U.S. Heart Attack Deaths from 2010-2015

February 15, 2017
Year
Deaths
2010
122,071
2011
119,905
2012
117,944
2013
116,793
2014
114,019
2015
114,023
TOTAL
704,755

 Source: http://wonder.cdc.gov

ICD-10: Acute myocardial infarction (I21-I22)

 


CDC WONDER Database

September 27, 2013

Do you want to know how many births or deaths were in your state during a particular year?  CDC has a database that can answer this question called CDC WONDER.  This an easy-to-use, menu-driven system that makes the information resources of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) available to public health professionals and the public at large. It provides access to a wide array of public health information.

What can you do with CDC WONDER?

  • Access statistical research data published by CDC, as well as reference materials, reports and guidelines on health-related topics;
  • Query numeric data sets on CDC’s computers, via “fill-in-the blank” web pages. Public-use data sets about mortality (deaths), cancer incidence, HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis, vaccinations, natality (births), census data and many other topics are available for query, and the requested data are readily summarized and analyzed, with dynamically calculated statistics, charts and maps.

The data is ready for use in desktop applications such as word processors, spreadsheet programs, or statistical and geographic analysis packages. File formats available include plain text (ASCII), web pages (HTML), and spreadsheet files (Tab Separated Values). All of these facilities are menu-driven, and require no special computer expertise.

How do you use CDC WONDER?

CDC WONDER presents you with an array of health related data sets. Each data set can be queried using a series of menus.

Document collections, such as CDC Prevention Guidelines, are presented in a topic list or table of contents. In some cases, a full text search option is available as well.

Statistical databases are presented in a series of “fill in the blanks” request forms. You fill in the forms to specify the criteria for your data request, and then send the request to be processed. The results of your query are usually returned within seconds. If the system is delayed processing your request, however, some queries allow you to retrieve your results later, or you can have them e-mailed to you.

When you receive your results in CDC WONDER, you can view them online and then, if you desire, save them on your personal computer so that you can load them into another program. For example, you can generate charts or maps of your data, and paste these images into word processor documents or presentations. If you request numeric data, you may wish to load the data into a spreadsheet or statistical analysis program. You can do so by clicking the “Export” button to generate a tab separated file for download. Some software support the ability to paste rows copied from the table displayed in the web page.

Please refer to Data Sets and Documentation for more information.

System Requirements

The CDC WONDER home page is located on the world wide web at http://wonder.cdc.gov/. Specific pages and forms within WONDER are linked to from many other sites on the web.

Most of CDC WONDER will work with most web browsers. To fully use CDC WONDER, however, you need a browser with Java Script enabled. WONDER works with Internet Explorer version 6 and above, and with the current version of Firefox (1.5 or above).

Who do I contact for questions?

For support and technical assistance with CDC WONDER, or to share your ideas and opinions, click here to contact our customer support team.


January is cervical cancer awareness month…

January 6, 2010

Cervical cancer once was the leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S., and although the cases and deaths of cervical cancer have decreased over the past 40 years due largely to regular Pap tests, the disease still was responsible for almost 4,000 deaths in 2006 (most recent data available). The rates vary somewhat, but not widely, by state. See how your area compares below.

Cervical death rates per 100,000 women, United States, 2006

For more information on cervical cancer, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/index.htm.

For more information on cancer mortality, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.


Most dangerous states to be riding in a car this holiday weekend

November 25, 2009

Are you driving to your Thanksgiving dinner this weekend? Beware that your risk while rolling down the highway may be higher or lower depending on the state in which you are traveling. When it comes to dying in a car accident, some states are more deadly than others, and the ones at the top may surprise you. See the chart, Car Occupant Fatalities by State, 2006, below:


Breast cancer deaths – A state-by-state basis

October 28, 2009

Except for skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women. However, in the United States, incidence of breast cancer has decreased significantly by 2.2% per year from 1999 to 2005 among women, and deaths from breast cancer have decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1998 to 2005 among women. However, age-adjusted death rates from breast cancer vary by state:

This map of the U.S. shows death rates for breast cancer by state.

For more trends and statistics by state, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_states.htm.

For more breast cancer statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/.


Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

July 5, 2007

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant less than one year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough case investigation is conducted, including a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history.

SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months, and is the third leading cause overall of infant mortality in the United States. Although the overall rate of SIDS in the United States has declined by more than 50% since 1990, rates have declined less among non-Hispanic Black and American Indian/Alaska Native infants. Preventing SIDS remains an important public health priority.

Data on SIDS from National Center for Health Statistics mortality reports document the decline of SIDS as a cause of death.


Deaths from HIV/AIDS

June 29, 2007

We had a question about the number of persons in the United States who die from HIV/AIDS.

Mortality data indicate that in 2004 5,608 whites (rate of 2.4 per 100,000), 7271 blacks (18.8 per 100,000), and 184 persons of other races (rate of 1.1 per 100,000) died of HIV/AIDS.

You can do your own analysis by year at CDC’s public access WONDER database (select ICD 10 codes B20-B24 in section 4) or you can quickly determine where HIV/AIDS ranks in the CDC’s WISQARS Leading Cause of Death Report.