QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Males, Females and Both Sexes — United States, 2009–2018

August 7, 2020

During 2009–2018, the age-adjusted death rate in the United States generally declined, from 749.6 per 100,000 in 2009 to 723.6 in 2018.

The death rate among males declined from 2009 (890.9) to 2014 (855.1), increased in 2015 (863.2), and then remained relatively flat until 2018 (855.5).

Among females, the death rate declined steadily from 2009 (636.8) to 2018 (611.3). Throughout this period the death rate for males was higher than that for females.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, mortality data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6931a5.htm


QuickStats: Number of Natural Heat-Related Deaths by Sex and Age Group — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2018

July 31, 2020

In 2018, natural heat exposure was associated with 726 deaths among males and 282 deaths among females.

Among males, the highest number of heat-related deaths was for those aged 55–64 years (150) and among females for those aged 65–74 years (58).

The lowest numbers were for males (four) and females (two) aged 5–14 years. Approximately 72% of heat-related deaths were among males.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Multiple cause of death data, 1999–2018. https://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6930a6.htm


Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mortality Rate of Infants Born to Teen Mothers: United States, 2017–2018

July 31, 2020

Questions for Ashley Woodall, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Racial and Ethnic Differences in Mortality Rate of Infants Born to Teen Mothers: United States, 2017–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to focus on teenagers for this report?

AW: There has not been much research on infant mortality using national data that focuses on specific maternal age groups. Teenagers are an age group of particular interest because infants born to teenagers have higher infant mortality rates compared with infants born to women in older age groups. Consequently, we wanted to explore the recent patterns in infant mortality for teenagers in the United States.


Q: Can you summarize some of the findings?

AW: In 2017–2018, infants born to teenagers aged 15–19 had the highest rate of mortality (8.77 deaths per 1,000 live births) compared with infants born to women aged 20 and over. Among teenagers, infants of non-Hispanic black females had the highest infant mortality rate (12.54) compared with non-Hispanic white (8.43) and Hispanic (6.47) females. Among the five leading causes of infant death, the largest racial and ethnic difference in mortality rates was found for preterm- and low-birthweight-related causes, where rates were two to three times higher for infants of non-Hispanic black teenagers (284.31 per 100,000 live births) than infants of non-Hispanic white (119.18) and Hispanic (94.44) teenagers.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AW: We were surprised by the large racial and ethnic disparity in deaths for preterm- and low-birthweight-related causes. This finding suggests that preterm birth and low birthweight are significant contributing factors for death among infants born to non-Hispanic black teenagers.


Q: Can you explain the difference between total infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates?

AW: Infant mortality is the death of a baby before his or her first birthday. It is calculated by dividing the number of infant deaths during a calendar year by the number of live births reported in the same year. It is expressed as the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. Neonatal mortality rate is the death of a baby during the first 27 days after birth, per 1,000 live births. Postneonatal mortality rate is the death of a baby between 28 days to under 1 year after birth, per 1,000 live births.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AW: The different mortality patterns seen among infants born to teenage mothers illustrate the racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality and suggest that preterm birth and low birthweight are major public health concerns for infants born to non-Hispanic black teenagers.


Infant Mortality in the United States, 2018: Data From the Period Linked Birth/Infant Death File

July 16, 2020

Questions for Danielle Ely, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Infant Mortality in the United States, 2018: Data From the Period Linked Birth/Infant Death File.”

Q: Why does NCHS conduct studies on infant mortality?

DE: NCHS collects data from U.S. jurisdictions on infant deaths to provide national statistics on infant mortality. Infant mortality is considered a key public health indicator for a country.


Q: Can you explain what the Linked Birth/Infant Death File is?

DE: The linked file consists of infant death information linked with the birth certificate information for infants under 1 year of age. Individual birth and death records are selected from their respective files and linked into a single statistical record, thereby establishing a national linked record file. The linked birth/infant death data set is the preferred source for examining infant mortality by race and Hispanic origin. Infant mortality rates by race and Hispanic origin are more accurately measured from the birth certificate compared with the death certificate.


Q: Can you summarize how the infant mortality data varied?

DE: The U.S. infant mortality rate was 5.67 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, lower than the rate of 5.79 in 2017 and an historic low. The mortality rate declined in 2018 for infants of Hispanic women compared with the 2017 rate; changes in rates for other race and Hispanic-origin groups were not statistically significant. The 2018 infant mortality rate for infants of non-Hispanic black women (10.75) was more than twice as high as that for infants of non-Hispanic white (4.63), non-Hispanic Asian (3.63), and Hispanic women (4.86). Infants born very preterm (less than 28 weeks of gestation) had the highest mortality rate (382.20), 186 times as high as that for infants born at term (37–41 weeks of gestation) (2.05). Infant mortality rates by state for 2018 ranged from a low of 3.50 in New Hampshire to a high of 8.41 in Mississippi.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

DE: Although the infant mortality rate continues to slowly decline, some groups have consistently higher rates than others (for example, by maternal race and Hispanic origin, infants of non-Hispanic black, American Indian or Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander women have higher rates than infants of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic women). This information can further our understanding of current infant mortality trends and provide information on where improvements can be made.


Q: Any predictions for 2019 infant mortality data?

DE: We do not predict what will happen for the infant mortality rate in future years. Provisional estimates for each quarter can be found in the Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/infant-mortality-dashboard.htm. These data show a slight increase in the 2019 quarter 2 estimates to 5.69 infant deaths per 1,000 live births.  Note that this estimate may be revised when the 2018 quarter 3 estimate becomes available.


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru December 2019)

July 15, 2020

 

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


State Teen Birth Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017–2018

July 10, 2020

New NCHS report presents changes in state-specific birth rates for teenagers between 2017 and 2018 by race and Hispanic origin of mother.

Click to access NVSR69-6-508.pdf


Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017

June 25, 2020

Questions for Anne Driscoll, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017.”

Q: What is difference between maternal age distribution and maternal age-specific infant mortality rates?

AD: “Maternal age distribution” refers to the percentage of women with a birth in each maternal age category; for example, the percentage who are 15-19 years old, the percentage who are 20-24 years old. The “maternal age-specific infant mortality rate” is the mortality rate of infants born to women in a given maternal age category; for example, the mortality rate of infants born to women who were 20-24 years old.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AD: It was somewhat surprising that changes in maternal age distribution mattered little or not at all for the mortality trends for infants born to non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women given the significant changes in the maternal age distribution for both groups during the study period.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AD: The data are from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS); we used natality data sets and infant mortality data sets from 2000-2017. Natality data sets are comprised of information from all birth certificates in a given year; infant mortality data sets are comprised of information from all death certificates to persons under one year of age in a given year.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AD: Changes in the age distribution of women giving birth accounted for about one-third of the decline in infant mortality rates from 2000 through 2017 while declines in maternal age-specific mortality rates accounted for about two-thirds of this decline. However, these patterns varied markedly by race and Hispanic origin.


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru November 2019)

June 17, 2020

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Quickstats: Cancer and Heart Disease Death Rates Among Men and Women Aged 45–64 Years — United States, 1999–2018

May 29, 2020

The cancer death rate for both men and women aged 45–64 years declined steadily from 247.0 per 100,000 in 1999 to 194.9 in 2018 for men and from 204.1 to 166.3 for women.

The heart disease death rate for men declined from 1999 (235.7) to 2011 (183.5) but then increased to 192.9 in 2018. For women, the heart disease death rate declined from 1999 (96.8) to 2011 (74.9), increased through 2016 (80.3), and then leveled off.

In 2018, the cancer death rate for men aged 45–64 years was 1% higher than the heart disease death rate; for women, the cancer death rate was approximately twice the heart disease death rate.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6921a4.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Deaths, by Place of Death — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2000–2018

May 15, 2020

The percentage of deaths from all causes that occurred in a hospital decreased from 48.0% in 2000 to 35.1% in 2018.

During that period, the percentage of deaths that occurred in the decedent’s home increased from 22.7% to 31.4%, and the percentage that occurred in a long-term care facility (hospice, nursing home, long-term care) increased from 22.9% to 26.8%.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Underlying cause of death data, 2000–2018. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.