QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Males Aged 15–44 Years, by the Five Leading Causes of Death — United States, 1999 and 2014

August 12, 2016

The age-adjusted death rate for males aged 15–44 years was 10% lower in 2014 (156.6 per 100,000 population) than in 1999 (174.1).

Among the five leading causes of death, the age-adjusted rates for three were lower in 2014 than in 1999: cancer (from 17.1 to 12.8; 25% decline), heart disease (20.1 to 17.0; 15% decline), and homicide (15.7 to 13.8; 12% decline).

The age-adjusted death rates for two of the five causes were higher in 2014 than in 1999: suicide (20.1 to 22.5; 12% increase), and unintentional injuries (from 48.7 to 51.0; 5% increase).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6531a8.htm


Most dangerous states to be riding in a car this holiday weekend

November 25, 2009

Are you driving to your Thanksgiving dinner this weekend? Beware that your risk while rolling down the highway may be higher or lower depending on the state in which you are traveling. When it comes to dying in a car accident, some states are more deadly than others, and the ones at the top may surprise you. See the chart, Car Occupant Fatalities by State, 2006, below:


Increase in poisonings from opioid painkillers

October 1, 2009

NCHS recently released the report titled “Increase in Fatal Poisonings Involving Opioid Analgesics in the United States, 1999-2006.” This report shows the explosion of fatal poisonings from opioid painkillers over the past 7 years. For example, from 1999 through 2006, the number of fatal poisonings involving opioid analgesics more than tripled from 4,000 to 13,800 deaths. Opioid analgesics were involved in almost 40% of all poisoning deaths in 2006.The differences among states is also striking:


Age-adjusted death rates for poisonings involving opioid analgesics: Comparison of state and U.S. rates: United Stats, 2006

For more information, visit the report at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db22.htm.


Unintentional Injuries and Death

April 19, 2007

Every week the NCHS contributes a feathure called QuickStats to the CDC professional journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). For the week of April 6, 2007 the feature was entitled Percentage Change in Death Rates for the Leading Causes of Unintentional Injury, by Mechanism of Injury — United States, 1999–2004.

During 1999–2004, age-adjusted unintentional injury death rates increased 6.8%, from 35.3 per 100,000 population to 37.7. This increase was attributed primarily to increases in rates from motorcycle crashes, poisoning (including unintentional drug overdose), and falls. Similar but smaller increases were observed for these causes in 2003, thus the upward trend continued in 2004.


Firearms deaths

April 17, 2007

We are all horrified by the senseless murders at Virginia Tech at Blacksburg, VA. 

Historically, homicide has been the second leading cause of death among the young people of college agent following unintentional injuries.

Deaths from firearms among 18-22 year olds:

Year Deaths Rate
1999 2,442 12.54
2000 2,482 12.52
2001 2,614 12.82
2002 2,658 12.89
2003 2,694 13.01
2004 2,477 11.95

The CDC provides public use databases for fatal injuries and leading causes of death.