Drug Poisoning Mortality: United States, 1999-2015

April 19, 2017

The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has released a new data visualization storyboard that presents drug poisoning deaths from 1999 to 2015 at the national, state, and county levels.

The first two dashboards depict U.S. and state trends in age-adjusted death rates for drug poisoning from 1999 to 2015 by selected demographic characteristics, and the third dashboard presents a series of heat maps of model-based county estimates for drug poisoning mortality from 1999 to 2015.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data-visualization/drug-poisoning-mortality/


State by State Health Data Source Updated on NCHS Web Site

April 19, 2017

CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has updated its Stats of the States feature on the NCHS web site.  This resource features the latest state-by-state comparisons on key health indicators ranging from birth topics such as teen births and cesarean deliveries to leading causes of death and health insurance coverage.

Tabs have been added to the color-coded maps to compare trends on these topics between the most recent years (2015 and 2014) and going back a decade (2005) and in some cases further back.

To access the main “Stats of the States” page, use the following link:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm


QuickStats: Percentage Distribution of Gestational Age in Weeks for Infants Who Survived to Age 1 Year and Infants Who Died Before Age 1 Year — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2014

April 17, 2017

Infants who do not survive the first year of life are more likely to be born at earlier gestational ages.

In 2014, 66% of infants who survived to age 1 year were delivered at full term or later (≥39 completed weeks) compared with 16% of infants who died before reaching age 1 year.

Fifty-eight percent of infants who died before age 1 year were delivered at <32 weeks gestation compared with only 1% of infants who survived to age 1 year.

Sourcehttps://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6614a5.htm


United States Life Tables, 2013

April 11, 2017

A new NCHS report presents complete period life tables for the United States by race, Hispanic origin, and sex, based on age-specific death rates in 2013.

Findings:

  • In 2013, the overall expectation of life at birth was 78.8 years, unchanged from 2012.
  • Between 2012 and 2013, life expectancy at birth remained the same for both males (76.4) and females (81.2), for the black population (75.5), the Hispanic population (81.9), and the non-Hispanic black population (75.1).
  • Life expectancy at birth declined for both the white population (79.1 to 79.0) and the non-Hispanic white population (78.9 to 78.8).

QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates, by Race/Ethnicity — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2014–2015

April 10, 2017

From 2014 to 2015, the age-adjusted death rate for the total U.S. population increased 1.2% from 724.6 to 733.1 per 100,000 population.

The rate increased 0.6% from 870.7 to 876.1 for non-Hispanic blacks and 1.4% from 742.8 to 753.2 for non-Hispanic whites.

The rate for Hispanic persons did not change significantly.

The highest rate was recorded for the non-Hispanic black population, followed by the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6613a6.htm


Prevalence of HPV in Adults Aged 18–69: United States, 2011–2014

April 6, 2017

Questions for Geraldine McQuillan, Ph.D., Statistician, and Lead Author of “Prevalence of HPV in Adults Aged 18–69: United States, 2011–2014”

Q:  Are these the first HPV estimates you’ve released?  If not, how has this problem changed over time?

GQ:  In this report we do not examine changes over time. But based on a report authored by one of our Co-authors, Dr. Markowitz, analyzing previously released NHANES data, since the highly efficaciously vaccine against HPV 6,11 and 18 was introduced in 2006, the prevalence of high risk HPV in female adolescents has decreased by 64% and among females age 20-24 years by 34%.


Q:  What do you think is the most striking finding in your report?

GQ:  That over 20% of the adult population of the US have high risk HPV detected with significant race/ethnic differences.


Q:  What are we to make of the relatively low HPV prevalence numbers among Asians?  Are they less promiscuous/sexually active?

GQ:  This is a brief report that provides estimates on HPV prevalence overall and by race/ethnic differences.  We did not further examine the characteristics of these individuals and cannot speculate on why the prevalence may be lower among Asian adults.


Q: Your report talks about people with “high risk” HPV being at a higher risk for cancer – but what is the difference between low risk HPV and high risk HPV?  How is that determined medically?

GQ:  It is not determined medically but by a laboratory test looking at subtypes that are associated with cancer. High risk subtypes have been associated with oral, genital and anal cancers, while low risk types have been associated with warts.


Q: Are people with genital HPV at a higher risk to contract other STIs, including HIV?

GQ:  We again did not examine this in the current report, but based on prior research, we know that men who have HIV and men who have sex with men are at particular risk for anal, penile and throat cancers due to persistent HPV infection.


Q: What are the current recommendations for HPV vaccine?

GQ:  According to Dr. Lauri Markowitz with the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC recommends two doses of HPV vaccine for 11 and 12 year olds to prevent HPV cancers. Younger adolescents need fewer doses to complete the HPV vaccination series compared to older adolescents. The first dose is recommended at 11-12 years old. Vaccination can be started at age 9. The second dose of the vaccine should be administered 6 to 12 months after the first dose. Teens and young adults who start the series at ages 15 through 26 years need three doses of HPV vaccine to protect against cancer-causing HPV infections. Adolescents aged 9 through 14 years who have already received two doses of HPV vaccine less than 5 months apart, will require a third dose. Three doses are recommended for people with weakened immune systems aged 9-26 years. Here’s a link to the press release that describes the changes: https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/p1020-hpv-shots.html


Q: What other findings in your report did you find striking?

GQ:  That among all race/ethnic groups males were significantly more likely to be infected with oral HPV except for high risk HPV among Asian adults.


QuickStats: Percentage of U.S. Women Aged 21–65 Years Who Never Had a Papanicolaou Test (Pap Test), by Place of Birth and Length of Residence in the United States

April 3, 2017

In 2013 and 2015 combined, 6.8% of U.S. women aged 21–65 years had never received a Pap test in their lifetime.

Foreign-born women were more than twice as likely as U.S. born women to have never received a Pap test (13.4% versus 5.2%).

Foreign-born women who lived in the United States for more than 25% of their lifetime were almost twice as likely as those who resided in the United States for 25% or less of their lifetime (21.5% versus 10.9%) to have never received a Pap test.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6612a9.htm