QuickStats: Homicide and Suicide† Death Rates for Persons Aged 15–19 Years — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 1999–201

June 8, 2018

In 1999, the homicide death rate for persons aged 15–19 years (10.4 per 100,000) was higher than the suicide rate (8.0). By 2010–2011, the homicide and suicide rates had converged.

After 2011, the suicide rate increased to 10.0 in 2016; the homicide rate declined through 2013 but then increased to 8.6 in 2016.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. 1999–2016. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6722a7.htm

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Recent Increases in Injury Mortality Among Children and Adolescents Aged 10–19 Years in the United States: 1999–2016

June 4, 2018

NCHS released a new report that presents numbers of injury deaths and death rates for children and adolescents aged 10–19 years in the United States for 1999–2016.

Numbers and rates are presented by sex for 1999–2016, by injury intent (e.g., unintentional, suicide, and homicide) and method (e.g., motor vehicle traffic, firearms, and suffocation). Numbers and rates of death according to leading injury intents and methods are shown by sex for ages 10–14 years and 15–19 years for 2016.

Findings:

  • The total death rate for persons aged 10–19 years declined 33% between 1999 (44.4 per 100,000 population) and 2013 (29.6) and then increased 12% between 2013 and 2016 (33.1).
  • This recent rise is attributable to an increase in injury deaths for persons aged 10–19 years during 2013–2016.
  • Increases occurred among all three leading injury intents (unintentional, suicide, and homicide) during 2013–2016.
  • Unintentional injury, the leading injury intent for children and adolescents aged 10–19 years in 2016, declined 49% between 1999 (20.6) and 2013 (10.6), and then increased 13% between 2013 and 2016 (12.0).
  • The death rate for suicide, the second leading injury intent among ages 10–19 years in 2016, declined 15% between 1999 and 2007 (from 4.6 to 3.9), and then increased 56% between 2007 and 2016 (6.1).
  • The death rate for homicide, the third leading intent of injury death in 2016, fluctuated and then declined 35% between 2007 (5.7) and 2014 (3.7) before increasing 27%, to 4.7 in 2016.

Births: Provisional Data for 2017

May 17, 2018

Questions for Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author of “Births: Provisional Data for 2017

Q: What did you think was the most interesting finding in your new analysis?

BH: The report includes a number of very interesting findings. The general fertility rate, 60.2 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44, declining 3% in 2017 and reaching a record low is certainly noteworthy. In addition, the continued decline in the birth rate for teens, down 7% from 2016 to in 2017, and reaching another record low, is very significant. The increase in the cesarean delivery rate following several years of decline is noteworthy as are the recent increase in rates of preterm and low birthweight births.


Q: Why does fertility keep going down in the U.S.?

BH: In general, there are a number of factors associated with fertility. The data on which the report is based comes from the birth certificates registered for births in the U.S. While the scope of this data is essentially all births in the country, and provides detailed information about rare events, small areas, or small population groups, the data does not provide information about the parent’s decision to have (or not have) a child. And so, accordingly, we cannot examine the “why” of the changes and trends in births.


Q: Does the decline in the Total Fertility Rate essentially mean fertility is down below “replacement” levels?  Could you explain this in general terms?

BH: “Replacement” refers to a minimum rate of reproduction necessary for generation to exactly replace itself, that is, enough children born to replace a group of 1,000 women and their partners. For the total fertility rate, this rate is generally considered to be 2,100 births per 1,000 women. In 2017, the total fertility rate, 1,764.5 births per 1,000 women, was below replacement.


Q: Do the increases among women over 40 suggest a “new norm” in people waiting till much later to have children?

BH: Birth rates for women aged 40-44 and 45-49 years have increased generally over the last 3 decades. Given this, it reasonable to expect this trend to continue.


Q: Are the annual declines in teen pregnancy something that we are in danger of taking for granted?

BH: The birth rate for females aged 15-19 has decreased 8% per year from 2007 through 2017. For comparison, the decline in the birth rates for women aged 20-24 and 25-29 was 4% and 2% from 2007 through 2017. The decline in teen births is very noteworthy.


Q: Can you explain how the increases in preterm births and low birthweight are connected?

BH: Infants born preterm are also often, but not exclusively, born low birthweight and vice-versa.  The causes of the recent upward shift in these rates are not well understood.


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Suicide Rates by Race/Ethnicity — United States, 2015–2016

April 16, 2018

From 2015 to 2016, the age-adjusted suicide rate for the total U.S. population increased from 13.3 per 100,000 standard population to 13.5 (an increase of 1.5%).

The rate increased from 5.8 to 6.3 (8.6%) for non-Hispanic blacks and from 6.2 to 6.7 (8.1%) for Hispanics; it remained unchanged for non-Hispanic whites.

In both 2015 and 2016, the non-Hispanic white rate was nearly three times the non-Hispanic black rate and 2.5 times the rate for the Hispanic population.

Source: National Vital Statistics System. Underlying cause of death data, 1999–2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6714a6.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Drug Overdose by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2015–2016

April 2, 2018

During 2015–2016, the age-adjusted death rates from drug overdose for the total population increased from 16.3 per 100,000 standard population to 19.8 (21.5%).

The rate increased from 21.1 to 25.3 (19.9%) for non-Hispanic whites, from 12.2 to 17.1 (40.2%) for non-Hispanic blacks, and from 7.7 to 9.5 (23.4%) for Hispanics.

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Underlying cause of death data, 1999–2016. https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6712a9.htm


Poisoning Deaths in U.S. from 1999-2016

March 19, 2018
Year
Deaths
1999
19,741
2000
20,230
2001
22,242
2002
26,435
2003
28,700
2004
30,308
2005
32,691
2006
37,286
2007
40,059
2008
41,080
2009
41,592
2010
42,917
2011
46,047
2012
46,150
2013
48,545
2014
51,966
2015
57,567
2016
68,995

Source: https://wonder.cdc.gov

Injury Mechanism & All Other Leading Causes: Poisoning

 


Births: Final Data for 2016

January 31, 2018

Questions for Joyce A. Martin, M.P.H., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author on, “Births: Final Data for 2016.”

Q: Are there any data that are new in this report compared with previous annual final birth reports?

JM: Yes!  This report includes new national data on a number of items including prenatal care utilization in the US, whether the mother received WIC food during pregnancy, cigarette smoking before and during pregnancy, maternal body mass index of overweight or obese, primary cesarean and vaginal birth after previous cesarean delivery and source of payment for the delivery.


Q: Is the U.S. birth rate going up or down in 2016?

JM: Both the number of births and the general fertility rate (births per 1,000 women aged 15-44) declined in the US from 2015 to 2016.


Q: Are teen births in the U.S. continuing to decline?

JM: Yes, the teen birth rate declined 9% from 2015 to another record low.


Q: What did the findings show for the mean age of U.S. mothers at first birth?

JM: The 2016 mean or average age of mothers having a first birth was a record high in 2016, at 26.6 years.


Q: What is the take home message in this report?

JM: Births are down overall and among women 15 to 29 years of age.  The cesarean delivery rate continued to decline but rates of preterm birth and low birthweight are on the rise.  Birth certificate data are a rich source for important information on mothers and their newborns.