QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Who Have Paid Sick Leave, by Industry — National Health Interview Survey, 2009 and 2018

August 30, 2019

The percentage of all currently employed workers with access to paid sick leave increased from 57.8% in 2009 to 62.4% in 2018.

By industry, the percentage increased for workers in construction (32.7% to 43.9%), wholesale & retail trade (48.3% to 53.1%), services (56.7% to 60.8%), and manufacturing (60.7% to 65.5%).

In 2018, fewer than half of workers in agriculture, forestry, and fishing and construction industries had access to paid sick leave compared to approximately 90% of workers in public administration.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2009–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

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QuickStats: Rate of Alcohol-Induced Deaths Among Persons Aged 25 Years or Older, by Age Group

August 26, 2019

Rates of alcohol-induced deaths for persons aged 45–64 years increased from 17.3 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 26.0 in 2017.

For persons aged 25–44 years, rates declined from 1999 to 2005, were stable from 2005 to 2012, and then increased from 2012 (4.8) to 2017 (6.3).

A similar pattern was observed for persons aged ≥65 years, with an initial decline, a stable period, and then an increase from 2011 (12.0) to 2017 (16.4).

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6833a5.htm


Strategies Used by Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017–2018

August 21, 2019

Questions for Robin Cohen, Ph.D. and Lead Author of ”Strategies Used by Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017-2018.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in your report?

RC: Among adults with diagnosed diabetes, more than 13 percent did not take their medication as prescribed to save money and almost 1 in 4 asked their doctor for a lower cost medication.


Q: Do you have other data that would put these diabetes findings in context with other diseases?

RC: We have not looked at strategies adults use to reduce their prescription for other diseases. However, two previously published reports examined strategies used by adults aged 18-64 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db333.htm) and by adults aged 65 and over (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db335.htm) to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2016-2017.


Q: Do you have any data on this topic for earlier years?

RC: We do not have reports addressing strategies used by adults with diagnosed diabetes for earlier years. However, two previous reports examined strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2011 and 2013.


Q: Which age group or demographic group seems to be having the biggest problem with the cost of diabetes medication or with taking their medication?

RC: Among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes who were prescribed medication in the past 12 months, the percentages of adults who did not take their medication as prescribed to reduce their prescription drug costs were highest among women and adults under age 65.  Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.


Q: Any other significant points you’d like to make about your report?

RC: Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.


Over 1/3 of Nonsmoking Kids Exposed To Secondhand Smoke

August 15, 2019

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Mortality trends by race and ethnicity among adults aged 25 and over: United States, 2000–2017

July 23, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Sally Curtin, Health Statistician, of “Mortality trends by race and ethnicity among adults aged 25 and over: United States, 2000–2017.”

Q: What is different in this report from what you released in the 2017 final deaths report?

SC: The 2017 final death report shows death rates by race and ethnicity for 5- and 10-year age groups.  The difference is that we are using broad age groups to categorize adults and examining mortality trends:

  • Young adults 25-44
  • Middle-aged 45-64
  • Elderly 65+

Q: Why did you decide to focus on death rates by race and ethnicity for this report?

SC: Compared with death rates for non-Hispanic white (NHW) adults, traditionally rates for non-Hispanic black (NHB) have been the higher while rates for Hispanic have been lower.  We wanted to see if these differences were narrowing or widening.  We also wanted to examine whether trends were similar among the race/ethnicity groups for the three age groups of adults.


Q: How did the data vary by age groups?

SC: Trends differed by age group.  For NHW, NHB and Hispanic, all groups experienced increases over the period for young adults 25-44, NHW and NHB experienced increases for middle-aged adults 45-64, and all groups experienced declines in death rates for the elderly.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

SC: A couple of very interesting findings. First, all race/ethnicity groups are seeing increases in death rates for young adults aged 25-44, by 21% since 2012 for NHW and NHB.  Also, death rates for elderly adults ages 65+ are now higher for NHW than NHB.


Q: Why did the death rate decline for U.S. Hispanic adults?

SC: Some of the causes of death which have caused the rates to stop declining, or even to increase, among NHW and NHB have not affected Hispanic adults similarly.  For example, a recent report showed that heart disease death rates have been increasing among middle-aged NHW and NHB adults, but not for Hispanic adults.

 

 


Eye Disorders and Vision Loss among U.S. Adults Aged 45 and Over with Diagnosed Diabetes

July 18, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Amy Cha, Statistician, of “Eye Disorders and Vision Loss among U.S. Adults Aged 45 and Over with Diagnosed Diabetes.”

Q: Why did you decide to focus on eye disorder and vision loss for adults aged 45 or older with diagnosed diabetes for this report?

AC: The prevalence of diabetes increases with age. Eye disorders are a frequent complication from diabetes and vision loss is a severe condition that often has a negative impact on a person’s quality of life and mental health. Moreover, duration of diabetes is a risk factor for the progression of visual problems.

This report compared the age-adjusted percentages of older adults (aged 45 and over) with diagnosed diabetes who were told by a doctor or other health professional that they had cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, or macular degeneration and vision loss due to these disorders, by years since their diabetes diagnosis.


Q: Do you have data that directly corresponds with this report that goes back further than 2016?

AC: Data on diabetes, cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration were collected in 2002 and 2008 by the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). However, this is the first report covering the prevalence of eye disorders and vision loss among older adults with diagnosed diabetes.


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

AC: We were surprised that even after accounting for age, adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were still more likely to have eye disorders than those having diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years.


Q: Why is it that so many adults with diagnosed diabetes have cataracts?

AC: Diabetes can affect many parts of the body. This report did not examine the causal pathway of diabetes and cataracts.  This report focused on the prevalence of eye disorders by years since diabetes diagnosis in adults aged 45 and older.  We compared two time intervals, those who were diagnosed more recently – less than 10 years, and those who were  diagnosed with diabetes a longer time – 10 years or more. Cataracts and vision loss due to cataracts were both associated with longer duration since diabetes diagnosis.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AC: Adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were more likely to report cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and macular degeneration than those with diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years. In addition, adults who have had diagnosed diabetes for 10 years or more were more likely to report vision loss due to cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and macular degeneration than those having diagnosed diabetes for less than 10 years.


Attempts to Lose Weight Among Adolescents Aged 16–19 in the United States, 2013–2016

July 17, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Kendra McDow, Health Statistician, of “Attempts to Lose Weight Among Adolescents Aged 16–19 in the United States, 2013–2016.”

Q: What was the most significant finding in your report?

KM: Almost 40% of adolescents 16-19 years old tried to lose weight in the past year and the groups with the highest percentages were girls, Hispanic teens and teens with obesity.


Q: Why do more Hispanic teens attempt to lose weight than other race/ethnic groups?

KM: Yes, that was an interesting finding. Data from another source – the Youth Behavioral Risk Surveillance System (YBRSS) support this finding. In 2017 YBRSS also found that Hispanic teens were more likely to try to lose weight compared to other racial/Hispanic-origin groups. Our study did not look at motivations or the reason why adolescents attempt to lose weight. This a great area for further study!


Q: Do we have any sense of whether the number/percent of teens trying to lose weight has increased or declined over time?

KM: Our study period was from 2013-2016. For this analysis we didn’t look at trends but we started to look into this and found some changes in the way the data were collected over time. We need to explore this more fully. Trend analysis using YRBSS (9th through 12th graders) showed a significant increase in weight loss attempts from 1991 through 2017 (41.8% to 47.1%).


Q: What type of exercising do teens do to lose weight?

KM: Exercise was the most commonly reported method to lose weight. Our study did not specifically look at the type or intensity of exercise adolescents are doing to lose weight. Regular physical activity among adolescents is important for life-long health.


Q: Is there a public health “take home message” here?

KM: Teens are employing multiple methods to lose weight. The vast majority, over 83%, of teens trying to lose weight were exercising. Over half were drinking water and almost half were eating less. And certain populations are more likely to attempt to lose weight, including girls, Hispanic adolescents and adolescents with obesity. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the promotion of healthy weight loss and adoption of healthy eating and physical activity.


Q: Anything else you’d like to add?

KM: We saw that the majority of adolescents who attempted to lose weight used recommended lifestyle modification strategies of healthy eating and exercise. In addition to exercise, drinking more water and eating less, 44.7% of adolescents reported they ate less junk food or fast food and 44.6% ate more fruits, vegetables and salads. This is promising! Of note, 16.5% (1 in 6 adolescents) reported skipping meals as a weight loss method. The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages unhealthy weight loss strategies, such as skipping meals and dieting, and encourages healthy eating and physical activity behaviors for adolescents