014 NHIS.

Key Findings:

  • In the first 6 months of 2015, 28.5 million persons of all ages (9%) were uninsured at the time of interview—7.5 million fewer persons than in 2014 and 16.3 million fewer than in 2013.
  • Among adults aged 18–64, the percentage uninsured decreased from 16.3% in 2014 to 12.7% in the first 6 months of 2015. There was a corresponding increase in private coverage, from 67.3% to 70.6%. In 2013, among adults aged 18–64, 20.4% were uninsured and 64.2% had private coverage.
  • Among children under age 18 years, the percentage with private coverage increased from 52.6% in 2013 to 56.0% in the first 6 months of 2015, reversing a 14-year trend of declining rates of private coverage.
  • Among those under age 65, the percentage with private coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges increased from 2.5% (6.7 million) in the fourth quarter of 2014 to 4.0% (10.7 million) in the second quarter

Insurance Status by State Medicaid Expansion Status: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2013–September 2014

May 21, 2015

Under the Affordable Care Act, states have the option to expand Medicaid coverage to all eligible persons with incomes up to 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL). Previous research has shown that there have already been significant decreases in the percentages of persons who were uninsured between 2013 and the first 9 months of 2014.

Using data from 2013 and the second and third quarters (April through September) of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a new NCHS report examines changes in the percentage of persons who were uninsured, by state Medicaid expansion status, age, and poverty status.

Data from the second and third quarters of the 2014 NHIS were chosen for this analysis because they capture the surge in enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace and state-based exchange plans that occurred in March and the beginning of April 2014. Data from the fourth quarter of the 2014 NHIS are not yet available.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The percentage of adults aged 18–64 who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 20.4% in 2013 to 15.9% in April–September 2014.
  • Adults aged 18–64 with family incomes less than or equal to 138% of the FPL in Medicaid expansion states had a larger decrease in the percentage uninsured (10.2 percentage points) than those with similar income in nonexpansion states (3.3 percentage points) from 2013 to April–September 2014.
  • Between 2013 and April–September 2014, the percentage of uninsured adults aged 18–34 with incomes less than or equal to 138% FPL decreased 9.1 percentage points in Medicaid expansion states, compared with only 0.7 percentage points in nonexpansion states.
  • The greatest absolute decrease in the percentage uninsured from 2013 to April–September 2014 (12.1 percentage points) was among adults aged 45–64 with incomes less than or equal to 138% FPL in Medicaid expansion states.

 


How’s your state doing?

December 16, 2009

NCHS now has an easy way for you to check out where your state stands on a variety of health measures compared with the nation as a whole and other states, including the following:

  • Mortality from leading causes of death
  • Birth data, including births to unmarried mothers, teen births, cesarean deliveries, low birthweight births, prenatal care, and preterm births
  • Households using only wireless phones
  • Infant mortality rates
  • Marriage and divorce rates
  • Percentage of people under 65 without health insurance

To use this tool, click on the image below.


Report card for Nation’s health focuses on young adults aged 18-29

February 18, 2009
Young adults in the United States aged 18-29 face a number of health challenges, including increases in obesity, high injury rates, and a lack of insurance coverage compared to other adults, according to the latest report on the nation’s health from NCHS.
  • Obesity rates have tripled among young adults in the past three decades, rising from 8 percent in 1971-74 to 24 percent in 2005-06.
  • In 2006, 29 percent of young men were current cigarette smokers compared to 21 percent of young adult women.  
  • In 2005, unintentional injuries (‘‘accidents’’), homicide, and suicide accounted for 70 percent of deaths among young adults 18–29 years of age. Three-quarters of the 47,000 deaths in this age group occurred among young men. 
  • In 2006, young adults aged 20–24 were more likely to be uninsured (34 percent) than those aged 18–19 (21 percent) and those aged 25–29 (29 percent). 

    For more visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf.