Breast cancer deaths – A state-by-state basis

October 28, 2009

Except for skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women. However, in the United States, incidence of breast cancer has decreased significantly by 2.2% per year from 1999 to 2005 among women, and deaths from breast cancer have decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1998 to 2005 among women. However, age-adjusted death rates from breast cancer vary by state:

This map of the U.S. shows death rates for breast cancer by state.

For more trends and statistics by state, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_states.htm.

For more breast cancer statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/.


Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

July 5, 2007

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is defined as the sudden death of an infant less than one year of age that cannot be explained after a thorough case investigation is conducted, including a complete autopsy, examination of the death scene, and review of the clinical history.

SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants aged 1 to 12 months, and is the third leading cause overall of infant mortality in the United States. Although the overall rate of SIDS in the United States has declined by more than 50% since 1990, rates have declined less among non-Hispanic Black and American Indian/Alaska Native infants. Preventing SIDS remains an important public health priority.

Data on SIDS from National Center for Health Statistics mortality reports document the decline of SIDS as a cause of death.


Deaths from HIV/AIDS

June 29, 2007

We had a question about the number of persons in the United States who die from HIV/AIDS.

Mortality data indicate that in 2004 5,608 whites (rate of 2.4 per 100,000), 7271 blacks (18.8 per 100,000), and 184 persons of other races (rate of 1.1 per 100,000) died of HIV/AIDS.

You can do your own analysis by year at CDC’s public access WONDER database (select ICD 10 codes B20-B24 in section 4) or you can quickly determine where HIV/AIDS ranks in the CDC’s WISQARS Leading Cause of Death Report.